Lourdes Fañanás

Centro de Investigación Biomedica En Red del Área de Salud Mental, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (203)803.47 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Glutamatergic neurotransmission dysfunction has classically been related to the aetiology of psychotic disorders. A substantial polygenic component shared across these disorders has been reported and molecular genetics studies have associated glutamatergic-related genes, such as d-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA) and regulator of G-protein signalling 4 (RGS4) with the risk for psychotic disorders. Our aims were to examine: (i) the relationship between DAOA and RGS4 and the risk for psychotic disorders using a family-based association approach, and (ii) whether variations in these genes are associated with differences in patients' cognitive performance. Methods: The sample comprised 753 subjects (222 patients with psychotic disorders and 531 first-degree relatives). Six SNPs in DAOA and 5 SNPs in RGS4 were genotyped. Executive cognitive performance was assessed with Trail Making Test B (TMT-B) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Genetic association analyses were conducted with PLINK, using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) for the family-based study and linear regression for cognitive performance analyses. Results: The haplotype GAGACT at DAOA was under-transmitted to patients (P=0.0008), indicating its association with these disorders. With regards to cognitive performance, the DAOA haplotype GAGGCT was associated with worse scores in TMT-B (P=0.018) in SZ patients only. RGS4 analyses did not report significant results. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the DAOA gene may contribute to the risk for psychotic disorders and that this gene may play a role as a modulator of executive function, probably through the dysregulation of the glutamatergic signalling.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · European Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: The hippocampus is a key modulator of stress responses underlying depressive behavior. While FKBP5 has been found associated with a large number of stress-related outcomes and hippocampal features, its potential role in modifying the hippocampal communication transfer mechanisms with other brain regions remains largely unexplored. The putative genetic or environmental roots of the association between depression and structural connectivity alterations of the hippocampus were evaluated combining diffusion weighted imaging with both a quantitative genetics approach and molecular information on the rs1360780 single nucleotide polymorphism, in a sample of 54 informative monozygotic twins (27 pairs). Three main results were derived from the present analyses. First, graph-theoretical measures of hippocampal connectivity were altered in depression. Specifically, decreased connectivity strength and increased network centrality of the right hippocampus were found in depressed individuals. Second, these hippocampal alterations are potentially driven by familial factors (genes plus shared environment). Third, there is an additive interaction effect between FKBP5’s rs1360780 variant and the graph-theoretical metrics of hippocampal connectivity to influence depression risk. Our data reveals alterations of the communication patterns between the hippocampus and the rest of the brain in depression, effects potentially driven by overall familial factors (genes plus shared twin environment) and modified by the FKBP5 gene.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Brain Imaging and Behavior
  • Salvador Miret · Mar Fatjó-Vilas · Víctor Peralta · Lourdes Fañanás
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    ABSTRACT: Los síntomas básicos consisten en sutiles molestias subclínicas, experimentadas subjetivamente por el paciente, principalmente referidas a la volición, la afectividad, el pensamiento y lenguaje, la percepción, la memoria, la acción motora, las funciones vegetativas centrales, el control de procesos cognitivos auomáticos y la tolerancia al estrés. Descritos inicialmente por Huber, desde una aproximación fenomenológica, forman parte de las manifestaciones más precoces de la esquizofrenia, a lo largo de cuyo curso pueden adquirir diferente evolución. Su presentación durante la fase prodrómica de la enfermedad, para cuya evaluación han sido desarrollados diferentes instrumentos, constituye (junto con los criterios ultra-high risk) una de las 2 principales aproximaciones para su caracterización, lo que permite definir estados clínicos de riesgo para el desarrollo de psicosis. En la presente revisión se ofrece una visión actualizada del concepto de síntomas básicos, subrayando su potencial valor a la hora de establecer correlatos neurobiológicos de interés en la investigación etiopatogénica.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Revista de Psiquiatría Biológica y Salud Mental
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Phenotype definition of psychotic disorders has a strong impact on the degree of familial aggregation. Nevertheless, the extent to which distinct classification systems affect familial aggregation (ie, familiality) remains an open question. This study was aimed at examining the familiality associated with 4 nosologic systems of psychotic disorders (DSM-IV, ICD-10, Leonhard's classification and a data-driven approach) and their constituting diagnoses in a sample of multiplex families with psychotic disorders. Methods: Participants were probands with a psychotic disorder, their parents and at least one first-degree relative with a psychotic disorder. The sample was made of 441 families comprising 2703 individuals, of whom 1094 were affected and 1709 unaffected. Results: The Leonhard classification system had the highest familiality (h (2) = 0.64), followed by the empirical (h (2) = 0.55), DSM-IV (h (2) = 0.50), and ICD-10 (h (2) = 0.48). Familiality estimates for individual diagnoses varied considerably (h (2) = 0.25-0.79). Regarding schizophrenia diagnoses, Leonhard's systematic schizophrenia (h (2) = 0.78) had the highest familiality, followed by latent class core schizophrenia (h (2) = 0.74), DSM-IV schizophrenia (h (2) = 0.48), and ICD-10 schizophrenia (h (2) = 0.41). Psychotic mood disorders showed substantial familiality across nosologic systems (h (2) = 0.60-0.77). Domains of psychopathology other than reality-distortion symptoms showed moderate familiality irrespective of diagnosis (h (2) = 0.22-0.52) with the deficit syndrome of schizophrenia showing the highest familiality (h (2) = 0.66). Conclusions: While affective psychoses showed relatively high familiality estimates across classification schemes, those of nonaffective psychoses varied markedly as a function of the diagnostic scheme with a narrow schizophrenia phenotype maximizing its familial aggregation. Leonhard's classification of psychotic disorders may be better suited for molecular genetic studies than the official diagnostic systems.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Schizophrenia Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Neuritin 1 gene (NRN1) is involved in neurodevelopment processes and synaptic plasticity and its expression is regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We aimed to investigate the association of NRN1 with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD) and bipolar disorders (BPD), to explore its role in age at onset and cognitive functioning, and to test the epistasis between NRN1 and BDNF. Methods The study was developed in a sample of 954 SSD/BPD patients and 668 healthy subjects. Genotyping analyses included 11 SNPs in NRN1 and one functional SNP in BDNF. Results The frequency of the haplotype C-C (rs645649–rs582262) was significantly increased in patients compared to controls (P = 0.0043), while the haplotype T-C-C-T-C-A (rs3763180–rs10484320–rs4960155–rs9379002–rs9405890–rs1475157) was more frequent in controls (P = 3.1 × 10−5). The variability at NRN1 was nominally related to changes in age at onset and to differences in intelligence quotient, in SSD patients. Epistasis between NRN1 and BDNF was significantly associated with the risk for SSD/BPD (P = 0.005). Conclusions Results suggest that: (i) NRN1 variability is a shared risk factor for both SSD and BPD, (ii) NRN1 may have a selective impact on age at onset and intelligence in SSD, and (iii) the role of NRN1 seems to be not independent of BDNF.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry
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    S Alemany · J Moya · M I Ibáñez · H Villa · L Mezquita · G Ortet · C Gastó · L Fañanás · B Arias

    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Psychological Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Prenatal stress has been widely associated with a number of short- and long-term pathological outcomes. Epigenetic mechanisms are thought to partially mediate these environmental insults into the fetal physiology. One of the main targets of developmental programming is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as it is the main regulator of the stress response. Accordingly, an increasing number of researchers have recently focused on the putative association between DNA methylation at the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) and prenatal stress, among other types of psychosocial stress. The current study aims to systematically review and meta-analyze the existing evidence linking several forms of prenatal stress with DNA methylation at the region 1F of the NR3C1 gene. The inclusion of relevant articles allowed combining empirical evidence from 977 individuals by meta-analytic techniques, whose methylation assessments showed overlap across five consecutive CpG sites (GRCh37/hg19 chr5:142,783,607-142,783,639). From this information, methylation levels at CpG site 36 displayed a significant correlation to prenatal stress (r = 0.14, 95% CI: 0.05-0.23, P = 0.002). This result supports the proposed association between a specific CpG site located at the NR3C1 promoter and prenatal stress. Several confounders, such as gender, methylation at other glucocorticoid-related genes, and adjustment for pharmacological treatments during pregnancy, should be taken into account in further studies.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Epigenetics: official journal of the DNA Methylation Society
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    ABSTRACT: Schizophrenia patients typically present a widespread bilateral cortical thinning from the early stages of the illness. However, there is controversy whether this reduction in cortical thickness (CT) is static or progressive over the evolution of the disorder. Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is one of the main candidates genes for schizophrenia, as it has been found associated to the illness, and to several endophenotypes of the disorder including structural brain differences. This gene is known to be involved in neurodevelopment and brain maturation processes. We therefore hypothesized that variations in this gene modulate different progressions of CT in psychosis. Seventy-nine Caucasian drug-naive patients experiencing a first episode of non-affective psychosis were genotyped for rs6675281 (Leu607Phe) and rs821616 (Ser704Cys) SNPs of the DISC1 gene. Brain MRIs were carried out at baseline and 3 years after initiating the treatment. Other clinical and socio-demographic variables were recorded to rule out possible confounding effects. Patients homozygous for the Leu allele of the rs6675281 SNP had a significant (p < 0.05) descend in CT over the 3-years period, while those carrying the Phe allele presented an increase in CT. When combining the two SNPs we found a synergic effect on CT progression, presenting those patients homozygous for Leu607 +Ser704 a more pronounced cortical thinning. In conclusion, DISC1 gene variations may modulate the longitudinal changes in cortical thickness in patients suffering from a first episode of non-affective psychosis.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Brain Imaging and Behavior
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    ABSTRACT: Schizotypal traits are phenotypic risk factors for schizophrenia, associated with biological changes across a putative schizophrenia spectrum. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that brain structural changes in key brain areas relevant to this spectrum (esp. medial and lateral prefrontal cortex) would vary across different degrees of schizotypal trait expression and/or phenotypic markers of psychosis proneness in healthy non-clinical volunteers. We analysed high-resolution 3Tesla magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 59 healthy volunteers using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), correlating grey matter values to the positive and negative symptom factors of the schizotypal personality questionnaire (SPQ, German version) and a measure of psychosis proneness (community assessment of psychic experiences, CAPE). We found positive correlations between positive SPQ dimension and bilateral inferior and right superior frontal cortices, and positive CAPE dimension and left inferior frontal cortex, as well as CAPE negative dimension and right supplementary motor area (SMA) and left inferior parietal cortex. However, only the positive correlation of the right precuneus with negative schizotypy scores was significant after FWE correction for multiple comparisons. Our findings confirm an effect of schizotypal traits and psychosis proneness on brain structure in healthy subjects, providing further support to a biological continuum model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Schizophrenia Research
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    ABSTRACT: The main aim of the present research was to study the prospective relationships of the five-factor model of personality and the internalizing and externalizing suprafactors of psychopathology. A sample of 323 young adults completed the NEO-FFI at Time 1 and different scales of symptoms 5 years later. Neuroti- cism prospectively predicted the internalizing factor, while extraversion, low agreeableness and low con- scientiousness predicted the externalizing factor. We found additional paths between introversion and social phobia symptoms, and between low agreeableness and psychopathy symptoms. These relation- ships remained significant, even when controlling for previous symptoms, except for extraversion. Gen- der had no moderation effect on the interrelationship between personality and psychopathology factors. The present study extends previous research about personality and psychopathology, and suggests differ- ent ways in which they can be related.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Personality and Individual Differences
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    ABSTRACT: Recent findings indicate that alterations of the amygdalar resting-state fMRI connectivity play an important role in the etiology of depression. While both depression and resting-state brain activity are shaped by genes and environment, the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors mediating the relationship between amygdalar resting-state connectivity and depression remain largely unexplored. Likewise, novel neuroimaging research indicates that different mathematical representations of resting-state fMRI activity patterns are able to embed distinct information relevant to brain health and disease. The present study analyzed the influence of genes and environment on amygdalar resting-state fMRI connectivity, in relation to depression risk. High-resolution resting-state fMRI scans were analyzed to estimate functional connectivity patterns in a sample of 48 twins (24 monozygotic pairs) informative for depressive psychopathology (6 concordant, 8 discordant and 10 healthy control pairs). A graph-theoretical framework was employed to construct brain networks using two methods: (i) the conventional approach of filtered BOLD fMRI time-series and (ii) analytic components of this fMRI activity. Results using both methods indicate that depression risk is increased by environmental factors altering amygdalar connectivity. When analyzing the analytic components of the BOLD fMRI time-series, genetic factors altering the amygdala neural activity at rest show an important contribution to depression risk. Overall, these findings show that both genes and environment modify different patterns the amygdala resting-state connectivity to increase depression risk. The genetic relationship between amygdalar connectivity and depression may be better elicited by examining analytic components of the brain resting-state BOLD fMRI signals. Hum Brain Mapp, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Human Brain Mapping
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research suggests that low birth weight (BW) induces reduced brain cortical surface area (SA) which would persist until at least early adulthood. Moreover, low BW has been linked to psychiatric disorders such as depression and psychological distress, and to altered neurocognitive profiles. We present novel findings obtained by analysing high-resolution structural MRI scans of 48 twins; specifically, we aimed: i) to test the BW-SA association in a middle-aged adult sample; and ii) to assess whether either depression/anxiety disorders or intellectual quotient (IQ) influence the BW-SA link, using a monozygotic (MZ) twin design to separate environmental and genetic effects. Both lower BW and decreased IQ were associated with smaller total and regional cortical SA in adulthood. Within a twin pair, lower BW was related to smaller total cortical and regional SA. In contrast, MZ twin differences in SA were not related to differences in either IQ or depression/anxiety disorders. The present study supports findings indicating that i) BW has a long-lasting effect on cortical SA, where some familial and environmental influences alter both foetal growth and brain morphology; ii) uniquely environmental factors affecting BW also alter SA; iii) higher IQ correlates with larger SA; and iv) these effects are not modified by internalizing psychopathology.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Early Life Stress (ELS) is a known risk factor for suffering psychopathology in adulthood. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been described to be deregulated in both individuals who experienced early psychosocial stress and in patients with a wide range of psychiatric disorders. The NR3C1 gene codes for the glucocorticoid receptor, a key element involved in several steps of HPA axis modulation. In this review, we gather existing evidence linking NR3C1 methylation pattern with either ELS or psychopathology. We summarize that several types of ELS have been frequently associated with NR3C1 hypermethylation whereas hypomethylation has been continuously found to be associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. In light of the reported findings, the main concerns of ongoing research in this field are the lack of methodological consensus and selection of CpG sites. Further studies should target individual CpG site methylation assessment focusing in biologically relevant areas such as transcription factor binding regions whereas widening the examined sequence in order to include all non-coding first exons of the NR3C1 gene in the analysis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Late and early stressful factors have widely been recognized to play a role in the aetiology of depression. Recent research indicates that such adverse environmental stimuli may alter gene expression in humans via epigenetic modifications. While epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation are likely involved in these processes, it is still unknown what specific genomic loci may be hyper- or hypo-methylated in depression. The association between depressive symptoms during the last 30 days (Brief Symptom Inventory [BSI]) and peripheral-blood DNA methylation levels at genomic loci previously reported as epigenetically altered in saliva and brain of depressive patients was evaluated in a community sample of 34 adult Caucasian MZ twins (17 pairs). Intrapair DNA methylation differences in an intron of DEPDC7 (chr11:33040743) were associated with intrapair differences in current depressive symptoms. Accordingly, a site-specific 10% DNA hypomethylation in a co-twin would correlate with a current depressive symptom score around 3.1 BSI points above the score of his/her less-depressed co-twin. These findings indicate that DEPDC7 hypomethylation in peripheral blood DNA may be associated with recent depressive symptomatology, in line with previous results. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · European Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: Depressive disorders have been shown to be highly influenced by environmental pathogenic factors, some of which are believed to exert stress on human brain functioning via epigenetic modifications. Previous genome-wide methylomic studies on depression have suggested that, along with differential DNA methylation, affected co-twins of monozygotic (MZ) pairs have increased DNA methylation variability, probably in line with theories of epigenetic stochasticity. Nevertheless, the potential biological roots of this variability remain largely unexplored. The current study aimed to evaluate whether DNA methylation differences within MZ twin pairs were related to differences in their psychopathological status. Data from the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip was used to evaluate peripheral blood DNA methylation of 34 twins (17 MZ pairs). Two analytical strategies were used to identify (a) differentially methylated probes (DMPs) and (b) variably methylated probes (VMPs). Most DMPs were located in genes previously related to neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Remarkably, one of these DMPs (cg01122889) was located in the WDR26 gene, the DNA sequence of which has been implicated in major depressive disorder from genome-wide association studies. Expression of WDR26 has also been proposed as a biomarker of depression in human blood. Complementarily, VMPs were located in genes such as CACNA1C, IGF2 and the p38 MAP kinase MAPK11, showing enrichment for biological processes such as glucocorticoid signaling. These results expand on previous research to indicate that both differential methylation and differential variability have a role in the etiology and clinical manifestation of depression, and provide clues on specific genomic loci of potential interest in the epigenetics of depression.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Translational Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: Structural brain abnormalities are already present during the early phases of psychosis, but factors underlying brain volume changes are still not well understood. The neuregulin 1 gene (NRG1), influencing neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity, has been associated with schizophrenia. Our aim was to examine whether variations in the NRG1 gene (SNP8NRG221132, SNP8NRG6221533 and SNP8NRG243177 polymorphisms) influence longitudinal changes in the brain during a first episode of psychosis (FEP). A 3-year follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was performed. Fifty-nine minimally medicated patients who were experiencing FEP and 14 healthy control individuals underwent genotyping and structural brain MRI at baseline and at 1- and 3-year follow-up. A comparison of brain volumes, gray matter, white matter (WM), lateral ventricles (LV), cortical cerebrospinal fluid, and thalamus and caudate was made between the groups according to their genotype. In patients, the SNP8NRG6221533 risk C allele was significantly associated with increased LV volume across time. C allele carriers had significantly less WM compared with subjects homozygous for the T allele after the follow-up. No other significant differences were observed among subgroups. No significant changes according to the genotypes were found in healthy individuals. Our findings suggest that variations of neurodevelopment-related genes, such as the NRG1 gene, can contribute to brain abnormalities described in early phases of schizophrenia and progressive changes during the initial years of the illness. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a relation between NRG1 polymorphisms and longitudinal brain changes is reported. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Neuropsychobiology
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    ABSTRACT: Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) symptoms or features are common in patients with psychosis and their healthy relatives. However, the long-term stability of these SPD features and therefore their constituting enduring traits underlying vulnerability to psychosis remain to be clarified. Thirty-two patients with psychotic disorders and 29 of their healthy siblings were included from the long-term follow-up study of 89 nuclear families. Participants were clinically assessed by means of a semi-structured diagnostic interview, whereas the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Brief (SPQ-B) was applied for the self-assessment of SPD symptoms. The assessments were carried out upon admission to the study and at follow-up, about 10 years later. The patients had higher scores than their siblings on the SPQ-B both at baseline and follow-up. In addition, self-reported SPD symptoms remained stable over time in total scores and in all the SPQ-B subscores, except for the SPQ-B Disorganization subscale. Self-reported SPD symptoms were stable over the long term among patients with psychotic disorders and their healthy siblings. This finding provides new support for including the SPD construct as a trait measure for studies addressing both vulnerability to psychosis in first-degree relatives of patients with psychosis and long-term persistence of symptoms in patients suffering from psychosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015
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    Dataset: PAID def

    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The number of large collaborative research networks in mental health is increasing. Training programs are an essential part of them. We critically review the specific implementation of a research training program in a translational Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health in order to inform the strategic integration of basic research into clinical practice to have a positive impact in the mental health system and society. Description of training activities, specific educational programs developed by the research network, and challenges on its implementation are examined Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has focused on training through different activities which have led to the development of an interuniversity master's degree postgraduate program in mental health research, certified by the National Spanish Agency for Quality Evaluation and Accreditation. Consolidation of training programs within the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has considerably advanced the training of researchers to meet competency standards on research. The master's degree constitutes a unique opportunity to accomplish neuroscience and mental health research career-building within the official framework of university programs in Spain. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Revista de Psiquiatría Biológica y Salud Mental
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    ABSTRACT: Background Few studies have analyzed the course of neurocognition in treated children and adolescents with early-onset bipolar disorder (EOBD) and shown improvements in attention, working memory, and verbal memory after treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the progress over two years in neuropsychological performance of a sample of medicated adolescents with EOBD compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods Twenty adolescents, diagnosed in clinical setting as DSM-IV bipolar disorder, treated for two years, euthymic, and 20 gender and age-matched HC were assessed at two moments in reasoning, verbal and visual memory, working memory, speed, visual-motor skills and executive function. Multivariate analyses of variance was carried out to analyze the differences between groups over time, and to monitor the influence of psychotic symptoms and type of mood-stabilizer. Results The entire sample improved on verbal and visual memory tests (verbal recall p<0.01; visual recall p<0.001). Moreover, patients improved more than controls in verbal reasoning (p<0.01), working memory (p<0.01), processing speed (p<0.01) and visual-motor skills (p<0.001). Psychotic symptoms and treatment with lithium were associated with poorer development in executive control tasks. Limitations Sample size was small and groups were re-evaluated in slight different follow-up periods. Doses of antipsychotics drugs over time were not controlled. Conclusions Processing speed and visual-motor skills in the EOBD group normalized during follow-up. Executive functioning, working memory, and verbal and visual memory remained impaired in patients versus controls. The knowledge of cognitive deficits due to normal course of illness or to drug effects allows better therapeutic strategies.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of Affective Disorders

Publication Stats

3k Citations
803.47 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011-2015
    • Centro de Investigación Biomedica En Red del Área de Salud Mental
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2008-2015
    • Instituto de Salud Carlos III
      • CIBER of Mental Health (CIBERSAM)
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • Utrecht University
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 1990-2015
    • University of Barcelona
      • • Department of Animal Biology
      • • Facultad de Biología
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2003-2013
    • Institut Marqués, Spain, Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2012
    • Catholic University of Louvain
      Лувен-ла-Нев, Walloon, Belgium
    • Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra
      Iruña, Navarre, Spain
  • 2000-2007
    • Maastricht University
      • Psychiatrie en Neuropsychologie
      Maastricht, Provincie Limburg, Netherlands
  • 1995
    • Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain