Rufus W Burlingame

INOVA Diagnostics, San Diego, California, United States

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Publications (48)140.71 Total impact

  • N. M. Walsh · P. J. Green · R. W. Burlingame · J. G. Hanly
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    ABSTRACT: Background The spectrum of autoantibody-associated vasculitis includes a newly recognized syndrome induced by levamisole-adulterated cocaine (L/CS). Emerging data has incriminated levamisole as the culprit. The syndrome is characterized clinically by purpuric skin changes, arthralgia or arthritis and systemic symptoms in a cocaine-user, combined with the presence of autoantibodies and occasionally neutropenia. The spectrum of autoantibodies in this setting has been variable. Of interest, antibodies to human neutrophil elastase (HNE), an uncommon subset of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), have been linked with cocaine-related inflammatory conditions and because there can be concomitant low reactivity with the common ANCA specificities (proteinase 3 [PR3] and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) confusing results can be generated in clinical laboratory assays. Objectives We aimed to examine the autoantibody specificities, particularly for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs) and ANCAs, in 4 patients with the L/CS to determine (i) if a consistent profile can be identified, (ii) to compare results for ANCA obtained in a clinical laboratory and in a research immunology laboratory and (iii) to establish whether the presence of the antibodies corresponds with concurrent cocaine use and/or active disease. Methods In the clinical laboratory ANA (dsDNA, Chromatin, Riposomal P, Ro, La, Centromere, Sm, Sm/RNP, Scl-70, and Jo-1) and ANCA (PR3 and MPO) were evaluated by multiplex flow immunoassay (Bio Plex 2200). In the research immunology laboratory a broad panel of ANCA target antigens (azurocidin, BPI, catalase K, cathepsin G, defensins, elastase, lactoferrin, lysozyme, MPO and PR3) was evaluated by ELISA. Results Nineteen serum samples from 4 female users of crack cocaine with the L/CS were examined. Urine toxicology for levamisole was positive in each case. The mean age was 41 years (range: 32-49). All 4 patients had purpuric skin changes of varying severity, arthralgia or arthritis, malaise and positive autoimmune serology. Two had a remitting and relapsing course and the mean follow-up period was 8 months (range 0-12). Serological tests in the clinical laboratory indicated that all 4 patients were ANA+ with specificity for chromatin in 4 and Ro in 1. In the same laboratory, evaluation of sequential samples for ANCA showed inconsistent dual positivity for MPO and PR3 in 3 cases. Determination of ANCA target antigen specificities in the research immunology laboratory revealed borderline dual positivity for PR3 and MPO in 2 patients. Anti-HNE antibodies were found in 3 cases and anti-lactoferrin in 4. A temporal association between the presence of any of the antibodies and use of cocaine or active disease was not demonstrated. Conclusions Data from this small but well characterized population suggests that, in an appropriate clinical setting, a positive ANA with specificity for chromatin and a positive ANCA with specificity for HNE and/or lactoferrin support a diagnosis of the L/CS. Despite their potential diagnostic utility these serological tests are not reliable biomarkers of concurrent cocaine use or active disease. Disclosure of Interest None Declared
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Although many studies have suggested that the presence of autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor (RF) and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are predictors of joint damage, the association with disability and quality of life questionnaires are not known. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the correlation between the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores with serological markers, such as RF, anti-CCP, and anti-citrullinated vimentin (anti-Sa). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty five patients with early RA (ERA) from the Brasília Cohort of ERA were evaluated. Serology tests (ELISA) for RF (IgM, IgG, and IgA), anti-CCP (CCP2, CCP3, and CCP3.1), and anti-Sa were performed, with the application of the HAQ and SF-36 questionnaires in the initial evaluation. RESULTS: The mean age was 45 years, with a female predominance (86%). At the initial evaluation, RF was positive in 32 individuals (49.23%), anti-CCP in 34 (52.3%), and anti-Sa in nine (13.8%). The initial HAQ score was 1.8. The SF-36 scores were as follow: role-emotional, 19.3; social functioning, 43.1; bodily pain, 25.43; general health, 57.6; mental health, 48.1; vitality, 49.5; role-physical, 4.6; and physical functioning, 24.7. The HAQ and SF-36 scores did not vary with autoantibody levels. CONCLUSION: In many patients, ERA has a major impact on physical ability and health-related quality of life. Although RF and anti-CCP tests have been related with joint destruction and worse clinical prognosis, there is no correlation with the results of questionnaires of quality of life and disability.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012 · Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia
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    Andreas Swart · Rufus W Burlingame · Irmgard Gürtler · Michael Mahler
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: We compared 2 anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) assays using a routine patient cohort. Methods: Two-hundred ninety-five sera were collected from patients for whom ACPA was ordered and tested for ACPA by QUANTA Lite® CCP 3 (INOVA Diagnostics, Inc., San Diego) and EliA® CCP (CCP, Phadia, Germany). Rheumatoid factor (RF) was determined using Quantex RF(II) (Biokit, Spain). Results: Acceptable qualitative (96.6%, kappa=0.93) and quantitative agreements (Spearman rho=0.77; p<0.0001) were observed between the two ACPA assays. Nine samples were CCP3+/CCP2- and one sample was CCP2+/CCP3-. Of the 9 CCP3+/CCP2- patients, 6 (66.7%) had RA, one patient had ankylosing spondylitis, one osteoarthritis and one psoriatic arthritis. The CCP3-/CCP2+ patient had juvenile RA. At the manufacturer's cut-offs, the sensitivities and specificities were 77.3%/98.1% (CCP2), 81.6%/96.8% (CCP3) and 65.2%/89.6% (RF), respectively. At 98.7% specificity level, the sensitivities in the total cohort were 59.6% (CCP2) and 69.5% (CCP3) while the sensitivities in the RF-negative group were 49.0% (CCP2) and 57.1% (CCP3). In the RF-negative group, sensitivities for patients with a disease duration of ≤ 5years were 38.7% (CCP2) and 51.6% (CCP3). Conclusion: Discrimination between RA and non-RA patients was better using CCP3, most pronounced in RF-negative RA.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · Clinica chimica acta; international journal of clinical chemistry
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    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012 · Pediatric Rheumatology
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    ABSTRACT: Emerging evidence suggests that there are IgM-autoantibodies that may play protective roles in SLE. While IgM are often considered polyreactive, we postulate that there are distinct sets of IgM-autoantibodies of defined autoreactive specificities relevant to different features of SLE. We examined the relationships between levels of IgM natural autoantibodies (NAbs) to apoptosis-associated phosphorylcholine (PC) or malondialdehyde (MDA) antigens, with lupus-associated autoantibodies and features of disease, in 120 SLE patients. IgM anti-PC was significantly higher in patients with low disease activity and less organ damage determined by the SELENA-SLEDAI, the physician's evaluation and the SLICC damage score. Furthermore, IgM anti-PC was significantly higher in patients without cardiovascular events. In contrast, IgM anti-cardiolipin and IgM anti-dsDNA were significantly higher in patients without renal disease. These results support the hypothesis that some IgM autoantibodies are part of a natural immune repertoire that provide homeostatic functions and protection from certain clinical lupus features.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · Clinical Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Anti-RNA polymerase III (RNAP III) antibodies are highly specific for scleroderma (SSc) and associated with diffuse SSc and renal crisis. Coexistence of anti-RNAP III and other SSc autoantibodies is rarely documented. We report three cases with coexisting anti-RNAP III and anti-U1RNP. Autoantibodies in 3829 sera from rheumatology clinics were screened by immunoprecipitation. Anti-RNAP III-positive sera were also examined by immunofluorescence and anti-RNAP III ELISA. In total, 35 anti-RNAP III-positive sera were identified by immunoprecipitation, in which three had coexisting anti-U1RNP. All three were anti-RNAP III ELISA positive. Two had anti-RNAP I dominant (vs. RNAP III) reactivity and showed strong nucleolar staining. A case with anti-U1/U2RNP (U2RNP dominant) had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-SSc overlap syndrome; however, the remaining two cases had SLE without signs of SSc. All three cases of anti-RNAP III + U1RNP fulfilled ACR SLE criteria but none in the group with anti-RNAP III alone (p = 0.0002). In contrast, only one case in the former group had sclerodermatous skin changes and Raynaud's phenomenon, vs. 92% with scleroderma in the latter (p < 0.05). Although anti-RNAP III is highly specific for SSc, cases with coexisting anti-U1RNP are not so uncommon among anti-RNAP III positives (8%, 3/35) and may be SLE without features of SSc.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · Lupus
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluates prospectively whether baseline scores [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and SF-36] can predict clinical and radiographic evolution in a cohort of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during a 3-year follow-up. Forty consecutive early RA patients were followed for 3 years, while receiving standardized treatment according to a pre-established protocol. HAQ and SF-36 were administered at the initial evaluation and at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months. Hands and feet radiographs were obtained at the initial evaluation and at 12, 24 and 36 months. Preselected outcomes were the occurrence of radiographic erosions, the achievement of an EULAR remission, low disease activity status and the need for biological therapy. The mean age at onset was 45 years with a 90% female predominance. Erosions were found in 42% of patients at T0 and in 70% after 3 years (P < 0.001). At T0, the proportion of patients in remission, low, moderate or high disease activity was 0, 0, 7.5 and 92.5% and 22.5, 7.5, 32.5 and 37.5%, respectively, at 3 years. The mean baseline HAQ score was 1.89 and 0.77 by the third year (P < 0.0001). Most SF-36 domains showed significant improvement except for general state and vitality. Biological therapy was deemed necessary in 22.5% of patients. The initial HAQ and SF-36 scores were not associated with clinical remission, bone erosions or the need for biological therapy at 36 months. The HAQ and SF-36 scores measured at baseline could not predict at 3 years, the preselected outcomes in a Brazilian cohort.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Rheumatology International
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    ABSTRACT: Autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have important diagnostic value. The association between the presence of autoantibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide and the response to treatment is controversial. To prospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (<12 months of symptoms) in order to determine the association between serological markers (rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-citrullinated protein antibodies) such as anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) and citrullinated anti-vimentin (anti-Sa) with the occurrence of clinical remission, forty patients diagnosed with early RA at the time of diagnosis were evaluated and followed for 3 years, in use of standardized therapeutic treatment. Demographic and clinical data were recorded, disease activity score 28 (DAS 28), as well as serology tests (ELISA) for RF (IgM, IgG, and IgA), anti-CCP (CCP2, CCP3, and CCP3.1) and anti-Sa in the initial evaluation and at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months of follow-up. The outcome evaluated was the percentage of patients with clinical remission, which was defined by DAS 28 lower than 2.6. Comparisons were made through the Student t test, mixed-effects regression analysis, and analysis of variance (significance level of 5%). The mean age was 45 years, and a female predominance was observed (90%). At the time of diagnosis, RF was observed in 50% of cases (RF IgA-42%, RF IgG-30%, and RF IgM-50%), anti-CCP in 50% (no difference between CCP2, CCP3, and CCP3.1) and anti-Sa in 10%. After 3 years, no change in the RF prevalence and anti-CCP was observed, but the anti-Sa increased to 17.5% (P = 0.001). The percentage of patients in remission, low, moderate, and intense disease activity, according to the DAS 28, was of 0, 0, 7.5, and 92.5% (initial evaluation) and 22.5, 7.5, 32.5, and 37.5% (after 3 years). There were no associations of the presence of autoantibodies in baseline evaluation and in serial analysis with the percentage of clinical remission during follow-up of 3 years The presence of autoantibodies in early RA has no predictive value for clinical remission in early RA.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Rheumatology International
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate an autoantibody profile in pediatric-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients to determine clinical and statistical associations with disease-associated manifestations. Sera from 53 SLE patients and 22 healthy individuals were collected. Antibodies to C1q, histone, chromatin, ribosomal P, dsDNA, and high-avidity dsDNA were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patient records were evaluated for clinical and laboratory associations. The most prevalent autoantibodies found in the SLE cohort were anti-C1q antibodies (n = 32, 60%), which correlated significantly with proteinuria and decreased complement levels (P < 0.05). Anti-C1q and antihistone antibodies were significantly elevated in patients with class III/IV nephritis compared with class I/II/V nephritis (P = 0.041). SLE patients with active nephritis at the time of sample collection demonstrated significantly elevated levels of anti-C1q antibodies compared with those without active nephritis, also exhibiting 100% sensitivity for active nephritis, proteinuria, and urinary casts. Antibodies to C1q, dsDNA, histone, and chromatin were significantly elevated in patients with active disease (P < 0.01). Chart-documented anti-dsDNA antibodies were positive in 28 SLE patients, INOVA anti-dsDNA antibodies in 25 patients, and high-avidity anti-dsDNA antibodies in 8 patients. Antihistone correlated significantly with leukopenia and hemolytic anemia (P < 0.05). This study indicates the importance of measuring anti-C1q antibodies in pediatric-onset SLE patients because elevated anti-C1q antibodies may be more indicative of renal disease activity, showing significant correlation with proteinuria, urinary casts, and active nephritis. Antibodies to C1q, histone, chromatin, and dsDNA exhibited the strongest association with clinical features, indicating the importance of measuring all of these antibodies in pediatric-onset SLE patients.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2011 · Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism
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    ABSTRACT: The diagnostic and prognostic value of the serial measurement of antibodies, such as rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), and anti-citrullinated vimentin (anti-Sa) antibodies, has not been defined in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA). To prospectively assess the presence of RF, anti-CCP, and anti-Sa in ERA patients. Forty ERA (less than 12 months) patients of the Brasília cohort were evaluated and followed up for three years. Both clinical and demographic data were recorded, in addition to the results (ELISA) of RF (IgM, IgG, and IgA), anti-CCP (CCP2, CCP3, and CCP3.1), and anti-Sa at the baseline assessment and after 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months of follow-up. The results were compared by use of Student t test and paired t test. The patients' mean age was 45 years, and 90% of them were female. At the time of diagnosis, RF was identified in 50% of the patients (RF IgA, 42%; RF IgG, 30%; and RF IgM, 50%), anti-CCP in 52.5% (no difference between CCP2, CCP3, and CCP3.1), and anti-Sa in 10%. After three years, no difference was observed in RF and anti-CCP prevalence, but anti-Sa increased to 17.5% (P = 0.001). Repeated RF and anti-CCP measurement, including different isotypes, during three years of follow-up showed no significant changes. The third generation of anti-CCP assays did not increase the diagnostic value of the second-generation assays.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2011 · Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia
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    ABSTRACT: Although cocaine-induced pseudovasculitis and urticarial vasculitis have been reported in the past, levamisole-induced vasculopathy with ecchymosis and necrosis, termed here LIVEN, has only recently been described in association with cocaine use. Levamisole, a veterinary antihelminthic agent used previously as an immunomodulating agent, is present as a "cutting agent" in approximately two-thirds of the cocaine currently entering the United States. Levamisole is believed to potentiate the effects of cocaine and may also be used as a "signature" for tracing its market distribution. Herein, we report 2 cases of LIVEN in patients with histories of chronic cocaine use. In both the cases, a temporal association with neutropenia preceding the eruption was noted. A novel histopathologic finding present only in the second case was the presence of extensive interstitial and perivascular neovascularization. Our 2 cases reaffirm that neutropenia may precede the cutaneous eruption of LIVEN. Case 2 extends the spectrum of histopathologic findings to include the novel phenomenon of neovascularization-hitherto unreported in this entity.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2011 · The American Journal of dermatopathology
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    ABSTRACT: The HLA-DRB1 alleles encoding an amino acid sequence (QKRAA/QRRAA/RRRAA) at position 70 74 of the third hypervariable region of the β1 chain of the HLA-DRB1 gene, called shared epitope (SE), are associated with increased susceptibility to and severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in different populations. To determine the frequency of HLA-DRB1 alleles in Brazilian patients with RA and their association with rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA). Four hundred and twelve patients with RA (ACR 1987) and 215 controls were included. HLA-DRB1 typing was performed by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers and hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP). ACPA was measured by use of the ELISA technique and RF by nephelometry. The statistical analysis comprised the chi-square and Student t tests and logistic regression. HLA-DRB1*04:01, *04:04, *04:05 alleles were associated with RA (P < 0.05); despite the wide confidence interval, it is worth noting the association between the DRB1*09:01 allele and RA (P < 0.05). HLA-DRB1 SE+ alleles were observed in 62.8% of the patients and in 31.1% of controls (OR 3.62; P < 0.001) and were associated with ACPA (OR 2.03; P < 0.001). DRB1-DERAA alleles showed a protective effect against RA (OR 0.42; P < 0.001). In a sample of Brazilian patients with RA, most of whom of mixed heritage, HLA-DRB1 SE+ alleles were associated with susceptibility to disease and presence of ACPA.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2011 · Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia
  • E Akhter · R W Burlingame · AL Seaman · L Magder · M Petri
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    ABSTRACT: Autoantibodies are important in the diagnosis and classification of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but whether they correlate with changes in disease activity within individual patients is controversial. We assessed the association between changes in SLE global and renal activity and changes in several autoantibodies and cell adhesion molecules in patients with SLE. Stored sera collected at two or three clinic visits from each of 49 SLE patients (91% female, 59% African-American, 31% Caucasian, 10% other ethnicity, 38% under 30 years, 41% between 30-44 years, and 21% 45-63 years) were analyzed. The visits were chosen to include one visit with proteinuria, and one or two without, for each patient. Global disease activity was measured by the Physician's Global Assessment (PGA), SELENA-SLEDAI (SLE Disease Activity Index modified to exclude anti-dsDNA and complement) and renal activity assessed by urine protein (by urine dipstick) and Renal Activity Score. Sera were assayed for anti-C1q, anti-chromatin, anti-dsDNA, anti-ribosomal P, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and complement. The associations between changes in disease activity and changes in biomarker levels were assessed. In terms of global disease activity, anti-C1q had the highest association with the PGA (p = 0.09) and was strongly associated with modified SELENA-SLEDAI (p = 0.009). In terms of renal activity, anti-C1q had the highest association with proteinuria (p = 0.079), and was strongly associated with Renal Activity Score (p = 0.006). Anti-C1q performed the best of the potential biomarkers, being significantly associated with the modified SELENA-SLEDAI and with the Renal Activity Score. This study indicates the potential superior utility of anti-C1q over anti-dsDNA and other measures to track renal activity.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2011 · Lupus
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    ABSTRACT: Anti-RNA polymerase III (RNAP III) antibodies are highly specific markers of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, SSc) and associated with a rapidly progressing subset of SSc. The clinical presentation of anti-RNAP III positive patients, onset of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) and SSc in unselected patients in a rheumatology clinic were evaluated. Autoantibodies in sera from 1,966 unselected patients (including 434 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 119 SSc, 85 polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM)) in a rheumatology clinic were screened by radioimmunoprecipitation. Anti-RNAP III positive sera were also tested by immunofluorescence antinuclear antibodies and anti-RNAP III ELISA. Medical records of anti-RNAP III positive patients were reviewed. Among 21 anti-RNAP III positive patients, 16 met the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) SSc criteria at the initial visit but 5 did not; diagnoses were vasculitis, early polyarthritis, renal failure with RP, interstitial lung disease, and Sjögren's syndrome. The first two patients developed rapidly progressive diffuse SSc. An additional case presented with diffuse scleroderma without RP and RP developed two years later. Anti-RNAP III antibodies in these 6 cases of atypical clinical presentation were compared with those in 15 cases of typical (SSc with RP) cases. Anti-RNAP III levels by ELISA were lower in the former group (P = 0.04 by Mann-Whitney test) and 3 of 6 were negative versus only 1 of 15 negative in the latter (P < 0.05 by Fisher's exact test). Three cases of non-SSc anti-RNAP III positive patients had predominant reactivity with RNAP I with weak RNAP III reactivity and had a strong nucleolar staining. Three anti-RNAP III patients, who did not have RP at the initial visit, developed RP months later. Scleroderma developed prior to RP in 5 out of 16 (31%) in the anti-RNAP III group, but this was rare in patients with other autoantibodies. The interval between the onset of RP to scleroderma was short in anti-RNAP III positive patients. Anti-RNAP III antibodies are highly specific for SSc; however, a subset of anti-RNAP III positive patients do not present as typical SSc. The interval between RP and scleroderma in this group is short, and 31% of patients developed scleroderma prior to RP in this group. Anti-RNAP III positive patients may not present as typical SSc and detecting anti-RNAP III may have predictive value.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2011 · Arthritis research & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: The term ‘cocaine-induced pseudovasculitis' was coined to encompass a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings which mimics a systemic vasculitis but lacks confirmatory evidence of vasculitis on biopsy. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies reacting with human neutrophil elastase (HNE) have been reported to distinguish the cocaine-related syndrome from a true autoimmune vasculitis. Published cases of retiform purpura related to cocaine use are rare and an etiologic role for levamisole, a common adulterant of cocaine, has been postulated. We describe two female patients aged 39 and 49 years with cocaine-related retiform purpura, mainly affecting the legs. The initial clinical and serological profile in case 1 led to a suspicion of anti-phospholipid syndrome and in case 2 to Wegener's granulomatosis with an unexplained associated neutropenia. Skin biopsies revealed a mixed pattern of leukocytoclastic vasculitis and microvascular thrombosis in case 1 and pure microvascular thrombosis in case 2. Identification of anti-HNE antibodies in both patients linked their disease to cocaine. The mixed vasculopathic pattern in case 1 and the associated neutropenia in case 2, both known adverse effects of levamisole, point to this as the true etiologic agent. Urine toxicology shortly after a binge of cocaine use in each case was positive for levamisole. Walsh NMG, Green PJ, Burlingame RW, Pasternak S, Hanly JG. Cocaine-related retiform purpura: evidence to incriminate the adulterant, levamisole.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of Cutaneous Pathology
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    ABSTRACT: To compare smooth muscle antibody (SMA) patterns in tissue sections with patterns in an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using a rat intestinal epithelial cell line and results from an F-actin IgG ELISA. SMA positive sera (n = 188) were classified by immunofluorescence staining of rodent kidney, stomach and liver sections as SMA-T (tubules) (n = 124) or SMA-V (vessels) (n = 64). The F-actin pattern on the rat epithelial cell line was identified by immunofluorescence staining of actin cables that was confirmed by dual immunofluorescence co-localisation with phalloidin. Of 124 SMA-T positive sera, 123 reacted with the epithelial cell line and 120 with F-actin by ELISA, giving sensitivity for detection of anti-F-actin antibody of 99% and 97%, respectively. Of 64 SMA-V positive sera, four reacted with the epithelial cell line (6%) and 41 with F-actin by ELISA (64%). Tests of 493 normal blood donors and 100 disease controls yielded specificities of 584/593 (98.5%) and 562/593 (94.8%) for the cell line IFA and F-actin ELISA, respectively. The rat epithelial cell line IFA is a robust diagnostic assay for anti-F-actin antibody that can either replace the routine screening for actin-reactive SMA-T antibody in tissue sections or be used as a confirmatory assay for anti-F-actin antibody after screening by F-actin ELISA or on rodent tissue sections by IFA.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2010 · Pathology
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    ABSTRACT: To characterize a population of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to laboratory aspects, comparing it with other similar cohorts. Data presented are part of a prospective incident cohort study that evaluated 65 patients with early RA, followed for 36 months from the diagnosis at Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinic of Hospital Universitário de Brasília (HUB). We recorded demographics, clinical, and laboratory data relevant to the cohort initial assessment, including red blood cells, evidence of inflammatory activity, and presence of autoantibodies (rheumatoid factor (RF)), cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), and antivimentin citrullinated (anti-Sa). There was a preponderance of female (86%) with mean age of 45.6 years. Twelve patients (18.46%) had laboratory diagnosis of anemia (hemoglobin < 12 g / dL). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were above the reference value for 51 (78.46%) and 46 (70.76%) patients, respectively. Thirty-two patients (49.23%) were positive for at least one of the RF isotypes, and 28 patients (43.07%) were positive for IgA RF, 19 (29.23%) for IgG, and 32 ( 49.23%) for IgM RF, respectively; 34 patients (52.30%) were positive for at least one of the techniques used in investigation of anti-CCP (CCP2, or CCP3, or CCP3.1), while 9 (13,85%) were positive for anti-Sa. The laboratory characteristics of patients enrolled in this Brazilian cohort are similar in many respects to those of North-American, European, and Latin-American cohorts previously published.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2010 · Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia
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    ABSTRACT: The association between serological markers with the need of biological therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) is not known, with few available data addressing this question. To prospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with ERA (less than 12 months of symptoms) in order to determine the possible association between serological markers (rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), and citrullinated anti-vimentin (anti-Sa) with parameters of therapeutic outcome (this later defined by the need of introducing biological therapy). Forty patients with early RA were evaluated at the time of diagnosis and have been followed for 3 years, in use of standardized therapeutic treatment. Demographic and clinical data were recorded, as well as serology tests (ELISA) for RF (IgM, IgG and IgA), anti-CCP (CCP2, CCP3 and CCP3.1) and anti-Sa in the initial evaluation and at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months of follow-up. As outcomes of the RA development, the need or not for biological therapy during the follow-up period were considered. Comparisons were made through the Student t test, mixed-effects regression analysis and analysis of variance (significance level of 5%). The mean age was 45 (+/- 12) years; a female predominance was observed (90%). At the time of diagnosis, RF was observed in 50% of cases (RF IgA - 42%, RF IgG - 30% and RF IgM - 50%), anti-CCP in 50% (no difference between CCP2, CCP3 and CCP3. 1) and anti-Sa in 10%. After 3 years, no change in the RF prevalence neither in the anti-CCP was observed, but the anti-Sa increased to 17.5% (p = 0.001). Biological therapy was necessary in 22.5% of patients. The mean RF IgA and anti-CCP 2 levels during the 3 years were higher among patients who needed biological therapy (p <0.05 for both). Higher titles of RF and anti-CCP over time were associated with the need for biological therapy.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2010 · Acta reumatologica portuguesa
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    ABSTRACT: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of various autoantibodies, including anti-centromere, anti-topoisomerase (Scl-70), anti-PM/Scl-100, and anti-RNA-polymerase III (RNA Pol-III) antibodies. Recently, new ELISA based immunoassays have become available for the detection of anti-PM/Scl and anti-RNA Pol-lII antibodies. We studied the prevalence and clinical association of anti-PM/Scl-100 (PM1-Alpha) and anti-RNA Pol-III antibodies. Antibodies to PM1-Alpha and RNA Pol-III were measured by ELISA (DR. Fooke Laboratories and Inova Diagnostics, respectively) in 242 patients with various connective tissue diseases (CTD) (including 70 SSc patients) and in 36 non-CTD controls. Low levels of PM1-Alpha antibodies were found in various CTDs, whereas high levels were exclusively found in SSc, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, albeit at low frequency (4.7%). Anti-RNA Pol-III antibodies were found in 7% of SSc and in 1% of non-CTD and CTD controls. Anti-centromere and anti-Scl-70 antibodies were found in 37% and 21% of SSc patients, respectively. Anti-centromere antibodies were associated with limited cutaneous SSc and anti-Scl-70 antibodies with diffuse cutaneous SSc and interstitial lung disease. Because of the low number of samples positive for anti-PM/Scl-100 or RNA Pol-III antibodies, no clinical feature was statistically correlated with the presence of either reactivity, but taken together the presence of either antibody was correlated with interstitial lung disease. Anti-PM1-Alpha and anti-RNA Pol-III antibodies were mutually exclusive with anti-Scl-70 antibodies. At high levels, anti-PM/Scl-100 antibodies were associated with SSc, PM, and DM, albeit at low frequency. Anti-RNA Pol-III antibodies were associated with SSc (in 7%) with high specificity.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2010 · Clinica chimica acta; international journal of clinical chemistry

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Pathology

Publication Stats

980 Citations
140.71 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003-2014
    • INOVA Diagnostics
      San Diego, California, United States
  • 2011
    • University of Brasília
      • Faculty of Medicine
      Brasília, Federal District, Brazil
    • Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2006
    • Mayo Clinic - Rochester
      • Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
      Rochester, MN, United States
  • 1991-1996
    • The Scripps Research Institute
      • Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine
      La Jolla, California, United States