S De Stefani

Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modène, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

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Publications (75)180.86 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Study Type – Therapy (outcome) Level of Evidence 2b What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Upper Urinary Tract (UUT) Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC) is an uncommon disease and represents approximately 5% of all urothelial carcinomas. We report our series on 73 patients treated with Kidney Sparing Surgery for UUT TCC. Good results have been achieved in terms of oncological outcome comparing this conservative approach to the radical nephrourectomy.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2012 · BJU International
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    ABSTRACT: We introduce the diagnostic complexity of a testicular metastasis by signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of unknown origin. Testicular metastases are a rare event but, particular after 50 years of age, a testicular mass could represent a metastasis.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · Andrologia

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2010 · European Urology Supplements
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    ABSTRACT: Giant genital haemangiomas are rare occurrences. Once properly diagnosed, they should be managed by surgery with wide and deep margins. We present a clinical case and provide suggestions for diagnosis and treatment of this unusual pathology.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2009 · Pathologica
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    ABSTRACT: Ureteral catheters are important devices in the management of upper urinary tract obstruction; severe complications due to insertion or stent permanence are unusual. We report the clinical case and management of a knotted ureteral stent in an 83-year-old man.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2009 · Urological Research
  • M.C. Sighinolfi · S Micali · M Grande · A Mofferdin · S De Stefani · G Bianchi
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study is to consider the feasibility and the results of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) in an elderly cohort of patients, considering different diseases and concomitant morbidity. From January 2003 up to July 2006, a total of 1100 SWL treatments were performed in our Stone Centre with Dornier Lithotripter S device. We retrospectively analyzed all the treatments carried out in patients older than 70 years of age, collecting a total of 130 patients. The average age was 75.1 years (range: 70-89). Stone location was renal in 95 and ureteral in 45 patients. Information about SWL outcomes and complications were collected as well as patient's characteristics and treatment modalities. Average stone size was 10.2+/-3.4 and 8.7+/-3.1 for the renal and ureteral location, respectively. 73 out of 140 patients (52.1%) were stone free after a single treatment; 49 patients (35%) required an adjunctive session, whereas SWL was unsuccessful in 18 (12.8%) patients. We observed 64, 24, 21, 10, 31 cases of concomitant arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, solitary kidney condition and previous neoplastic pathologies. A total of 8 and 6 subjects had previous cardiac surgery and atrial fibrillation respectively, thus requiring a warfarin scheduled conversion to low molecular weight heparin. Five patients had a pace maker implant and three patients an abdominal aortic aneurism. No SWL-related complications were found in this series considering both urological and systemic features. SWL represents the treatment of choice for urolithiasis, and it has to be recommended especially to geriatric patients. In those subjects, SWL complications can be avoided with a proper and personalized preparation, together with an ECG and ultrasound continuously monitored procedure.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2008 · Journal of endourology / Endourological Society
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    ABSTRACT: Bladder catheterization is a common practice after several surgical procedures; a wrong trans-urethral catheter position can affect the outcomes of some urological maneuvers. We assess with a physical model the variation of intra-vesical pressures due to different locations of the catheter. Using a plastic bag fulfilled with 5l of normal saline, we try to reproduce bladder condition assessing pressures in case of catheter located over or under the thigh. In case of catheter over the thigh, the flow of liquid is not allowed, and only a pressure of 23 cm of water induces the passage of fluid. A wrong catheter position may adversely affect intravesical pressures; this finding has to be taken into consideration, especially when dealing with post-urological surgery catheterization.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2008 · Maturitas
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    ABSTRACT: Scrotal liposarcoma is an uncommon disease, usually found after the fifth decade. We describe the case of a well-differentiated scrotal liposarcoma associated with a considerable inflammatory reaction, treated with surgical ablation.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2008 · Andrologia
  • M. C. Sighinolfi · S. Micali · S. De Stefani · G. Bianchi

    No preview · Article · Jul 2008 · International braz j urol
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    ABSTRACT: Intravesical catheter knotting represents a rare event, especially described in paediatric literature. We report a case of a catheter knot, occurring in an 80-year-old woman, managed by means of sustained traction.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2008 · Maturitas
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    ABSTRACT: Background Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) represents noninvasive management of urolithiasis. Since the first HM3 model, technological progress has improved the efficacy and safety of this treatment. The current study aimed to evaluate the role of ESWL as a first-line emergency therapy of renal colic due to ureteral stone with impaired renal function. Methods This prospective study enrolled all the patients admitted from the emergency room with acute renal colic meeting the following criteria: serum creatinine level ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 mg/dl, hydronephrosis, ureteral stones 6 to 15 mm in size, body mass index less than 30, normal renal function at baseline, and no evidence of urinary tract infection. The patients were submitted to a single-session emergency treatment using Dornier Litothripter S. Follow-up assessment, performed at 24 and 72 h, included radiologic and ultrasound examinations with renal function serum assessment. The end points were a decrease in creatinine level and a stone-free condition. Results A total of 40 patients were eligible for the study. The mean creatinine level at admission was 1.93 ± 0.26 mg/dl. After the treatment, renal function recovery occurred for 34 subjects (85%), with a significant global decrease in creatinine levels (p = 0.00). The global stone-free rate 72 h after SWL was 67.5% (27/40). The patients with residual fragments were managed using re-SWL (n = 7) and endoscopic technique (n = 6). Conclusions Emergency SWL represents an effective tool in the treatment of ureteral stones with hydronephrosis and slight renal impairment. Although complete stone clearance after one treatment still remains a difficult target, the actual role of SWL in the management of acute obstruction is to obtain ureteral canalization and renal function recovery.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2008 · Surgical Endoscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) represents noninvasive management of urolithiasis. Since the first HM3 model, technological progress has improved the efficacy and safety of this treatment. The current study aimed to evaluate the role of ESWL as a first-line emergency therapy of renal colic due to ureteral stone with impaired renal function. This prospective study enrolled all the patients admitted from the emergency room with acute renal colic meeting the following criteria: serum creatinine level ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 mg/dl, hydronephrosis, ureteral stones 6 to 15 mm in size, body mass index less than 30, normal renal function at baseline, and no evidence of urinary tract infection. The patients were submitted to a single-session emergency treatment using Dornier Litothripter S. Follow-up assessment, performed at 24 and 72 h, included radiologic and ultrasound examinations with renal function serum assessment. The end points were a decrease in creatinine level and a stone-free condition. A total of 40 patients were eligible for the study. The mean creatinine level at admission was 1.93 +/- 0.26 mg/dl. After the treatment, renal function recovery occurred for 34 subjects (85%), with a significant global decrease in creatinine levels (p = 0.00). The global stone-free rate 72 h after SWL was 67.5% (27/40). The patients with residual fragments were managed using re-SWL (n = 7) and endoscopic technique (n = 6). Emergency SWL represents an effective tool in the treatment of ureteral stones with hydronephrosis and slight renal impairment. Although complete stone clearance after one treatment still remains a difficult target, the actual role of SWL in the management of acute obstruction is to obtain ureteral canalization and renal function recovery.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2008 · Surgical Endoscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Ureteral stents are common devices in urological practice. However, a stent may provoke lower urinary tract symptoms that severely affect quality of life. We evaluated the relationship between ureteral stents and male erection/female sexuality. A total of 30 men and 20 women undergoing ureteral stent positioning were considered. Patients affected by risk factors for erectile dysfunction or hormonal and metabolic alterations were excluded. Hystero-ovariectomy and menopause were considered exclusion criteria. Three questionnaires were administered before stenting and 45 to 60 days after stent positioning, including the International Prostate Symptom Score, the International Index of Erectile Function-5 for men and the Female Sexual Function Index for women. Mean age was 45 years in men and 39 years in women. The mean+/-SD International Index of Erectile Function-5 score was 23.2+/-1.27 and the mean Female Sexual Function Index score was 32.15+/-2.71 before stent positioning. No lower urinary tract symptoms were reported before the procedure. After the ureteral stent was indwelling the mean International Index of Erectile Function-5 score was 13.5+/-4.01 and the mean Female Sexual Function Index score was 23.6+/-14.66 (p=0.000 and 0.007, respectively). Of 30 men 25 reported a pathological International Index of Erectile Function-5 score and 6 of 20 women denied any sexual activity due to stent related anxiety, resulting in the minimum Female Sexual Function Index score. In the remaining 14 women sexual life was not significantly impaired by the ureteral stent (p=0.08). Ureteral stents impaired the quality of sexual life in male and female subjects. In men the most important distress was in regard to erectile function, probably related to lower urinary tract symptoms. Conversely female sexuality appeared to be severely impaired due to stent related psychological concerns.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2007 · The Journal of Urology
  • S Micali · M Grande · M C Sighinolfi · S De Stefani · G Bianchi
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    ABSTRACT: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is currently considered one of the main treatments for ureteral stones. Some studies have reported the effectiveness of pharmacologic therapies (calcium antagonists or alpha-blockers) in facilitating ureteral stone expulsion after ESWL. We prospectively evaluated the efficacy, after ESWL, of nifedipine on upper-middle ureteral stones, and tamsulosin on lower ureteral stones, both associated to ketoprofene as anti-edema agent. From January 2003 to March 2005 we prospectively evaluated 113 patients affected by radiopaque or radiolucent ureteral stones. Average stone size was 10.16 +/- 2.00 mm (range 6-14 mm). Thirty-seven stones were located in the upper ureter, 27 in the middle ureter, and 49 in the lower ureter. All patients received a single session of ESWL (mean number of shock waves: 3,500) by means of a Dornier Lithotripter S (mean energy power for each treatment: 84%). Both ultrasound and X-ray were used for stone scanning. After treatment, 63 of 113 patients were submitted to medical therapy to aid stone expulsion: nifedipine 30 mg/day for 14 days administered to 35 patients with upper-middle ureteral stones (group A1) and tamsulosin 0.4 mg/day for 14 days administered to 28 patients with stones located in the distal ureter (group A2). The remaining 50 patients were used as a control group (29 upper-middle ureteral stones-B1-and 21 lower ureteral stones-B2-), receiving only pain-relieving therapy. No significant difference in stone size between the groups defined was observed. Stone clearance was assessed 1 and 2 months after ESWL by means of KUB, ultrasound scan and/or excretory urography. A stone-free condition was defined as complete stone clearance or the presence of residual fragments smaller than 3 mm in diameter. The stone-free rates in the expulsive medical therapy group were 85.7 and 82.1% for the nifedipine (A1) and tamsulosin (A2) groups respectively; stone-free rates in the control groups were 51.7 and 57.1% (B1 and B2, respectively). Five patients (14.3%) in group A1, 5 (17.8%) in group A2, 14 (48.3%) in group B1 and 9 (42.8%) in group B2 were not stone-free after a single ESWL session and required ESWL re-treatment or an endoscopic treatment. Medical therapy following ESWL to facilitate ureteral stone expulsion results in increased 1- and 2-month stone-free rates and in a lower percentage of those needing re-treatment. The efficacy of nifedipine for the upper-mid ureteral tract associated with ketoprofene makes expulsive medical therapy suitable for improving overall outcomes of ESWL treatment for ureteral stones.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2007 · Urological Research
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy on erectile function in a cohort of male patients affected by non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Thirty male patients undergoing BCG treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer were enrolled in the study. Their mean age was 60.4 years. None of the patients had risk factors for erectile dysfunction (ED). All subjects underwent a BCG standard schedule therapy (once weekly instillation for 6 weeks). International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and International Prostate Symptom score (I-PSS) were addressed to the patients during the treatment schedule (at fourth or fifth instillation) and 1 month after the last instillation. The mean IIEF-5 score was 17.6 +/- 6.7 during therapy and 21.7 +/- 2.92 a month after the last instillation (P=0.008). Baseline ED and the association with lower urinary tract symptoms are variables significantly connected with post-treatment results (P=0.016 and 0.00 respectively) whereas the age seems not to be related to ED (P=0.256). No major side effects were recorded. It is concluded that BCG treatment is effective for prophylaxis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however, it may induce a high incidence of ED. Although this effect is transient and reversible, erectile failure is another source of psychological distress that adversely affects the quality of life of men undergoing BCG treatment.
    No preview · Article · May 2007 · Andrologia

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2007 · European Urology Supplements

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2007 · European Urology Supplements

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2007 · European Urology Supplements
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the chronologic relationship between the cessation of smoking and the restoration of erectile function. Smoking is associated with an increased risk of erectile dysfunction. Twenty active smokers (20 to 40 cigarettes/day) affected by erectile dysfunction (International Index of Erectile Function 5-item score less than 21) were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 40 years. All the patients underwent penile color Doppler ultrasonography during the basic and dynamic phases (10 microg prostaglandin E1). A second Doppler evaluation was performed 24 to 36 hours after cessation of smoking. The peak systolic velocity (PSV) and end-diastolic velocity (EDV) were recorded. The PSV and EDV cutoff value was 30 cm/s and 5 cm/s, respectively. Of the 20 patients, 10 (50%) had normal PSV values but only 5 (25%) had normal EDV values at the baseline Doppler evaluation. All the patients (100%) had normal PSV values at the second penile Doppler evaluation after smoking withdrawal, and 17 (85%) also had normal EDV values. The average PSV was 40.1 and 50.3 cm/s (P = 0.09) and the mean EDV was 6.8 and 2.4 cm/s (P <0.01) at the baseline penile Doppler examination and after smoking withdrawal, respectively. Within 24 to 36 hours of the cessation of cigarette smoking, the color Doppler parameters demonstrated a significant improvement in EDV and a trend toward an increase in PSV. Additional clinical evaluation is required to further characterize the expeditious improvement in erectile function after the cessation of smoking.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2007 · Urology
  • S Micali · M Grande · M C Sighinolfi · C De Carne · S De Stefani · G Bianchi
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    ABSTRACT: Nephrolithiasis treatment has become easier and less invasive with the development of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) and endourologic techniques. However, medical therapy represents a well-established and complementary approach that can improve the efficacy of SWL and endourology. During recent decades, pharmacologic intervention has become more effective in stone disease: drugs can control the pain of renal colic, interfere at various levels in lithogenesis, and contribute to the expulsion of stones. It is well known that lithogenesis is a multifactorial process influenced by environmental-nutritional factors (low urinary volume, diet rich in animal protein, etc) and metabolic alterations; i.e., hypercalciuria, hyperuricosuria, and deficiency of stone-inhibiting factors (citrate, magnesium, glycosaminoglycans [GAGs]). Specific drugs such as citrate, allopurinol, and thiazide represent highly effective treatments for the promoting factors. Furthermore, recent findings suggest an interesting role for a phytotherapeutic agent, Phillantus niruri, and its inhibitory action on calcium oxalate crystallization related to the higher incorporation of GAGs into the calculi. Another step forward in medical management of stone disease is expulsive therapy. Many studies have proven the efficacy of medical expulsive therapy with nifedipine and alpha-blockers: their specific action on ureteral smooth muscle in association with anti-edema drugs accounts for their efficacy in expelling ureteral stones. In this paper, we provide an update on the medical treatment of stone disease, focusing our attention on what is known and what is new in renal colic and litholithic and expulsive medical therapy.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2006 · Journal of Endourology

Publication Stats

723 Citations
180.86 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004-2012
    • Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia
      Modène, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
  • 1995-2002
    • Università degli Studi di Trieste
      • • Department of Medicine, Surgery and Health Sciences
      • • Unit of Dental Sciences and Biomaterials
      Trst, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy
  • 1983-1987
    • Università degli Studi di Sassari
      Sassari, Sardinia, Italy