Ben Davidson

Oslo University Hospital, Kristiania (historical), Oslo, Norway

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Publications (302)1199.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To compare the microRNA (miRNA) profiles of uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS), and to compare the miRNA signatures of primary and metastatic uterine LMS. Methods: Eight primary LMS, 9 primary ESS and 8 metastatic LMS were analyzed for miRNA profiles using TaqMan Human miRNA Array Cards. Findings for 20 differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in a series of 44 uterine sarcomas (9 primary uterine ESS, 17 primary uterine LMS, 18 metastatic LMS) using qPCR. Frizzled-6 protein expression was analyzed in 30 LMS (15 primary, 15 metastases). Frizzled-6 was silenced in SK-LMS-1 uterine LMS cells using siRNA and the effect on invasion, wound healing and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was assessed. Results: Ninety-four miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in ESS and LMS, of which 76 were overexpressed in ESS and 18 overexpressed in LMS. Forty-nine miRNAs were differentially expressed in primary and metastatic LMS, of which 45 were overexpressed in primary LMS and 4 in metastases. Differential expression was confirmed for 10/20 miRNA analyzed using qPCR. Frizzled-6 silencing in SK-LMS-1 cells significantly inhibited cellular invasion, wound healing and MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Differential miRNA signatures of ESS and LMS provide novel data regarding transcriptional regulation in these cancers, based on which new potential diagnostic markers, prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets may be explored. Differences in miRNA profiles of primary and metastatic LMS may improve our understanding of disease progression in this aggressive malignancy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Gynecologic Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: We introduce a novel per-gene measure of intra-gene DNA methylation variability (IGV) based on the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 platform, which is prognostic independently of well-known predictors of clinical outcome. Using IGV, we derive a robust gene-panel prognostic signature for ovarian cancer (OC, n = 221), which validates in two independent data sets from Mayo Clinic (n = 198) and TCGA (n = 358), with significance of p = 0.004 in both sets. The OC prognostic signature gene-panel is comprised of four gene groups, which represent distinct biological processes. We show the IGV measurements of these gene groups are most likely a reflection of a mixture of intra-tumour heterogeneity and transcription factor (TF) binding/activity. IGV can be used to predict clinical outcome in patients individually, providing a surrogate read-out of hard-to-measure disease processes.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and clinical role of 14 genes previously shown to be associated with chemotherapy response and/or progression-free survival in a smaller series of ovarian serous carcinoma effusions. Advanced-stage serous ovarian carcinoma effusions (n = 150) were analyzed for mRNA expression of AKR1C1, ABCA4, ABCA13, ABCB10, BIRC6, CASP9, CIAPIN1, FAS, MGMT, MUTYH, POLH, SRC, TBRKB and XPA using quantitative real-time PCR. mRNA expression was studied for association with clinicopathologic parameters, including chemotherapy response and survival. ABCA4 mRNA expression was significantly related to better (complete) chemotherapy response at diagnosis in the entire cohort (p = 0.018), whereas higher POLH mRNA levels were significantly related to better chemoresponse at diagnosis in analysis to 58 patients with pre-chemotherapy effusions treated with standard chemotherapy (carboplatin + paclitaxel; p = 0.023). In univariate survival analysis for patients with pre-chemotherapy effusions (n = 77), CIAPIN1 mRNA expression was significantly related to shorter overall (p = 0.007) and progression-free (p = 0.038) survival, whereas ABCA13 mRNA expression was significantly related to shorter OS (p = 0.024). Higher CIAPIN1 mRNA expression was an independent marker of poor overall survival in Cox multivariate analysis (p = 0.044). Our data identify ABCA4 and POLH as markers of better chemotherapy response in metastatic serous carcinoma. CIAPIN1 and ABCA13 may be novel markers of poor outcome in pre-chemotherapy serous carcinoma effusions.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Molecular Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Understanding carboplatin resistance in ovarian cancer is critical for the improvement of patients' lives. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells or an aggravated epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype of a cancer are integrally involved in pathways conferring chemo-resistance. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA) is involved in mesenchymal stem cell fate and cancer biology. Methods: We analyzed HOTAIR expression and associated surrogate DNA methylation (DNAme) in 134 primary ovarian cancer cases (63 received carboplatin, 55 received cisplatin and 16 no chemotherapy). We validated our findings by HOTAIR expression and DNAme analysis in a multicentre setting of five additional sets, encompassing 946 ovarian cancers. Chemo-sensitivity has been assessed in cell culture experiments. Results: HOTAIR expression was significantly associated with poor survival in carboplatin-treated patients with adjusted hazard ratios for death of 3.64 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.78-7.42; P < 0.001) in the discovery and 1.63 (95 % CI 1.04-2.56; P = 0.032) in the validation set. This effect was not seen in patients who did not receive carboplatin (0.97 [95 % CI 0.52-1.80; P = 0.932]). HOTAIR expression or its surrogate DNAme signature predicted poor outcome in all additional sets of carboplatin-treated ovarian cancer patients while HOTAIR expressors responded preferentially to cisplatin (multivariate interaction P = 0.008). Conclusions: Non-coding RNA HOTAIR or its more stable DNAme surrogate may indicate the presence of a subset of cells which confer resistance to carboplatin and can serve as (1) a marker to personalise treatment and (2) a novel target to overcome carboplatin resistance.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Genome Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Cellular proteins are subject to frequent methylation on lysine residues, introduced by specific methyltransferases, and each lysine residue can receive up to three methyl groups. Histone methylations, which are key determinants of chromatin state and transcriptional status, have been subject to particularly intense studies, but methylations on non-histone protein substrates are also abundant and biologically significant. Numerous studies have addressed lysine methylation in the realm of cancer biology. A recent study used an antibody-based approach to investigate the methylation of Lys-561 of the stress-inducible Hsp70 protein HSPA1, focusing exclusively on dimethylated HSPA1, concluding that it was elevated in cancer [Cho et al. (2012), Nat. Commun.,3, 1072]. In the present study, we have performed a more extensive analysis of HSPA1 methylation status in cancer samples, using protein mass spectrometry. We found that the four methylation states of Lys561 on HSPA1 (un-, mono-, di- and trimethylated) could be measured accurately and reproducibly in samples from carcinomas. We investigated HSPA1 methylation in 70 effusions, representing 53 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas and 17 breast carcinomas. Notably, we found the trimethylated form of HSPA1 to be predominant in the cancer samples. HSPA1 methylation was studied for association with clinicopathologic parameters, including chemotherapy response and survival. The trimethylated form was more prevalent in breast carcinoma effusions (p = 0.014), whereas the dimethylated (p = 0.025), monomethylated (p = 0.004) and unmethylated (p = 0.021) forms were overrepresented in the ovarian carcinomas. For the ovarian carcinomas, the monomethylated (p = 0.028) and unmethylated (p = 0.007) forms were significantly related to the presence of higher residual disease volume, while the unmethylated form was significantly associated with poor overall (p = 0.015) and progression-free (p = 0.012) survival. In conclusion, lysine methylation of HSPA1 differs between metastatic breast and ovarian carcinoma, and unmethylated HSPA1 shows potential as a prognostic marker in high-grade serous carcinoma.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to analyze the expression and clinical role of the RNA-binding molecule HuR in metastatic high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma (HGSC). HUR mRNA expression by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was analyzed in 66 effusions from patients diagnosed with HGSC. Protein expression was analyzed in 262 HGSC effusions using immunohistochemistry. HUR mRNA was detected in all 66 effusions. HUR mRNA levels were unrelated to clinicopathological parameters. However, higher HUR mRNA levels were significantly related to poor overall survival in the entire cohort (P=.023), as well as in analysis limited to patients with prechemotherapy primary diagnosis specimens (P=.001) in univariate analysis. Cox multivariate analysis showed an independent prognostic role for HUR mRNA in the entire cohort (P=.033) and in patients with prechemotherapy primary diagnosis specimens (P=.002). HuR protein was detected in the nucleus and cytoplasm of tumor cells in 258 (98%) of 262 and 153 (58%) of 262 effusions, respectively. Higher HuR protein expression was associated with higher serum Cancer Antigen (CA) 125 levels at diagnosis (P=.01), but its presence at both cellular compartments was otherwise unrelated to clinicopathological parameters or survival. In conclusion, HuR is widely expressed in metastatic HGSC at both the mRNA and protein level. Higher HUR mRNA levels are associated with poor survival in metastatic HGSC, whereas protein expression has no prognostic value.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Human pathology
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to analyze the diagnostic role of MMP-7 in effusion cytology. Effusions (n = 356), consisting of 307 carcinomas (184 ovarian, 55 breast, 32 lung, 36 carcinomas of other origin) and 49 malignant mesotheliomas, were analyzed for MMP-7 expression using immunohistochemistry. MMP-7 was expressed in 124/307 (40%) carcinomas and was uniformly absent in malignant mesotheliomas (0/49; 0%; P < .001). Reactive mesothelial cells were similarly MMP-7 negative in all carcinoma specimens. In carcinomas, expression was most frequent in tumors of ovarian and other female genital (cervical and endometrial) origin (P < .001). The sensitivity and specificity of this marker in the differential diagnosis between high-grade serous carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma were 46% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, MMP-7 expression is highly specific, though only of moderate sensitivity, for the diagnosis of carcinoma in the differential diagnosis from both benign and malignant mesothelial cells.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Human pathology
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    Dataset: 2015source

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Cancer Research
  • Hadil Onalla · Claes Tropé · Reuven Reich · Ben Davidson

    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Cancer Research
  • michal chehover · Claes Tropé · Reuven Reich · Ben Davidson

    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: To validate our earlier observation that 11 chemoresistance-associated mRNAs are molecular markers of poor overall survival in ovarian serous carcinoma. Ovarian serous carcinomas (n=112) and solid metastases (n=63; total=175) were analyzed for mRNA expression of APC, BAG3, EGFR, S100A10, ITGAE, MAPK3, TAP1, BNIP3, MMP9, FASLG and GPX3 using quantitative real-time PCR. mRNA expression was studied for association with clinicopathologic parameters and survival. Tumor heterogeneity was assessed in 20 cases with >1 specimen per patient. APC, BAG3, S100A10 and ERK1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry was analyzed in 58 specimens (38 primary carcinomas, 20 metastases). BAG3 (p=0.013), TAP1 (p=0.014), BNIP3 (p<0.001) and MMP9 (p=0.036) were overexpressed in primary tumors, whereas S100A10 (p=0.027) and FASLG (p=0.006) were overexpressed in metastases. Analysis of patient-matched primary carcinomas and metastases showed overexpression of APC (p=0.022), MAPK3 (p=0.002) and BNIP3 (p=0.004) in the former. In primary carcinomas, higher APC (p=0.003) and MAPK3 (p=0.005) levels were related to less favorable chemoresponse. Higher S100A10 (p=0.029) and MAPK3 (p=0.041) levels were related to primary chemoresistance. Higher BAG3 (p=0.026) and APC (p=0.046) levels in primary carcinomas were significantly related to poor overall survival in univariate, though not in multivariate survival analysis. S100A10 protein expression was related to poor chemoresponse (p=0.002) and shorter overall (p=0.005) and progression-free (p<0.001) survival, the latter finding retained in multivariate analysis (p=0.035). Our data provide evidence of heterogeneity in ovarian serous carcinoma and identify APC, MAPK3, BAG3 and S100A10 as potential biomarkers of poor chemotherapy response and/or poor outcome in this cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Gynecologic Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To provide practical guidelines for the cytopathologic diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma.Data SourcesCytopathologists with an interest in the field involved in the International Mesothelioma Interest Group (IMIG) and the International Academy of Cytology (IAC) contributed to this update. Reference material includes peer-reviewed publications and textbooks.RationaleThis article is the result of discussions during and after the IMIG 2012 conference in Boston, followed by thorough discussions during the 2013 IAC meeting in Paris. Additional contributions have been obtained from cytopathologists and scientists who could not attend these meetings, with final discussions and input during the IMIG 2014 conference in Cape Town. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2015;43:563–576. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Diagnostic Cytopathology
  • Betina Katz · Claes G. Tropé · Reuven Reich · Ben Davidson
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    ABSTRACT: Ovarian cancer, consisting predominantly of ovarian carcinoma, is the eighth most common cancer in women and the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Efforts focus on identifying biomarkers which may aid in early diagnosis and reduce mortality, as well as on characterizing therapeutic targets with the aim of circumventing chemoresistance and prolonging survival at advanced-stage disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, and have been found to play an important role in ovarian carcinoma. Recent research has identified multiple miRNAs involved in the biology and progression of the disease, and supports a role for miRNAs as potential biomarkers, predictive markers and prognostic factors. Many of the studies published to date nevertheless suffer from critical weaknesses which affect data quality and reproducibility, including the comparison of normal ovaries to tumor tissue without compensation for the highly discrepant target cell fraction in these two specimen types and the inclusion of carcinomas of different histotypes, non-epithelial tumors or tumors of non-specified histology. These shortcomings highlight the critical role of pathologists as part of the team in the setting of such research. This review summarizes current knowledge in this area and discusses the potential clinical relevance of miRNAs in ovarian carcinoma, with focus on studies of clinical specimens in which tissue selection has been deemed adequate. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Human pathology
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    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive pathological report is essential for optimal patient management, cancer staging and prognostication. In many countries, proforma reports are used but these vary in their content. The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting (ICCR) is an alliance formed by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, the Royal College of Pathologists of the United Kingdom, the College of American Pathologists, the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and the European Society of Pathology, with the aim of developing an evidence-based reporting data set for each cancer site. This will reduce the global burden of cancer data set development and reduplication of effort by different international institutions that commission, publish and maintain standardised cancer reporting data sets. The resultant standardisation of cancer reporting will benefit not only those countries directly involved in the collaboration but also others not in a position to develop their own data sets. We describe the development of a cancer data set by the ICCR expert panel for the reporting of primary ovarian, fallopian tube and peritoneal carcinoma and present the 'required' and 'recommended' elements to be included in the report with an explanatory commentary. This data set encompasses the recent International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists staging system for these neoplasms and the updated World Health Organisation Classification of Tumours of the Female Reproductive Organs. The data set also addresses issues about site assignment of the primary tumour in high-grade serous carcinomas and proposes a scoring system for the assessment of tumour response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The widespread implementation of this data set will facilitate consistent and accurate data collection, comparison of epidemiological and pathological parameters between different populations, facilitate research and hopefully will result in improved patient management.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Modern Pathology
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    ABSTRACT: Resistance to chemotherapy represents a major obstacle for long-term remission, and effective strategies to overcome drug resistance would have significant clinical impact. We report that recurrent ovarian carcinomas after paclitaxel/carboplatin treatment have higher levels of spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) and phospho-SYK. In vitro, paclitaxel-resistant cells expressed higher SYK, and the ratio of phospho-SYK/SYK positively associated with paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Inactivation of SYK by inhibitors or gene knockdown sensitized paclitaxel cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the phosphotyrosine proteome in paclitaxel-resistant tumor cells revealed that SYK phosphorylates tubulins and microtubule-associated proteins. Inhibition of SYK enhanced microtubule stability in paclitaxel-resistant tumor cells that were otherwise insensitive. Thus, targeting SYK pathway is a promising strategy to enhance paclitaxel response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Cancer cell
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To provide practical guidelines for the cytopathologic diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma.Data SourcesCytopathologists with an interest in the field involved in the International Mesothelioma Interest Group (IMIG) and the International Academy of Cytology (IAC) contributed to this update. Reference material includes peer-reviewed publications and textbooks.RationaleThis article is the result of discussions during and after the IMIG 2012 conference in Boston, followed by thorough discussions during the 2013 IAC meeting in Paris. Additional contributions have been obtained from cytopathologists and scientists who could not attend these meetings, with final discussions and input during the IMIG 2014 conference in Cape Town.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Cytopathology
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    ABSTRACT: Malignant tumors of the vulva account for only 5% of cancers of the female genital tract in the USA. The most frequent cancers of the vulva are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and malignant melanoma (MM). Little is known about the genetic aberrations carried by these tumors. We report a detailed study of 25 vulva tumors [22 SCC, 2 MM, 1 atypical squamous cell hyperplasia (AH)] analyzed for expression of the high-mobility group AT-hook family member genes HMGA2 and HMGA1, for mutations in the IDH1, IDH2 and TERT genes, and for methylation of the MGMT promoter. The RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses showed that HMGA2 was expressed in the great majority of analyzed samples (20 out of 24; SCC as well as MM) but not in the normal controls. HMGA1, on the other hand, was expressed in both tumors and normal tissues. Five of the 24 tumors (all SCC) showed the C228T mutation in the TERT promoter. Our results showed that HMGA2 and TERT may be of importance in the genesis and/or the progression of tumors of the vulva.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Oncology Reports
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    ABSTRACT: To provide practical guidelines for the cytopathologic diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma. Cytopathologists with an interest in the field involved in the International Mesothelioma Interest Group (IMIG) and the International Academy of Cytology (IAC) contributed to this update. Reference material includes peer-reviewed publications and textbooks. This article is the result of discussions during and after the IMIG 2012 conference in Boston, followed by thorough discussions during the 2013 IAC meeting in Paris. Additional contributions have been obtained from cytopathologists and scientists who could not attend these meetings, with final discussions and input during the IMIG 2014 conference in Cape Town. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Acta cytologica
  • Ben Davidson
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    ABSTRACT: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a clinically aggressive tumor originating from mesothelial cells, which line the serosal cavities. Recent years have seen extensive research aimed at identifying new therapeutic targets, predictive markers and prognostic factors in this disease. These include both serum and tissue markers, and are related to multiple cellular pathways which affect cell survival, proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, interaction with the immune response and DNA repair. Several of these molecules may become relevant for pathologists as part of the effort to select patient sub-populations for targeted therapy in the future. This review summarizes current data in this area and discusses their potential clinical relevance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Human pathology

Publication Stats

7k Citations
1,199.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009-2015
    • Oslo University Hospital
      • Department of Pathology
      Kristiania (historical), Oslo, Norway
    • Cancer Registry of Norway
      Kristiania (historical), Oslo, Norway
  • 1999-2015
    • University of Oslo
      • • Institute of Clinical Medicine
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Department of Pathology (PAT)
      • • Department of Pharmacy
      Kristiania (historical), Oslo, Norway
  • 1999-2009
    • Tel Aviv University
      • Department of Pathology
      Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • 2004
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • Laboratory of Pathology
      베서스다, Maryland, United States
  • 2003
    • Karolinska University Hospital
      Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 1999-2003
    • Hebrew University of Jerusalem
      • Faculty of Medicine
      Jerusalem, Jerusalem District, Israel
  • 2000
    • Det Norske Veritas
      Kristiania (historical), Oslo, Norway
  • 1997-1999
    • Sheba Medical Center
      • Department of Pathology
      Gan, Tel Aviv, Israel