Yuichi Ando

Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan

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Publications (134)800.67 Total impact

  • Bishal Gyawali · Akiko Ota · Yuichi Ando
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: In the article on the CheckMate 057 trial, Borghaei et al. (Oct. 22 issue)(1) provide data on overall and progression-free survival among patients with advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer who were receiving either nivolumab or docetaxel. In this trial, docetaxel initially appeared to have better outcomes than nivolumab, but the trends were reversed after 9 months (Fig. 1 of the article, available at NEJM.org). In such instances in which hazard functions for two treatment groups cross during the study follow-up, it is not clear how to interpret the observed hazard ratios of 0.73 for death and 0.92 . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Chemotherapy, in combination with a local treatment, has a role in nearly all the settings of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LAHNSCC) treatment: as definitive, adjuvant or induction therapy. However, despite many years of trials, controversies still exist regarding the best approach to using chemotherapy in the multi-modal treatment of LAHNSCC. Opinions are divided on sequential versus concurrent use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for unresectable LAHNSCC. More debate exists on whether the addition of induction chemotherapy to concomitant chemoradiotherapy is clinically meaningful. After the approval of cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy for this disease, making treatment choices have become further complicated. Although new data from trials are arriving every year, the results have been inconclusive. In this review, we provide the readers with the latest information on various strategies of using chemotherapy and cetuximab that will help to make an evidence-based decision in the treatment of LAHNSCC, including the approach to larynx preservation. We conclude that with the available information, concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be preferred over induction chemotherapy, except in the setting of larynx preservation. Furthermore, given the paucity of positive data and severe financial toxicity associated with cetuximab, concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be the preferred choice over cetuximab-radiotherapy. Future trials in head and neck cancer should be properly planned to address these controversies and provide clear solutions.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer Treatment Reviews
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    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2016
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    ABSTRACT: Low skeletal muscle density (SMD) and low skeletal muscle index (SMI) are associated with poor overall survival (OS) in patients with various types of cancer. We retrospectively studied SMD and SMI using computed tomographic (CT) scans in patients with gastric cancer receiving chemotherapy to evaluate its prognostic significance. SMD and SMI were obtained from CT-based analysis using Slice-O-Matic® medical imaging software in patients who received S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy for metastatic gastric cancer. The CT images taken within 1 month before starting chemotherapy were used. The cut-off values for determining low SMD [<33 Hounsfield units (HU) in obese and <41 HU in non-obese patients] and low SMI (<41 cm2/m2 in females, <43 cm2/m2 in non-obese males and <53 cm2/m2 in obese males) were referenced from a large population based study. The CT images of 53 patients were reviewed. The median SMD was 36.8 HU (range, 19.5-59.3 HU), and the median SMI was 39.8 cm2/m2 (range, 23.7-60.0 cm2/m2). Patients with low SMD had significantly shorter OS compared with patients having normal SMD (8.9 vs. 12.8 months, P=0.03). However, OS did not differ significantly between patients with low and normal SMI (11.1 and 14.3 months, P=0.18). Multivariate analyses confirmed that low SMD was an independent predictor of poor outcomes (P<0.01). SMD is an important prognosticator of survival in patients with metastatic gastric cancer receiving chemotherapy.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Oncology Reports
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    Kazunori Honda · Bishal Gyawali · Yuichi Ando

    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · The Lancet Oncology

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Dec 2015
  • Ayumu Matsuoka · Osamu Maeda · Yuichi Ando

    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Lancet Oncology

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: A clear consensus does not exist about whether the initial dose of gemcitabine, an essential anticancer antimetabolite, should be reduced in patients with liver dysfunction. Adult patients with biliary tract or pancreatic cancer were divided into 3 groups according to whether they had mild, moderate, or severe liver dysfunction, evaluated on the basis of serum bilirubin and liver transaminase levels at baseline. As anticancer treatment, gemcitabine at a dose of 800 mg/m(2) or 1,000 mg/m(2) was given as an intravenous infusion once weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle. The patients were prospectively evaluated for adverse events during the first cycle, and the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and its inactive metabolite, difluorodeoxyuridine (dFdU), were studied to determine the optimal initial dose of gemcitabine as monotherapy according to the severity of liver dysfunction. A total of 15 patients were studied. Liver dysfunction was mild in 1 patient, moderate in 6, and severe in 8. All 15 patients had been undergoing biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice when they received gemcitabine. Grade 3 cholangitis developed in 1 patient with moderate liver dysfunction who received gemcitabine at the dose level of 1,000 mg/m(2) . No other patients had severe treatment-related adverse events resulting in the omission or discontinuation of gemcitabine treatment. The plasma concentrations of gemcitabine and dFdU were similar among the groups. An initial dose reduction of gemcitabine as monotherapy for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancers is not necessary for patients with hyperbilirubinemia, provided that obstructive jaundice is well managed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Cancer Science
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    Bishal Gyawali · Tomoya Shimokata · Yuichi Ando

    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · The Lancet Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: FOLFIRINOX is a standard chemotherapeutic regimen for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who have a good performance status. In this study, we present the case of a 64yearold male who developed dysarthria following FOLFIRINOX treatment, and review all four cases of dysarthria encountered among the nine patients who received this treatment in our hospital. In all cases, dysarthria occurred during the infusion of irinotecan in the first course of treatment, persisted for several hours, and then resolved rapidly without any sequelae. Physical and neurological examinations at the onset of dysarthria revealed no other abnormalities. Imaging studies revealed no abnormal findings. Atropine was prophylactically administered in the second and subsequent courses of treatment and effectively prevented or alleviated dysarthria. This acute neurological symptom is surprising and uncommon in traditional cancer chemotherapy, and medical oncologists may initially suspect the onset of stroke or cerebrovascular disease. However, consistent with our experience, all reported cases resolved completely, with no need for dose reduction or treatment interruption.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Oncology letters
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    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Annals of Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a very troublesome, difficult to manage and a nearly universal complication of chronic opioid use to control pain associated with advanced illness. Some studies have reported that OIC is so intolerable in some patients that they skip their opioid medications and bear pain instead of OIC. Laxatives have commonly been used as a prophylaxis and treatment of OIC but they are frequently ineffective because the commonly available laxatives do not target the underlying mechanism of OIC, which is the blockade of peripheral mu-receptors. Recently, there have been a number of advances in the treatment of OIC, which any physician involved with opioid-prescribing discipline should be aware of. This review will update the new options and strategies available for treating OIC along with the relevant clinical trials. Finally, this review also provides a recommendation on the preferred way to approach a patient with OIC in the modern era as well as highlight on the importance of doctor-patient communication in this setting.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
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    ABSTRACT: Granular cell tumors are uncommon, usually benign tumors of Schwann cell origin. The malignant variant is extremely rare, representing <2% of all granular cell tumors. Therefore, standard systemic chemotherapy for this disease does not exist. The present study reports the case of a 40-year-old female with a malignant granular cell tumor that originally arose in the right orbit and subsequently relapsed. The patient was started on pazopanib monotherapy following treatment with two investigational drugs, a smoothened inhibitor and then a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, as part of a clinical trial. Although additional radiotherapy for local control was necessary, the lung metastases remained stable during the pazopanib monotherapy, which lasted for 7 months, following which a clinically stable disease state was determined. This case suggests that pazopanib can be a treatment option for the stabilization of disease progression in metastatic malignant granular cell tumor.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Oncology letters
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    ABSTRACT: The Calvert formula was derived from the study among patients with glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) of 33-135 ml/min, and it remains unclear whether the formula can be used to calculate optimal and safe dosages of carboplatin in patients with severe renal insufficiency. We evaluated the utility of this formula in patients with severe renal insufficiency. For pharmacokinetic analysis, we studied nine adult Japanese patients with advanced cancer who had an estimated GFR of lower than 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), as calculated by the Japanese equation for estimating GFR, or who were receiving hemodialysis. The dose of carboplatin was calculated with the Calvert formula, in which GFR was measured by inulin clearance or was assumed to be 0 in patients requiring hemodialysis. Hemodialysis was started 23 h after the end of carboplatin infusion. Although there was a significant correlation between the estimated and measured carboplatin clearance, the estimated clearance was consistently higher than the measured clearance [mean prediction error ± standard deviation = 41.0 ± 26.3 %] in all seven patients with renal insufficiency (GFR, median 21.4, range 7.8-31.4 ml/min) and in the two hemodialysis patients. Actual areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC) (mg/ml min) were 5.4, 5.7, 6.2, and 9.0 for the four patients with a target AUC (mg/ml min) of 5; 5.7, 6.2, and 7.1 for the three patients with a target AUC (mg/ml min) of 4; and 5.1 and 8.7 for the two hemodialysis patients with a target AUC (mg/ml min) of 5. The measured clearance of carboplatin ranged from 23.0 to 51.3 ml/min in the seven patients not receiving hemodialysis. The pre-hemodialysis carboplatin clearance in the hemodialysis patients was 20.5 and 11.1 ml/min, respectively. For adult patients with severe renal insufficiency, the Calvert formula causes carboplatin overdosing by overestimating the carboplatin clearance.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of low-dose chemotherapy with methotrexate (MTX) and vinblastine (VBL) for patients with desmoid tumors refractory to meloxicam treatment, focusing in particular on the relationship between the efficacy of this chemotherapy and catenin β-1 (CTNNB1) mutation status. Since March 2003, patients pathologically diagnosed with extraperitoneal desmoid tumors have been prospectively treated with meloxicam, a COX-2 inhibitor, at our institution. Patients with inoperable tumors who were resistant to meloxicam treatment underwent MTX and VBL therapy every other week. The responses of all patients were evaluated, and factors that were correlated with efficacy were analyzed, including CTNNB1 mutation status. Sixty-eight patients were prospectively treated with meloxicam. MTX + VBL therapy was administered in 15 patients. Six patients showed a partial response. Only one patient presented disease progression. A few patients showed grade 3-4 treatment-related toxicity with the administration of MTX and VBL every other week. Intriguingly, CTNNB1 status did not affect the efficacy of this treatment. MTX and VBL treatment every other week is well tolerated and achieved a favorable response in patients resistant to meloxicam treatment, regardless of CTNNB1 mutation status.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · International Journal of Clinical Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) evaluation is significant for drug dosing of carboplatin, anticancer drug excreted mainly from kidney. Serum cystatin-C (sCys-C) is a GFR marker with little affected by body muscle mass volume. And GFR equations based on serum creatinine (eGFRcreat) and sCys-C (eGFRcys) were developed; however, accuracy of eGFRcys has not been elucidated fully among patients with cancer. Therefore, we analyzed the performance of GFR equations among patients with cancer whose GFR values were measured by inulin clearance (Cin). Study design was a cross-sectional study. Subjects were 41 patients with cancer whose GFR values were measured by Cin for drug dosing studies of carboplatin or S-1 in Nagoya University Hospital from 2007 to 2010 and 29 non-cancer patients. Correlation with Cin and slope of regression line were evaluated in eGFRcreat and eGFRcys. Single and multiple regression analyses were analyzed to identify associating factors with eGFRcreat/Cin or eGFRcys/Cin. Age, body weight, body mass index (BMI) and sCr were different between cancer patients and non-cancer patients, but sCys-C and Cin were consistent in 2 groups. The slope of the regression line for Cin vs. eGFRcys with zero intercept in cancer patients was 1.10 (95 % CI: 1.02-1.17), which was significantly different from 1.0. In multiple regression analysis revealed that BMI and urinary creatinine excretion were significantly associated with eGFRcreat/Cin, and cancer was only associating factor with eGFRcys/Cin. eGFRcys should not be used for evaluation of renal function in patients with cancer because it underestimates GFR.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Clinical and Experimental Nephrology
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    ABSTRACT: In Asians, the risk of irinotecan-induced severe toxicities is related in part to UGT1A1*6 (UGT, UDP glucuronosyltransferase) and UGT1A1*28, variant alleles that reduce the elimination of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. We prospectively studied the relation between the UGT1A1 genotype and the safety of irinotecan-based regimens in Japanese patients with advanced colorectal cancer, and then constructed a nomogram for predicting the risk of severe neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. Safety data were obtained from 1312 patients monitored during the first 3 cycles of irinotecan-based regimen in a prospective observational study. In development of the nomogram, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to test the associations of candidate factors to severe neutropenia in the first cycle. The final nomogram based on the results of multivariable analysis was constructed and validated internally using a bootstrapping technique and externally in an independent data set (n=350). The UGT1A1 genotype was confirmed to be associated with increased risks of irinotecan-induced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and diarrhoea. The final nomogram included type of regimen, administered dose of irinotecan, gender, age, UGT1A1 genotype, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, pre-treatment absolute neutrophil count, and total bilirubin level. The model was validated both internally (bootstrap-adjusted concordance index, 0.69) and externally (concordance index, 0.70). Our nomogram can be used before treatment to accurately predict the probability of irinotecan-induced severe neutropenia in the first cycle of therapy. Additional studies should evaluate the effect of nomogram-guided dosing on efficacy in patients receiving irinotecan.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication 16 April 2015. doi:10.1038/bjc.2015.122 www.bjcancer.com.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · British Journal of Cancer
  • Yukiko Kato · Yuichi Ando

    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine
  • Ayumu Matsuoka · Osamu Maeda · Yuichi Ando

    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · New England Journal of Medicine

Publication Stats

3k Citations
800.67 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996-2015
    • Nagoya University
      • • Division of Clinical Oncology and Chemotherapy
      • • Division of of Internal Medicine
      • • Division of General Medicine
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
  • 2014
    • Aichi Gakuin University
      • School of Pharmacy
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
  • 2004-2011
    • Saitama Medical University
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Saitama, Saitama, Japan
  • 2003
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Center for Cancer Research
      Maryland, United States
  • 2002-2003
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • Center for Cancer Research
      Maryland, United States
    • NCI-Frederick
      Фредерик, Maryland, United States
  • 1995
    • Nagoya Second Red Cross Hospital
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan