Franco Borgogno

Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Piedmont, Italy

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Publications (20)2.49 Total impact

  • Chapter: Tabù
    Franco Borgogno · Gabriele Cassullo

    No preview · Chapter · Jul 2013
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a bird's eye view – almost a “table of contents” – of “Ferenczi and otherness”, and will do so by first suggesting, right from the beginning, that Ferenczi himself as author represents a symbol of “otherness” in the history of psychoanalysis.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2012 · International Forum of Psychoanalysis
  • Gabriele Cassullo · Franco Borgogno

    No preview · Book · Nov 2011
  • Franco Borgogno · Francesco Capello
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the author aims to highlight why Ferenczi is the "introjective psychoanalyst" par excellence in the history of psychoanalysis. Employing the approach to classic psychoanalytic texts adopted in his book Psychoanalysis as a Journey, he explores and discusses a number of crucial theoretical and clinical issues that, throughout Ferenczi's life and works, shaped his development in this direction. In doing so, the author also maintains that this specific characteristic of his analytic commitment is the main reason why today we still look at Ferenczi as a source of inspiration and a contemporary teacher. In his argument, the author focuses particularly on Ferenczi's early and late writings in order to illustrate more clearly the development of his "introjective" analytic style. He leaves for another paper the equally interesting subject of the evolution of Ferenczi's ideas on the phenomena of imitation, incorporation, and identification that follow the process of introjection.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · American Imago
  • Source
    Francesco Capello · Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: The author discusses how psychoanalysis can be transmitted to today’s students in order to arouse and develop their sustained interest. The significance of this issue is paramount in view not only of the current “crisis” in psychoanalysis but also of the lack of research on this subject—a lacuna possibly connected with Freud’s original ambivalence towards academia. The author begins his argument by discussing Freud’s ideas outlined in “Some Elementary Lessons in Psychoanalysis.” He then goes on to describe in detail the methodology he has adopted in his teaching practice, as well as the different stages of its development. Finally, he illustrates his reasons for choosing this method both in a Tavistock-style school of child psychotherapy and in his university courses with postgraduate and advanced students of clinical psychology.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2011 · American Imago
  • Franco Borgogno · Gabriele Cassullo
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    ABSTRACT: “Who?, where?, what?, in which way?, to whom?” – besides being the questions Paula Heimann suggested that any analyst should ask him- or herself while exploring the patient's communications, these are also the main issues the authors addressed through the results of their survey on the present state of the relationship between psychoanalysis and universities in Europe. This is a pilot study that tries to chart a map of European psychoanalysts (for the moment including only members of the International Psychoanalytic Society) working at various levels in universities. The aim is to set up a network between them for starting a debate on shared problems, hopes, and anxieties relating to the future of psychoanalysis in academia.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2010 · International Forum of Psychoanalysis
  • Franco Borgogno · Gabriele Cassullo
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    ABSTRACT: This article arises from the need to "present" (that is, to read again in a "present and actual" light) the paper, "Why Analysts Need Their Patients' Transferences" by Charles Rycroft (which first appeared in 1993 and is re-published in this Special Issue), and is therefore strictly connected to the ideas the latter contains. The authors, on the one hand, outline the stages of the journey that took Rycroft to elaborate the concept of "ablation of the parental images", and on the other, retrace his personal "analytic genealogy" and discover a "missing forefather", Sándor Ferenczi, who has represented for a long time a direct "missing link" in the history of psychoanalysis.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2010 · The American Journal of Psychoanalysis
  • Marco Conci · Franco Borgogno

    No preview · Article · Jun 2009 · International Forum of Psychoanalysis
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    Franco Borgogno · Massimo Vigna-Taglianti
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    ABSTRACT: Within a clinical-theoretical framework focused on transference-countertransference dynamics, the authors reflect on role-reversal and on the reasons it has been neglected for a long time in literature. This primitive inter- and intra-psychic process, often at the forefront in our practice, will be discussed in its principal aspects (patient's unconscious identification with parents' psychic culture and concomitant dissociation of the infant part of the self), signaling how the enactment can be an inevitable element which, putting into play the past dissociated object relationships, becomes a source of mutative understanding.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2009 · The American Journal of Psychoanalysis
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the author's main focus is on “role reversal: ”a primitive inter-intra-psychic process at the forefront of our current psychoanalytic practice, but not sufficiently theorised in our literature. The dynamics of “role reversal” are clinically presented and discussed in their two main aspects (the unconscious identification with the parents and with their psychic culture, and therefore the concomitant dissociation of the infant part of the self) through the presentation of analytic material regarding a typical “role reversal” case. Furthermore, the author explores some of the reasons why analysts have not underlined this particular form of repetition, which is above all re-enacted in the transference-countertransference play with patients who have experienced in their past a cumulative trauma, suggesting in conclusion the curative factors in this kind of treatment.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2008 · International Forum of Psychoanalysis
  • Franco Borgogno

    No preview · Article · May 2008 · The International Journal of Psychoanalysis
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reexamines the analysis of "Little Hans" one hundred years after its first publication. In the light of what we now know about the patient's family environment and his subsequent life and career, a broadened viewpoint is offered from which to observe his childhood analysis and the nature of his psychic suffering. The case of Little Hans represents a turning point in the early days of psychoanalysis as regards both Freud's greater ability to identify with the particular needs of the patient and his achieving at the same time a more mature function of "listening to listening" as an analyst. However, in narrating the case history, Freud overlooks the important role played by the specific family environment in the pathogenesis of Hans's phobia and his psychic growth as an adult. In this connection, the possible reasons that caused Freud to conceal the facts available to him about the psychological characteristics of Hans's family, and especially the atmosphere of "fights inside the parental couple" that marked Hans's early development, are also considered.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2008 · American Imago
  • Franco Borgogno

    No preview · Article · Mar 2008 · The American Journal of Psychoanalysis
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this paper is to present the close link between Ferenczi's and Winnicott's theoretical, clinical and therapeutic thought, indicating how this link has become something of a "missing link" in the history of psychoanalytic ideas, an implication which we retain, in part, to this day. In the first part entitled "Who's speaking to whom?", I aim to explore the contents of the most essential parts of their messages, stressing the similarities and differences between them, and citing the most important authors whom they address (Freud for Ferenczi, Klein for Winnicott). In the second part, I aim to tackle the general direction underlying both their work and their lives, concentrating specifically on "the maternal", and examining the repercussions of this aspect on psychoanalytic technique and practice. In the third part, as a kind of "Parting", I will present further brief conclusions on the relevance and significance of their thoughts in modern day psychoanalysis, defining Ferenczi and Winnicott as "founders of future discursiveness".
    No preview · Article · Oct 2007 · The American Journal of Psychoanalysis
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, I am going to limit myself to tracing a map of the principal points in Ferenczi's thinking concerning trauma. Ferenczi's contribution to trauma theory is fundamental, even though up to today--in spite of the recent "Ferenczian Renaissance"--it still remains for many psychoanalysts simply not acknowledged and not considered and, when it is acknowledged and considered, it is frequently misunderstood or reported only in part. Perhaps this is because passages of his theory are extrapolated without knowing his entire clinical theoretical way or because he is quoted through others without the authors having personally read his work. These last ones are typical habits, as we know, to project one's own ideas, especially our prejudices.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2007 · The American Journal of Psychoanalysis
  • Carlo Bonomi · Franco Borgogno

    No preview · Article · Jan 2006 · International Forum of Psychoanalysis
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: In reply to Altman's and Schellekes's questions and discussion, the author explores in more depth his own theoretical-technical point of view in order to clarify—chiefly in the light of a modern application of Ferenczi's and Heimann's way of thinking—the rationale for the selection of clinical facts in his paper.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2005 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: What patients mainly want—which Ferenczi noted as early as 1932 in his clinical diary and which Bion later expressed in his Cogitations (1992)—and what some patients need, is to experience how the analyst lives and processes the interpersonal events that lie at the origin of their affective and mental suffering. This is especially true with schizoid patients who were profoundly emotionally deprived in childhood. In this paper, the author investigates this crucial aspect of the intersubjective analytic relationship in his treatment of just such a patient, an extremely silent and inert young woman. Through a detailed examination of clinical material from various stages of her analysis, he explores how the analyst’s unconscious emotional response serves as both a tool for comprehension and a key element of environmental facilitation—a “new beginning,” to use Balint’s phrase—that may help the patient attain a level of development and emancipation that he or she has never experienced before.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2004 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: A society undergoing rapid change, which doubts its own possibilities of survival, calls into question the worth of psychoanalytical theory and practice. The author emphasizes that the Ferenczian clinical evolution could be a source of inspiration for reinvigorating our trust in the prodromes of the Freudian paradigm, and thus for relaunching the authoritativeness of our thought and our psychotherapeutic method. In this light the author examines the affective and cognitive qualities that render Ferenczi a mentor of our possible future development, taking into consideration the following aspects: the communicative and intersubjective perspective that denotes Ferenczi's thought since his first writings; the receptive, reflective, and self‐reflective capacities which have progressively accompanied his own commitment and clinical attitude; and his elective work on trauma and “the traumatic”, including the algogenic messages transmitted during the healing process by analysts in fear (and perhaps terror) of their own regression and countertransferential catastrophe. In particular, these last events (central in the Ferenczian vision) are today specifically stimulated by new forms of pathology which search for, with our help, a resolution of the apathetic pain and the tearing apart of the identity that characterize the suffering of patients.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2004 · International Forum of Psychoanalysis
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: The object of this paper is the Elasticity of Psychoanalytic Technique in the work of Sándor Ferenczi. The author sustains that this can be considered neither as an ultimate arrival point nor as a particular stage of Ferenczi's clinical-theoretical body of work, but rather as an ensemble of affective qualities, attitudes and values, which he gradually developed through experience, signalling a paradigm shift in the history of psychoanalysis. The following areas will be explored: the new sensitivity demonstrated by Ferenczi concerning the relational and communicative factors present in the analytic session, his subtle and acute attention to the participation of the analyst's own subjectivity in the therapeutic process, and how these enduring elements of Ferenczi's technique anticipate several significant future developments in psychoanalysis.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2002 · The American Journal of Psychoanalysis

Publication Stats

74 Citations
2.49 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002-2010
    • Università degli Studi di Torino
      • Dipartimento di Psicologia
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy