Daiki Fujii

Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama, Japan

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Publications (11)12.73 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We herein report a novel compound heterozygous mutation of the acid α-glucosidase (GAA) gene in a 23-year-old man with adult-onset Pompe disease. The patient was admitted for respiratory failure and a highly elevated serum level of creatine kinase (CK). His muscle pathology did not show typical vacuolated fibers; however, globular inclusion bodies with acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was observed. A molecular genetic analysis of the GAA gene revealed a novel compound heterozygous mutation, c.1544 T>A (M515K), combined with a previously reported mutation, c.1309 C>T (R437C). The presence of ACP-positive globular inclusion bodies is a useful diagnostic marker for adult-onset Pompe disease, even when typical vacuolated fibers are absent.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Internal Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: We report a 72-year-old woman with overlapping Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE). She developed diplopia and unsteady gait a week after an upper respiratory infection on day 1. She had weakness of both upper limbs on day 3 and became drowsy, and her respiratory status worsened on day 5. Neurologic examination revealed ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, symmetrical weakness, areflexia, and consciousness disturbance. We diagnosed her with MFS on day 1, GBS on day 3 and overlapping BBE on day 5. She underwent immunoadsorption therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Ten months after onset, her symptoms had fully recovered. Anti-GM1 IgG, GD1a IgG, GQ1b IgG, and GT1a IgG antibodies were positive. Our case supports the notion that MFS, GBS, and BBE are all part of a continuous clinical spectrum, which is an antibody-mediated process.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2012 · Case Reports in Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: We report novel compound heterozygous mutations of the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase and N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) gene, c.302G>A (p.R101H) and c.617-4A>G, in a Japanese family with distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) presenting with slow progression. The three patients could stand and walk even 36, 34, and 39 years after onset, respectively, although affected individuals become wheelchair bound on average 12 years after onset of the disease. The clinical spectrum of DMRV seems to be wider than previously thought in terms of both the clinical course and the severity of the disease.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012 · Case Reports in Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: We report the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) therapy in a 38-year-old patient who was later diagnosed with unilateral moyamoya syndrome. The patient had a sudden onset of unconsciousness, vomiting, dysarthria, and tetraparesis. A neurologic examination revealed consciousness disturbance, right central facial nerve palsy, dysarthria, and tetraparesis with bilateral exotropia and horizontal gaze palsy. A magnetic resonance imaging scan on admission did not reveal fresh cerebral infarction or hemorrhage, but magnetic resonance angiography revealed severe stenosis at the terminal portion of left internal carotid artery, the anterior cerebral arteries, and the right vertebral artery. We suspected infarction of brain stem. The patient was treated with intravenous t-PA approximately 2.5 hours after onset, and the patient demonstrated a remarkable recovery 1 day after onset and had only a minimal deficit at discharge (12 days after onset). Cerebral angiography 7 days after onset confirmed the diagnosis of moyamoya disease. The present case suggests that therapeutic intravenous t-PA may be applicable for an acute ischemic stroke patient coexisting with moyamoya disease after careful evaluation and discussion with patient and family.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2012 · Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases: the official journal of National Stroke Association
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    ABSTRACT: We report 2 cases that were considered to be neuro-Sweet disease. They initially manifested with meningoencephalitis and no skin lesions, and rapidly improved with corticosteroid therapy. In both cases, patients complained of meningitic symptoms such as fever and headache, and HLA-B54 and -Cw1 turned out to be positive over the clinical course. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed increased levels of lymphocytes and protein. In case #1, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) showed high-intensity signals in the right dorsal medulla oblongata, bilateral dorsal midbrain, and left thalamus. In case #2, FLAIR and DWI showed high-intensity signals in the bilateral cerebellar cortex and left caudate nucleus. Symptoms and MRI images were markedly improved in both cases after corticosteroid pulse therapy. According to published diagnostic criteria, these 2 cases were considered possible neuro-Sweet disease. These cases suggest that the combination of meningoencephalitis and HLA specificity is important to consider the possibility of neuro-Sweet disease, even without skin lesions.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Neurology International
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the correlation between the systemic blood pressure profile and cardiac (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we monitored circadian blood pressure patterns of 37 PD patients of 49 to 85 years of age (mean, 71.8±8.4 years) using a portable blood pressure monitoring device. The duration of PD was 0.5 to 15 years, and the disability level (modified Hoehn and Yahr stage) ranged from 1.0 to 4.0 (mean, 2.7±0.7). There were 37 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Cardiac MIBG scintigraphy was performed for the 37 PD patients. Based on the nocturnal fall in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), we classified patients into extreme dippers (nocturnal reduction of MABP >20%), dippers (>10% but <20%), nondippers (<10% but >0%), and inverted dippers (<0%). Average 24-hour MABP values revealed reduced BP variability in PD patients. The percentage nocturnal fall in MABP was significantly different between PD patients and control subjects (p<0.05). Significant correlations were found between % MABP reduction and the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio on early and delayed images (p<0.01). The UPDR motor score, early and delay H/M ratios were also significantly different between patients who were and were not dippers (p<0.05). The present results reported for the first time a significant correlation between the systemic blood pressure profile and cardiac (123)I-MIBG uptake in patients with PD. The degeneration between the brainstem and the postganglionic neurons of myocardial sympathetic nerves may progress in parallel in patients with PD.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · Journal of the neurological sciences
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    ABSTRACT: We report serial changes of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with V180I mutation (CJD180). DWI abnormalities in our patient were more predominantly observed in the left cerebral cortex than left basal ganglia. Hemilateral abnormalities progressed over 5 months to involve the contralateral side with increasing DWI signals. At 6 months, SPECT showed hypoperfusion in the left parietal and frontal lobes and the hypoperfusion region spread to the bilateral basal ganglia, right parietal and frontal lobes. SPECT imaging revealed marked cerebral blood flow reduction, predominantly in the cerebral cortex corresponding to brain areas with high-intensity DWI signals. During the follow-up period of CJD180, DWI was more sensitive than conventional FLAIR and T2-weighted images (T2WI) to detect and monitor the progression of abnormal hyperintense lesions. We suggest that serial DWI and SPECT findings are useful for not only early diagnosis of CJD but also for monitoring disease progression.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2011 · Journal of the neurological sciences
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    ABSTRACT: We report a 41-year-old woman with Scheie syndrome diagnosed after cerebral infarction. She presented with acute onset dysarthria and right upper limb weakness. The neurologic findings revealed dysarthria, right central facial paralysis, mild right hemiparesis, and mild sensory impairment in the right arm and leg. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed subtle high signal lesions in the left corona radiata and posterior limb of the internal capsule. The diagnosis was made by a coarse facial appearance, claw hands, pigmentary degeneration of the bilateral retinas, and a deficiency of the enzymatic activity of lysosomal α-L-iduronidase. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) followed by enzyme replacement therapy. The prognosis of this disease would improve with enzyme replacement therapy. It is necessary to be aware of cerebral infarction in patients with Scheie syndrome.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases: the official journal of National Stroke Association
  • Y. Manabe · D. Fujii · S. Kono · H. Narai · N. Omori · K. Monma · I. Nishino · K. Abe

    No preview · Article · Oct 2010 · Neuromuscular Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: We report a 61-year-old Japanese woman with transthyretin (TTR) Val33-related familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP). She presented with late-onset, vitreous involvement as the initial manifestation, slow development of polyneuropathy, cardiomyopathy, and severe autonomic failure without carpal tunnel syndrome. Liver transplantation was performed and her postoperative course was stable. Taken together with previous reports, vitreous opacities seem to be common to Val33 FAP. Vitreous amyloidosis is usually seen in combination with the involvement of other visceral organs. The findings in the present case emphasize that vitreous opacities could be the first manifestation of FAP.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2010 · Internal Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: We report a case of 30-year-old man presenting chorea in his legs. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan showed bilateral symmetric calcifications in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum and subcortical white matter. Laboratory studies showed no abnormalities of serum calcium, phosphate, PTH, lactic acid, pyruvic acid and cerebrospinal fluid. Under the diagnosis of Fahr's disease (FD), we treated with quetiapine (75 mg/day), which completely abolished his symptoms and he showed no other side effect. Our experience suggests that quetiapine is well tolerated in FD patients and effectively treats chorea without extrapyramidal movement.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2009 · Clinical Medicine: Case Reports