Osamu Yamato

Kagoshima University, Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan

Are you Osamu Yamato?

Claim your profile

Publications (143)184.39 Total impact

  • Mariko Sawa · Akira Yabuki · Asuka Setoguchi · Osamu Yamato
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Immunophenotyping of canine and feline lymphoma to determine B-cell or T-cell origin is important for predicting prognosis and for development of treatment protocols. For advanced diagnostic cytology tests that can be performed on smears are required to predict the immunophenotype of lymphomas. Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a multiple immunofluorescence (MIF) staining method for the determination of lymphocyte immunophenotype in cytologic specimens, and to evaluate its clinical utility. Methods: B cells and T cells were detected using anti-CD79α and anti-CD3 antibodies, respectively, followed by specific fluorescence-labeled secondary antibodies. The MIF staining method was first developed using fresh-frozen sections of normal canine lymph nodes. The optimal fixative, the necessity of antigen retrieval (AR), and the optimal concentration of the antibodies were determined. The MIF method was then applied to smears of normal lymph nodes, and to clinical samples from dogs and cats with lymphoma. The MIF results were compared to genetic clonality results. Results: B and T cells were detected based on specific fluorescence in frozen sections, using formalin fixation without AR. Specific fluorescence was also detected in smears from normal lymph nodes and lymphomas, and the immunophenotypes predicted from this MIF staining method completely corresponded to those from genetic clonality analysis. Conclusions: The MIF staining method that we developed in this study effectively distinguished lymphocyte immunophenotypes with high specificity and sensitivity using a single smear sample, and was useful as a diagnostic tool for canine and feline lymphoma.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Veterinary Clinical Pathology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy is a rare form of canine glomerular disease. This report describes a case of canine IgA nephropathy showing characteristics typical of human IgA nephropathy. An 8-year-old, spayed female Miniature Dachshund showed persistent severe proteinuria without azotemia. She was receiving long-term glucocorticoid therapy due to chronic gastritis and an intra-abdominal suture granuloma. A renal biopsy demonstrated mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with predominantly mesangial IgA deposition and electron-dense deposits in the paramesangium. These findings closely resembled those of human IgA nephropathy. Glucocorticoid treatment was discontinued, and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril was administrated as an antiproteinuric agent. The proteinuria subsequently went into remission, and the patient has maintained good condition without recurrence.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Science
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Science
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease, SD) is a fatal, progressive, neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by simultaneous deficiencies of acid β-hexosaminidases A and B. Canine SD has so far been identified only in two purebreeds. In this article, we present the case of a 10 mo old, male dog of mixed breed that developed progressive neurological signs including ataxia, postural deficit, and visual deficits and finally died at the age of 21 mo. The dog was diagnosed with SD on the basis of the results of biochemical and histopathological analyses. This is the third report of canine SD and the first time it has been identified in a mixed breed.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that is mainly produced by the stomach. The kidney is a major source of local ghrelin, and maintaining body fluid balance is considered a critical role of renal ghrelin. However, there are no reports on ghrelin in small animal medicine. The present study investigated the intrarenal localization of and change in ghrelin expression in dogs with immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN). Ghrelin immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in the distal tubules of normal kidneys. Ghrelin IR was weak in ICGN kidneys and the quantitative ghrelin IR score was significantly lower in ICGN kidneys than in normal kidneys. In cases of ICGN, plasma creatinine concentrations showed a positive correlation with the ghrelin IR score.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Science
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A male Japanese domestic cat with retarded growth in Hokkaido, Japan, showed progressive motor dysfunction, such as ataxia starting at 3 months of age and tremors, visual disorder and seizure after 4 months of age. Finally, the cat died of neurological deterioration at 9 months of age. Approximately half of the peripheral blood lymphocytes had multiple abnormal vacuoles. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bisymmetrical hyperintensity in the white matter of the parietal and occipital lobes in the forebrain on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images, and mild encephalatrophy of the olfactory bulbs and temporal lobes. The activity of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase in leukocytes was negligible, resulting in the biochemical diagnosis of GM1 gangliosidosis. Histologically, swollen neurons characterized by accumulation of pale, slightly granular cytoplasmic materials were observed throughout the central nervous system. Dysmyelination or demyelination and gemistocytic astrocytosis were observed in the white matter. Ultrastructually, membranous cytoplasmic bodies were detected in the lysosomes of neurons. However, genetic analysis did not identify the c.1448G>C mutation, which is the single known mutation of feline GM1 gangliosidosis, suggesting that the cat was affected with a new variant of the feline disease.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Science
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder that has recently been linked to mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. We generated a polyclonal antibody against canine SOD1 to further characterize the mutant SOD1 protein and its involvement in DM pathogenesis. This antibody (SYN3554) was highly specific to canine SOD1 and had the ability to reveal distinct cytoplasmic aggregates in cultured cells expressing canine mutant SOD1 and also in the spinal neurons of symptomatic homozygotes. A similar staining pattern was observed in asymptomatic homozygotes. SOD1 aggregates were not detected in the spinal neurons of heterozygotes; the accumulation of SOD1 was also detected in the reactive astrocytes of homozygotes and heterozygotes to a similar extent. Our results support the hypothesis that the cytoplasmic accumulation and aggregate formation of the mutant SOD1 protein, especially in astrocytes, are closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM. Therefore, this disease is regarded as a spontaneous large-animal model of SOD1-mediated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in humans. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Neuroscience
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease frequently found in Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) dogs, and it has clinical and pathologic similarities to human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Autophagy is a major intracellular protein degradation system. Abnormalities of autophagy-resulting in cell death through mechanisms called type II programmed cell death-have recently been reported to occur in various neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Thus, the distribution and expression levels of proteins involved in autophagy were examined in the spinal cords of 8 PWC dogs suffering from DM with superoxide dismutase mutation, 5 non-DM PWC dogs, and 6 Beagle dogs without neurologic signs. There was no significant difference in the ratio of neurons with microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-positive somata relative to those that were LC3 negative among the 3 groups, whereas the number of LC3-positive neurites was significantly increased in DM dogs. Punctate LC3 immunoreactivity did not colocalize with a lysosome marker, LAMP2 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2). NBR1 (neighbor of BRCA gene 1) was localized mostly in reactive astrocytes, whereas there were p62 (p62/A170/SQSTM1)-positive foci in the neuropil of the spinal cord of DM dogs. Western blotting revealed in DM dogs the decreased expression of Beclin1 and Atg16 L, which are molecules involved in formation of the isolation membrane. These findings suggest that altered autophagosome degradation may result in LC3 and p62 accumulation in the DM spinal cord, whereas the early stage of membrane formation is likely to be downregulated. © The Author(s) 2015.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Veterinary Pathology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is an inherited glycolytic erythroenzymopathy caused by mutations of the PKLR gene. A causative mutation of the feline PKLR gene was originally identified in Abyssinian and Somali cats in the U.S.A. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR genotyping assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening for this mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of four popular purebred cats in Japan to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay clearly displayed all genotypes of feline PK deficiency, indicating its suitability for large-scale survey as well as diagnosis. The survey demonstrated that the mutant allele frequency in Abyssinian and Somali cats was high enough to warrant measures to control and prevent the disease. The mutant allele frequency was relatively low in Bengal and American shorthair cats; however, the testing should still be carried out to prevent the spread of the disease. In addition, PK deficiency should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of anemia in purebred cats in Japan as well as worldwide.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Science
  • A. Yabuki · M. Sawa · H.‐S. Chang · O. Yamato
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Plastic hematocrit tubes (PHTs) are convenient tools for electron microscopy (EM) of peripheral blood buffy coats, and the PHT-EM technique is expected to be a practical method for veterinary clinical medicine. In this study, fixatives composed of various concentrations of sucrose, glutaraldehyde, and phosphate buffer (PB) were tested for preparing canine and feline buffy coats. The highest quality images were obtained using a fixative consisting of 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 m PB, and it was concluded that this method allows clinicians who are inexperienced in histological techniques can conveniently transport buffy coat samples to diagnostic laboratories for analysis by EM.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Anantomia Histologia Embryologia

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · The Veterinary record
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This retrospective study aimed (1) to confirm the relationship between pre- and postpartum metabolic parameters and postpartum reproductive performance and (2) to clarify seasonal characteristics of the metabolic parameters by using our metabolic profile test (MPT) database of Japanese Black breeding herds. Evaluation 1: MPT databases of multiparous cows whose blood samples were collected at prepartum and postpartum were divided into 2 groups according to calving interval, and each MPT parameter was compared. Evaluation 2: The same MPT databases used in Evaluation 1 were divided into 2 groups according to the sampling period. Two sampling periods were defined, from July through October (summer; mean temperature during these months, mean air temperature: 26.3°C) and outside these 4 months (non-summer; mean temperature during these months, mean air temperature: 14.6°C), according to the main dietary roughage fed such as barnyard grass silage from digitaria in summer or Italian ryegrass and oats hay in non-summer months. Significant differences were found in prepartal total protein and postpartal g-glutamyltransferase in Evaluation 1. In Evaluation 2, significant differences were found in prepartal and postpartal total protein, albumin/globulin ratio, and glucose. Clear seasonal differences in MPT results emphasize the usefulness of the MPT in breeding cattle herds fed home-pasture roughage and suggest that unsatisfactory reproductive performance during hot periods reflects inadequate nutritional content of the diet and possible reduced feed intake due to heat stress.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Journal of veterinary science (Suwŏn-si, Korea)
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This report describes a case of a Chihuahua that was definitively diagnosed with neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (NCL) upon autopsy after presenting with visual disturbance as an initial clinical symptom. At the initial exam, the present case exhibited no neurological abnormalities except for visual disturbance. Ophthalmological examination indicated abnormal findings in the retrobulbar conjunctiva, cornea and optic papilla but these findings were not related to the present symptoms. Head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conducted in order to confirm central visual impairment indicated severe cerebral atrophy typical of Chihuahuas with NCL and meningeal enhancement with contrast medium. As was the case here, Chihuahuas with NCL may initially present with visual disturbance. If visual disturbance is detected in a young Chihuahua, a head MRI, which is useful for diagnosing NCL in Chihuahuas, should be quickly conducted so as to avoid misdiagnosis as an ocular disease.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2014
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    O Yamato · M Ogawa · H Nakayama · M Inaba · K Uchida · M M Uddin

    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type, T/G heterozygote, and G/G mutant homozygote to be 60.0%, 30.3%, and 9.8%, respectively, indicating that the frequency of the mutant G allele is extremely high (24.9%) in Border Collies. The results suggest that this high mutation frequency of the mutation is likely to cause a high prevalence of phenobarbital-resistant epilepsy in Border Collies.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Disease markers
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease, SD) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the HEXB gene. In canine SD, a pathogenic mutation (c.283delG) of the canine HEXB gene has been identified in toy poodles. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR genotyping assay was developed and evaluated for rapid and large-scale genotyping and screening for this mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of toy poodles in Japan to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The real-time PCR assay clearly showed all genotypes of canine SD. The assay was suitable for large-scale survey as well as diagnosis, because of its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated a carrier frequency of 0.2%, suggesting that the current mutant allele frequency is low in Japan. However, there may be population stratification in different places, because of the founder effect by some carriers. Therefore, this new assay will be useful for the prevention and control of SD in toy poodles.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Science
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study, age-dependent histological changes in the kidneys of Brown Norway rat, a strain useful for conducting aging research, were evaluated. Examination was performed at 3, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months of age. Sclerotic and hypertrophic changes of the glomeruli were observed, and quantitative scores of these changes persistently increased with age. A marginal increase in scores was observed for glomerular cystic changes and tubulointerstitial damage. Further, urothelial hyperplasia was observed in the renal papillae, particularly at 30 months of age. In conclusion, the findings of the present study demonstrate that the Brown Norway strain exhibits persistent, but mild progression of age-dependent renal histological changes.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2013 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Science
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). ACE2 is a newly identified member of the RAS. The present immunohistochemical study focused on changes in intrarenal ACE and ACE2 immunoreactivity in feline and canine chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACE immunoreactivity was predominantly observed in the brush border of the proximal tubules in dogs and cats. ACE immunoreactivity was lower in CKD kidneys than in normal kidneys, and quantitative analysis demonstrated negative correlations between ACE and renal tissue damage in dogs. ACE2 immunoreactivity was also detected in the proximal tubules; it increased or decreased with CKD in dogs, depending on the renal region assessed. The changes in ACE and ACE2 in CKD were associated with the plasma creatinine concentration in dogs. Findings from dogs with glomerulonephritis were similar to those from dogs with non-glomerulonephritis. The present study suggests that changes in the intrarenal expression of ACE and ACE2 contribute to the pathological mechanisms of canine CKD, but not to the mechanisms of feline CKD.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2013 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Science
  • Source
    M Ogawa · K Uchida · O Yamato · M Inaba · M M Uddin · H Nakayama
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is frequently found in Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) dogs. Canine DM is potentially a spontaneous animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar lesions and the involvement of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. However, the ventral horn lesion in DM has not been characterized in detail. Glutamate excitotoxicity due to deficiency of the glutamine-glutamate cycle has been implicated in neuron death in ALS. Thus, we examined 5 PWC dogs with an SOD1 mutation that were affected by DM, 5 non-DM PWC dogs, and 5 Beagle dogs without neurologic signs to assess the neuronal changes and the expression levels of 2 glial excitatory amino acid transporters (glutamate transporter 1 [GLT-1] and glutamate/aspartate transporter [GLAST]). The number of neurons in the spinal ventral horns of the DM dogs was significantly decreased, whereas no change was found in the cell size. Chromatolysis, lipofuscin-laden neurons, and marked synapse loss were also observed. GLT-1 expression was strikingly decreased in DM dogs, whereas GLAST expression showed no significant change. The results indicate that excitotoxicity related to the reduced expression of GLT-1, but not GLAST, may be involved in neuron loss in DM, as in human ALS, whereas intraneuronal events may differ between the 2 diseases.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Veterinary Pathology

Publication Stats

1k Citations
184.39 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2015
    • Kagoshima University
      • • Department of Veterinary Medicine
      • • Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
      • • Faculty of Agriculture
      Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan
  • 1999-2009
    • Hokkaido University
      • • Laboratory of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences
      • • Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine
      • • School of Veterinary Medicine
      Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan