Suresh Chandra Yadav

National Research Centre on Equines, Hissār, Haryana, India

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Publications (9)20.68 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The present immuno-diagnostic method using soluble antigens from whole cell lysate antigen for trypanosomosis have certain inherent problems like lack of standardized and reproducible antigens, as well as ethical issues due to in vivo production, that could be alleviated by in vitro production. In the present study we have identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) from T. evansi proteome. The nucleotide sequence of T. evansi HSP70 was 2116 bp, which encodes 690 amino acid residues. The phylogenetic analysis of T. evansi HSP70 showed that T. evansi occurred within Trypanosoma clade and is most closely related to T. brucei brucei and T. brucei gambiense, whereas T. congolense HSP70 laid in separate clade. The two partial HSP70 sequences (HSP-1 from N-terminal region and HSP-2 from C-terminal region) were expressed and evaluated as diagnostic antigens using experimentally infected equine serum samples. Both recombinant proteins detected antibody in immunoblot using serum samples from experimental infected donkeys with T. evansi. Recombinant HSP-2 showed comparable antibody response to Whole cell lysate (WCL) antigen in immunoblot and ELISA. The initial results indicated that HSP70 has potential to detect the T. evansi infection and needs further validation on large set of equine serum samples.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Acta Parasitologica
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    ABSTRACT: CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) stimulate immune cells from a wide spectrum of mammalian species. Class C CpG-ODN is relatively stable and has the combined immune effects of both A and B classes of CpG-ODN. Trypanosoma evansi produces the state of immuno-suppression in the infected hosts. The current chemotherapeutic agents against this parasite are limited in number and usually associated with severe side effects. The present work aimed to determine the immunostimulatory effects of CpG-ODN class C in T. evansi infected rabbits. Rabbits inoculated with CpG C and challenged with T. evansi resulted in delayed onset of clinical signs with reduced severity in comparison to that of T. evansi infected rabbits. The treatment also enhanced humoral immune responses. Histopathological findings in liver and spleen revealed enhancement of mononuclear cell infiltration and secondary B cell follicles. These results demonstrate that CpG-ODN class C, has immunostimulatory properties in rabbit model of trypanosomosis. The use of booster doses or sustained delivery of CpG-ODN will further elucidate the prolonged CpG-ODN generated immune responses.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • Rajender Kumar · Sanjay Kumar · Nitin Virmani · Suresh Chandra Yadav
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    ABSTRACT: The present study is an observation of transplacental transmission of T. evansi in a donkey neonatal foal. One experimentally infected pregnant donkey mare gave a normal birth to a foal after three months of experimental infection. No trypanosome was seen in wet blood film on microscopic examination in the experimentally infected donkey mare at time of birth of foal, however in serum a significant level of antitrypanosmal IgG antibodies in ELISA and many immunodominant polypeptide bands on immunoblotting were observed. In neonatal foal, live moving trypanosomes were observed in wet blood film just after birth before colostrum feeding. The foal serum sample (collected before colostrum feeding) was found negative in ELISA and immunoblotting indicating that IgG antibodies have not crossed placental barrier in mother donkey mare. After 24 h of birth, the clinical symptoms appeared in foal showing recumbancy, unable to stand and suckle, and poor reflexes. The foal was administered fluid therapy, but could survive only up to 36 h after birth. The study indicated transplacental transmission of T. evansi in donkey but the mechanism responsible for crossing the placental barrier need to be further elucidated.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of Equine Veterinary Science
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT: Trypanosoma evansi is the causative agent of surra, which is the most common and widespread trypansomal disease. The infection is mainly restricted to animals, but it has also been documented in human. Trypanosomes possess the thick immunogenic surface coat known as variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). The parasite modifies the VSG constantly resulting in continuous antigenic variations and thus evades the host immune response. Due to antigenic variations, vaccination against trypanosomosis is not useful. Therefore, alternate strategies to augment the immune response are required. CpG-ODN class-C has combined immune effects of both A and B classes of CpG-ODN. In this study, we observed that CpG-ODN class-C stimulated horse peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) induce the expression of interferon-α (IFN-α), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-12 and nitric oxide (NO) indicating enhanced innate immune response. We have for the first time demonstrated that co-culture of CpG-ODN with T. evansi antigen induces lymphocyte proliferative responses and result in a synergistic effect in eliciting the immune response.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · International Immunopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Trypanosoma evansi infection typically produces wasting disease, but it can also develop into a neurological or meningoencephalitis form in equids. Trypanosomiasis in horses was treated with quinapyramine sulfate, and all the 14 infected animals were recovered clinically. After clinical recovery, four animals developed a neurological form of the disease at various intervals. Two of these animals treated with diminazene aceturate recovered temporarily. Repeated attempts failed to find the parasite in the blood or the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but all of the animals were positive in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The calculation of the antibody index (AI) in the serum and the CSF and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the CSF and brain tissue were carried out to confirm the neuro-infection. We found PCR and AI analyses of the CSF to be useful tools in the diagnosis of the neurological form of trypanosomiasis when the organism cannot be found in the blood or CSF. The increased albumin quotient is indicative of barrier leakage due to neuroinflammation. The biochemical changes in the CSF due to nervous system trypanosomiasis include increases in the albumin quotient, total protein, and urea nitrogen. It seems to be the first report on relapse of the nervous form of trypanosomiasis in equids even after quinapyramine treatment in endemic areas.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Tropical Animal Health and Production

  • No preview · Patent · Sep 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Using a pharmacological inhibitor of Hsp90 in cultured malarial parasite, we have previously implicated Plasmodium falciparum Hsp90 (PfHsp90) as a drug target against malaria. In this study, we have biochemically characterized PfHsp90 in terms of its ATPase activity and interaction with its inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) and evaluated its potential as a drug target in a preclinical mouse model of malaria. In addition, we have explored the potential of Hsp90 inhibitors as drugs for the treatment of Trypanosoma infection in animals. Our studies with full-length PfHsp90 showed it to have the highest ATPase activity of all known Hsp90s; its ATPase activity was 6 times higher than that of human Hsp90. Also, GA brought about more robust inhibition of PfHsp90 ATPase activity as compared with human Hsp90. Mass spectrometric analysis of PfHsp90 expressed in P. falciparum identified a site of acetylation that overlapped with Aha1 and p23 binding domain, suggesting its role in modulating Hsp90 multichaperone complex assembly. Indeed, treatment of P. falciparum cultures with a histone deacetylase inhibitor resulted in a partial dissociation of PfHsp90 complex. Furthermore, we found a well known, semisynthetic Hsp90 inhibitor, namely 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, to be effective in attenuating parasite growth and prolonging survival in a mouse model of malaria. We also characterized GA binding to Hsp90 from another protozoan parasite, namely Trypanosoma evansi. We found 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin to potently inhibit T. evansi growth in a mouse model of trypanosomiasis. In all, our biochemical characterization, drug interaction, and animal studies supported Hsp90 as a drug target and its inhibitor as a potential drug against protozoan diseases.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of Biological Chemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Using a pharmacological inhibitor of Hsp90 in cultured malarial parasite, we have previously implicated Plasmodium falciparum Hsp90 (PfHsp90) as a drug target against malaria. In this study, we have biochemically characterized PfHsp90 in terms of its ATPase activity and interaction with its inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) and evaluated its potential as a drug target in a preclinical mouse model of malaria. In addition, we have explored the potential of Hsp90 inhibitors as drugs for the treatment of Trypanosoma infection in animals. Our studies with full-length PfHsp90 showed it to have the highest ATPase activity of all known Hsp90s; its ATPase activity was 6 times higher than that of human Hsp90. Also, GA brought about more robust inhibition of PfHsp90 ATPase activity as compared with human Hsp90. Mass spectrometric analysis of PfHsp90 expressed in P. falciparum identified a site of acetylation that overlapped with Aha1 and p23 binding domain, suggesting its role in modulating Hsp90 multichaperone complex assembly. Indeed, treatment of P. falciparum cultures with a histone deacetylase inhibitor resulted in a partial dissociation of PfHsp90 complex. Furthermore, we found a well known, semisynthetic Hsp90 inhibitor, namely 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, to be effective in attenuating parasite growth and prolonging survival in a mouse model of malaria. We also characterized GA binding to Hsp90 from another protozoan parasite, namely Trypanosoma evansi. We found 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin to potently inhibit T. evansi growth in a mouse model of trypanosomiasis. In all, our biochemical characterization, drug interaction, and animal studies supported Hsp90 as a drug target and its inhibitor as a potential drug against protozoan diseases.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of Biological Chemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called ‘surra’, cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO) prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS).
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2010 · PLoS ONE