Rosa Altisent

Universitat de Lleida, Lérida, Catalonia, Spain

Are you Rosa Altisent?

Claim your profile

Publications (15)31.97 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The strain CPA-7 of Pseudomonas graminis, isolated from apple by our group, was reported to reduce the population of foodborne pathogens in minimally processed fruit. The aim of this work was to investigate its effect on physical parameters, visual quality, enzymatic activity, vitamin C content and antioxidant activity of fresh-cut melon during refrigerated storage. CPA-7 treated or untreated fresh-cut melon was packaged under air or modified atmosphere (MAP) and stored at 5 and 10 °C for 8 days. Results showed a loss of texture during storage, above all at 10 °C. A good visual quality was observed for samples stored at 5 °C, although samples treated with the antagonistic strain CPA-7 and stored in air presented the lowest score, whereas those stored at 10 °C showed a poor visual appearance and a decrease of lightness. In general, CPA-7 treated samples presented higher POD values than untreated ones at 5 °C, and lower values at 10. °C. PPO increased during refrigerated storage regardless of the addition of the antagonist. Also, treatment with the antagonistic strain CPA-7 retained the antioxidant activity and vitamin C content of fresh-cut melon during refrigerated storage.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Postharvest Biology and Technology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The effects of various pulsed electric field (PEF) parameters on the extraction of polyacetylenes from carrot slices were investigated. Optimised conditions with regard to electric field strength (1–4 kV/cm), number of pulses (100–1500), pulse frequency (10–200 Hz) and pulse width (10–30 μs) were identified using response surface methodology (RSM) to maximise the extraction of falcarinol (FaOH), falcarindiol (FaDOH) and falcarindiol-3-acetate (FaDOAc) from carrot slices. Data obtained from RSM and experiments fitted significantly (p < 0.0001) the proposed second-order response functions with high regression coefficients (R2) ranging from 0.82 to 0.75. Maximal FaOH (188%), FaDOH (164.9%) and FaDOAc (166.8%) levels relative to untreated samples were obtained from carrot slices after applying PEF treatments at 4 kV/cm with 100 number of pulses of 10 μs at 10 Hz. The predicted values from the developed quadratic polynomial equation were in close agreement with the actual experimental values with low average mean deviations (E%) ranging from 0.68% to 3.58%.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Molecules
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The use of biopreservation is a promising technique to ensure microbial safety of fresh-cut produce. The objective of this work was to test the effectiveness of the strain CPA-7 of Pseudomonas graminis against a cocktail of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes on fresh-cut melon, and evaluate its effect on its quality during shelf-life when tested in conditions simulating commercial application. Fresh-cut melon was artificially inoculated with Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes and with or without the biopreservative strain at different concentrations and stored at 20, 10 and 5 °C. Moreover, the effect of the strain was tested in conditions simulating commercial application. Fresh-cut melon was packaged using passive modified atmosphere (MAP) and AIR conditions and stored at 5 and 10 °C. Quality of fresh-cut melon was evaluated in CPA-7 treated and untreated samples. At laboratory scale trials, P. graminis reduced Salmonella and L. monocytogenes growth on fresh-cut melon stored at 5, 10 and 20 °C. Effectiveness depended on their concentration and on storage temperature. At low pathogen concentration and 20 °C, L. monocytogenes growth was reduced between 2.1 and 5.3 log cfu g−1 units after 2 days of storage and Salmonella growth between 2.0 and 7.3 log cfu g−1 depending on CPA-7 dose. At 10 °C, similar reductions of pathogens were observed after 5 days of storage. In studies simulating commercial conditions, packaging atmosphere and temperature influenced P. graminis effectiveness, with better results in samples packaged under AIR conditions and 10 °C. Reduction of pathogen growth was <1-log unit in fresh-cut melon stored in MAP whilst it was >4-log units in AIR. Soluble solids content, titratable acidity, pH and firmness of fresh-cut melon were not significantly different in CPA-7 treated and untreated (control) melon. In general, lightness, chroma and hue values of fresh-cut melon stored in AIR decreased faster in CPA-7 samples than on control ones. At 5 °C, CPA-7 treated melon was visually scored lower than untreated melon. P. graminis has demonstrated promising results at 10 °C, which is a temperature more compromised for safety. Nevertheless more detailed studies on the modified atmosphere are required because AIR packaging is not recommended due to the rapid loss of quality.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Postharvest Biology and Technology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The development of fresh-cut apple products requires the reconsideration of cultivar selection because different characteristics are required compared with those characteristics for the fresh market. The aim of this work was to evaluate four improved cultivars (‘Modì’, ‘Ariane’, ‘Fuji Kiku 8’ and ‘Pink Lady’) and to compare these cultivars with traditional cultivars (‘Golden Smoothee’ and ‘Granny Smith’). Cultivars were evaluated according to physicochemical parameters and nutritional, enzymatic, and sensory aspects. Next, the cultivars were peeled, cut, treated with different antioxidant treatments, packaged in polypropylene trays and stored at 4 °C. After seven days of storage, physicochemical parameters and visual assessment were determined. As whole apples, the improved cultivars were notable for their sensory characteristics. Moreover, two of them (‘Modì’ and ‘Ariane’) presented the highest amount of total phenols and vitamin C, respectively. After processing and storage, certain of the improved cultivars presented better aptitude for minimal processing. For instance, ‘Modì’ showed high suitability, and ‘Fuji Kiku 8’ was notable for its sensory quality after seven days of refrigerated storage. Among antioxidant treatments that were assayed, 40 g/L NatureSeal® demonstrated the best results in terms of physicochemical parameters, visual assessment and sensory quality.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft und-Technologie
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The identification of flavor-impact compounds and potential new flavors could be assessed by incorporation of naturally occurring volatiles into juices or pulps. However, juices and pulps are not realistic representations of whole fruit, as texture plays a dominant role in consumer perception of fruit quality and affects flavor release. For this reason, the possibility of injecting flavor essences directly into pieces of fruit was explored as a model system to study consumer perceptions and preferences for novel fruit flavors. Small volumes (1 μL) of flavor essences (“tropical,” “smoked salmon,” “chocolate” and “apple”) were injected into cubes of apple tissue. Fifty-two consumers were asked how much they liked apples with these flavors before and after tasting. Liking, certainty of response and consumption intention were collected using a 9-point category scale. The study demonstrated that the injection of essences into pieces of apple tissue was a useful model for exploring consumer preferences for novel flavors and provided a good indication of what it would be like eating a whole apple with that flavor. Traditional breeding for perennial fruit crops requires investment over many years, with a substantial lag between the start of a crossing program and the delivery of a product into the marketplace. The current research highlights a new sensory approach that will contribute to the effectiveness of fruit breeding programs by providing clear targets for enhanced and novel flavors early in the product development cycle.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · Journal of Sensory Studies
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, we reported that the application of the strain CPA-7 of Pseudomonas graminis, previously isolated from apple, could reduce the population of foodborne pathogens on minimally processed (MP) apples and peaches under laboratory conditions. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to find an antioxidant treatment and a packaging atmosphere condition to improve CPA-7 efficacy in reducing a cocktail of four Salmonella and five Listeria monocytogenes strains on MP apples under simulated commercial processing. The effect of CPA-7 application on apple quality and its survival to simulated gastric stress were also evaluated. Ascorbic acid (2%, w/v) and N-acetyl-l-cysteine (1%, w/v) as antioxidant treatments reduced Salmonella, L. monocytogenes and CPA-7 recovery, meanwhile no reduction was observed with NatureSeal(®) AS1 (NS, 6%, w/v). The antagonistic strain was effective on NS-treated apple wedges stored at 10 °C with or without modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Then, in a semi-commercial assay, efficacy of CPA-7 inoculated at 10(5) and 10(7) cfu mL(-1) against Salmonella and L. monocytogenes strains on MP apples with NS and MAP and stored at 5 and 10 °C was evaluated. Although high CPA-7 concentrations/populations avoided Salmonella growth at 10 °C and lowered L. monocytogenes population increases were observed at both temperatures, the effect was not instantaneous. No effect on apple quality was detected and CPA-7 did not survived to simulated gastric stress throughout storage. Therefore, CPA-7 could avoid pathogens growth on MP apples during storage when use as part of a hurdle technology in combination with disinfection techniques, low storage temperature and MAP.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Food Microbiology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Minimally processed fruits and vegetables are ready-to-eat and do not require further treatment at home. These foods are usually stored in a modified atmosphere and should be maintained at refrigerated conditions until consumption. These fruits and vegetables can become contaminated by foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, and it has been demonstrated that current industrial sanitising washing treatments do not guarantee the total elimination of the pathogen when present. Thus, it is very important to elucidate whether pathogens are able to grow or survive during storage at different conditions. This study was conducted to determine the effect of the type of produce (escarole, carrot, pineapple or melon), package gas composition (air or modified atmosphere) and temperature (5 or 25 °C) on the population dynamics of a strain of E. coli O157:H7. For vegetables, the growth in two films, which created different O2 and CO2 concentrations, and air were compared. At 25 °C, growth of E. coli O157:H7 was higher in fresh-cut carrots than in endive, reaching populations between 7.0–8.4 log cfu g−1 and 5.2–6.3 log cfu g−1 after 3 days of storage, respectively. In fruits, E. coli O157:H7 grew well in fresh-cut melon regardless of the atmospheric conditions in the package, reaching populations of 8.5 and 8.9 log cfu g−1 after 1 day of storage in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) or under air conditions, respectively. No growth was observed in the fresh-cut pineapple. At 5 °C, E. coli O157:H7 did not grow but survived throughout the studied period in all tested commodities. This work emphasises the importance of strict temperature control from processing to consumption, including transportation, distribution, storage and handling in supermarkets and by consumers.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2012 · Food Control
  • Altisent R. · Graell J. · Lara I. · López M. L. · Echeverría G.
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Over two subsequent seasons, emission of volatile compounds, consumer acceptability and quality parameters were analyzed in“Fuji” apples. In both seasons, apples were harvested at the same maturity stage and stored for 19 or 30 weeks at 1C and 92% relative humidity under an ultralow oxygen (ULO) atmosphere (1% O2 + 1% CO2) or under an ULO atmosphere followed by different periods (2 or 4 weeks) in cold air. The results revealed, for both seasons, that 4 weeks of cold air storage after ULO storage helped to increase the emission of some volatile compounds for both storage period, including characteristic volatile compounds for the variety, and did not have a negative effect on quality parameters.Additionally, the consumer acceptability was superior for those fruits.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2012 · Journal of Food Quality
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: All efforts to improve fruit quality are rewarded when consumers are satisfied after tasting the fruit. Apples are often stored under controlled atmosphere conditions to preserve them over time, but this frequently results in a loss of flavor. The aim of this work, which was based on two seasons, was to evaluate the influence of a period of short-term air storage (periods of 2 and 4 weeks) after removal from ultralow oxygen (ULO) storage (1 kPa of O(2)/1 kPa of CO(2)) with respect to increases in volatile compound emissions and the effect on standard and sensory quality in 'Golden Reinders' apples. The results showed that emissions of 26 volatile compounds increased as a result of ULO + 2 weeks or ULO + 4 weeks of storage. However, the results of tastings involving a panel of consumers and trained experts revealed that this increase was not matched by corresponding increases in either the degree of consumer preference or flavor attributes.
    Full-text · Article · May 2011 · Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ‘Golden’ is the most cultivated apple group in Europe. In recent years, new mutants have emerged which improve both aspects of production and sensory attributes. In this work, emission of volatile compounds and the activity of lipoxygenase system–related enzymes in ‘Golden Reinders®’ apples were analysed after 19 and 30 weeks under ultra low oxygen atmosphere (ULO) or under ULO plus different periods in cold air atmosphere and after remaining 1 and 7 days at 20 °C. This study examined modifications in the capacity for volatile ester production, specifically focusing on modification in lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide lyase activity. Volatile compound emission reached a maximum after 30 weeks of cold storage plus 7 days at 20 °C. Straight-chain esters were closely related to lipoxygenase activity in the flesh tissue, leading, suggesting that lipoxygenase enzyme plays an important role in the emission of straight-chain esters: the most characteristic volatile type associated with this apple variety.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011 · European Food Research and Technology
  • Source
    Altisent R. · Graell J. · Lara I. · López M.L. · Echeverría G.
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to assess if an extra period of time in AIR after storage in Ultra Low Oxygen (ULO) atmosphere may be helpful for the regeneration of the emission of volatile compounds, and to evaluate the influence of this regeneration on consumer acceptability of ‘Golden Reinders’ apples. Fruit were stored for 19 or 30 weeks at 1°C and 92% RH under ULO (1 kPa O2 : 1 kPa CO2) or under ULO plus 2 or 4 weeks in AIR (ULO+2w or ULO+4w, respectively). Emission of volatile compounds and consumers’ acceptability were analysed after storage plus 7 d at 20°C. Data were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) in order to characterise fruit after storage. The biplot of PC1 vs. PC2 for this model showed that acceptability was correlated to specific aroma compounds, namely hexyl octanoate, ethyl acetate and ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, whose odour descriptors include “fruity” and “ripe apple”.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2010 · Acta horticulturae
  • Source
    R. Altisent · G. Echeverría · I. Lara · M. L. López · J. Graell
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to estimate shelf-life potential and understand quality characteristics of ‘Golden Reinders’ apples during ripening after storage under ultra low oxygen (ULO) atmosphere. Fruits, corresponding to two different maturity stages (147 and 155 dafb), were kept at 1 °C in ULO atmosphere (1 kPa O2: 1 kPa CO2) for seven months and subsequently kept at 1 °C in regular air for up to 28 days. Sub-batches were removed weekly and transferred to 20 °C, so that the shelf-life periods at room temperature were 28, 21, 14, 7, and 0 days. Fruit from both maturity stages showed firmness and soluble solids content (SSC) values above the minimum commercial requirements for this variety throughout the post-storage ripening period. However, only earlier harvested fruit maintained high levels of titratable acidity (TA). Production of aroma volatile compounds was low for shorter ripening periods, though it increased progressively as ripeness advanced. Principal component analysis showed the variables that positively influenced acceptability were: octyl acetate, hexyl octanoate, butyl propanoate, propyl pentanoate, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one as aroma volatile compounds; SSC, TA, firmness, and epidermis colour (Hue) as physicochemical parameters; and sourness and sensory firmness as sensory attributes. From a general overview, the optimum shelf-life period for ‘Golden Reinders’ apples would be between 7 and 14 days for both maturity stages.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2009 · Food Science and Technology International
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An extra period under cold air after ultra-low oxygen storage has been shown to increase the concentration of some volatile compounds emitted by stored 'Fuji' apples. The purpose of this work was to assess the role, if any, of lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide lyase activities in the regeneration of fruit capacity for volatile production after ultra-low oxygen storage. Fruits were stored at 1 °C and 92% relative humidity under ultra-low oxygen (1 kPa of O2/1 kPa of CO2); one lot was kept under hypoxia for 19 or 30 weeks, a second lot was maintained for 17 or 28 weeks under these conditions and then stored for 2 weeks in cold air, and a third lot remained for either 15 or 26 weeks under ultra-low oxygen followed by 4 weeks under cold air. Samples were placed subsequently at 20 °C, and analyses of volatile emission and enzyme activities were undertaken 1 and 7 days thereafter. Fruit stored during 4 weeks in cold air after ultra-low oxygen storage showed the highest capacity for volatile regeneration. Higher emission of volatiles by these samples was concomitant with higher levels of lipoxygenase activity. Results suggest that lipoxygenase activity, particularly in the flesh tissue, was strongly related to the regeneration of the emission of volatile compounds allowed by the extra period in cold air after ultra-low oxygen storage and, thus, appears to be a key control point for successful recovery of fruit ability for volatile compound production.
    Full-text · Article · May 2009 · Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to assess whether extra time spent under AIR conditions after storage in an ultra low oxygen (ULO) atmosphere could allow the regeneration of volatile compound emission without negatively affecting quality parameters and the consumer acceptability of Fuji apples. Fruits were stored for 19 and 30 weeks at 1 degrees C and 92% RH under ULO atmosphere conditions (1 kPa O 2:1 kPa CO 2) or under ULO conditions followed by different periods (2 and 4 weeks) in cold AIR atmosphere (ULO + 2w or ULO + 4w, respectively). Standard quality and emission of volatile compounds were analyzed after storage plus 1 and 7 days at 20 degrees C. Sensory attributes and acceptability were also determined after 7 days at 20 degrees C. The extra period of 30 weeks in an AIR atmosphere after ULO storage resulted in an increase in the concentration of the compounds that most contribute to the flavor of Fuji apples. These fruits were relatively well accepted by consumers despite a slight decline in firmness and acidity.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2008 · Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The production of aroma volatile compounds and standard quality attributes, in addition to lipoxygenase (LOX), hydroperoxide lyase (HPL), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and alcohol o-acyltransferase (AAT) activities, were assessed during maturation of ‘Pink Lady®’ apples. Low production of aroma volatiles was observed in early harvested fruit, which gradually increased as ripeness approached. Hexyl acetate, hexyl 2-methylbutanoate, hexyl hexanoate, hexyl butanoate, 2-methylbutyl acetate and butyl acetate were prominent within the blend of volatiles produced by fruit throughout maturation. Multivariate analysis showed these compounds had the highest influence on differentiation of maturity stages, indicating that aroma volatile emission is an important factor for definition of fruit ripeness, which suggests production of these esters might be useful as an index of maturity. No large variations in AAT activity were found throughout the experimental period despite increasing ester emission, suggesting the enhancement of ester production by ‘Pink Lady®’ apples at ripening arises mainly from greater availability of substrates. Increased LOX activity was observed at later stages of fruit development, and the possible role of this enzyme activity on enhanced capacity for aroma volatile biosynthesis in more mature fruit is discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2008 · Postharvest Biology and Technology