Mark E Ginsburg

Columbia University, New York, New York, United States

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Publications (64)241.99 Total impact


  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
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    ABSTRACT: Portable chest radiography is a fundamental and frequently utilized examination in the critically ill patient population. The chest radiograph often represents a timely investigation of new or rapidly evolving clinical findings and an evaluation of proper positioning of support tubes and catheters. Thoughtful consideration of the use of this simple yet valuable resource is crucial as medical cost containment becomes even more mandatory. This review addresses the role of chest radiography in the intensive care unit on the basis of the existing literature and as formed by a consensus of an expert panel on thoracic imaging through the American College of Radiology. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of thoracic imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) validated the efficacy of lung-volume reduction surgery (LVRS) in selected patients with emphysema; however, concerns about the safety and durability of the operation have limited its clinical application. We evaluated our experience with LVRS, for the time period since approval was given by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, with respect to surgical morbidity and mortality, early and late functional outcomes, and long-term survival. Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed on 91 patients for whom consent was obtained for bilateral LVRS at our institution between January 2004 and June 2014. Primary outcomes analyzed were 6-month surgical mortality and overall survival at 1, 2, and 5 years. Secondary outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], residual volume, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, a 6-minute walk test, exercise capacity, and a shortness-of-breath questionnaire) were analyzed for mean change from baseline at 1, 2, and 5 years after LVRS. Results: The 6-month surgical mortality rate was 0%. At the 1- and 5-year follow-up, 69% and 36% of the patients had an improvement in FEV1. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year FEV1 change in % predicted of the FEV1, compared with baseline after LVRS, respectively, was 11.1% (95% CI: 8.6%, 13.6%); 8.7% (95% CI: 6.1%, 11.4%); and 11.1% (95% CI: 7.1%, 15.0%); and the maximal workload (in watts [W]) had an average increase of: 10.7 W (95% CI: 6.9, 14.6); 7.6 W (95% CI: 2.8, 12.4); and 10.24 W (95% CI: 4.4, 16.1). Overall survival (95% CI) for the group was: 0.99 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.00) at 1 year; 0.97 (95% CI: 0.93, 1.00) at 2 years; and 0.78 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.89) at 5 years. Conclusions: Given proper patient selection, LVRS is a safe operation. Early functional measurements are consistent with significant clinical benefit. Long-term results demonstrate that improvements can be durable. Surgical LVRS continues to represent the standard for lung-volume reduction therapy.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · European Respiratory Journal
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    Preview · Article · Aug 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Extracorporeal life support technology has gained acceptance as a salvage mode for patients in respiratory or cardiac failure. Patients who are sick enough to require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support are often too unstable for transfer to a hospital with ECMO capabilities. We highlight the progressive development of an ECMO transport team and the manner in which it provides reliable transport with excellent outcomes. All data were collected retrospectively from our hospital's electronic medical record. Patient outcomes are reported through April 2, 2014. Our institution began an ECMO transport program in 2008, with the initial phase involving transport of highly selected patients for short distances. With experience we refined our intake and evaluation process. We also consolidated care for ECMO patients into two intensive care units and developed a dedicated ECMO intensivist position. As the program has matured, patient selection has become more inclusive and we have extended our capabilities to include interstate and international transport. All 100 patients were successfully placed on ECMO and transported to our center. Seventy-nine patients were placed on venovenous ECMO, 19 on venoarterial ECMO, and 2 on venovenous arterial ECMO. The median transport distance was 16 miles and ranged from 2.5 to 7,084 miles. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation transport can be performed safely and reliably with excellent outcomes with a dedicated team that maintains stringent adherence to well-designed management protocols. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The integration of chemotherapy, radiation therapy (RT), and surgery in the management of patients with stage IIIA (N2) non-small-cell lung carcinoma is challenging. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria Lung Cancer Panel was charged to update management recommendations for this clinical scenario. The Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. There is limited level I evidence to guide patient selection for induction, postoperative RT (PORT), or definitive RT. Literature interpretation is complicated by inconsistent diagnostic procedures for N2 disease, disease heterogeneity, and pooled analysis with other stages. PORT is an appropriate therapy following adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with incidental pN2 disease. In patients with clinical N2 disease who are potential candidates for a lobectomy, both definitive and induction concurrent chemotherapy/RT are appropriate treatments. In N2 patients who require a pneumonectomy, definitive concurrent chemotherapy/RT is most appropriate although induction concurrent chemotherapy/RT may be considered in expert hands. Induction chemotherapy followed by surgery +/- PORT may also be an option in N2 patients. For preoperative RT and PORT, 3-dimensional conformal techniques and intensity-modulated RT are most appropriate.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · American journal of clinical oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Thoracic outlet syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by compression of the neurovascular bundle, and may be associated with additional findings such as venous thrombosis, arterial stenosis, or neurologic symptoms. The goal of imaging is to localize the site of compression, the compressing structure, and the compressed organ or vessel, while excluding common mimics. A literature review is provided of current indications for diagnostic imaging, with discussion of potential limitations and benefits of the respective modalities. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. In this document, we provided guidelines for use of various imaging modalities for assessment of thoracic outlet syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
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    ABSTRACT: Rib fracture is the most common thoracic injury, present in 10% of all traumatic injuries and almost 40% of patients who sustain severe nonpenetrating trauma. Although rib fractures can produce significant morbidity, the diagnosis of associated complications (such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, atelectasis, flail chest, cardiovascular injury, and injuries to solid and hollow abdominal organs) may have a more significant clinical impact. When isolated, rib fractures have a relatively low morbidity and mortality, and failure to detect isolated rib fractures does not necessarily alter patient management or outcome in uncomplicated cases. A standard posteroanterior chest radiograph should be the initial, and often the only, imaging test required in patients with suspected rib fracture after minor trauma. Detailed radiographs of the ribs rarely add additional information that would change treatment, and, although other imaging tests (eg, computed tomography, bone scan) have increased sensitivity for detection of rib fractures, there are little data to support their use. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review process include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of Thoracic Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Concurrent chemotherapy/radiotherapy has been considered the standard treatment for patients with a good performance status and inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Three-dimensional chemoradiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have been reported to reduce toxicity and allow a dose escalation to 70 Gy and beyond. However, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0617 trial recently showed that dose escalation from 60 Gy to 74 Gy with concurrent chemotherapy in stage III NSCLC was associated with higher toxicity and worse survival. A "one size fits all" treatment approach may need to be changed and adapted to each patient's particular disease and unique biologic/anatomic features, as well as the most appropriate radiotherapy modalities for that patient. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application, by the panel, of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi technique) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures. In instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used as the basis for recommending imaging or treatment.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
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    ABSTRACT: Although hemoptysis is often self-limited and benign in origin, it can be an indicator of serious disease including bronchiectasis, granulomatous infection, and malignancy. Hemoptysis severity can be graded on the basis of the quantity of expectorated blood: <30 mL of hemoptysis as minor, 30 to 300 mL as moderate to severe (major), and >300 to 400 mL in 24 hours as massive. Among patients with hemoptysis, chest radiographs are often abnormal and can guide evaluation. The overall risk for malignancy in patients with normal radiographs is low but may be as much as 5% to 10% in patients with >30 mL of hemoptysis and those who are above 40 years of age and have significant smoking history. A combination of negative computed tomography and bronchoscopy results predicts a very low likelihood of lung malignancy diagnosis over medium-term follow-up (2 to 3 y). Bronchial and nonbronchial systemic arteries are much more frequent sources of hemoptysis than pulmonary arteries. Major or massive hemoptysis can usually be stopped acutely by bronchial arterial embolization. Recurrences, however, are common and often require repeat embolization. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of thoracic imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is diagnosed in about 15% to 20% of lung cancer patients at presentation. In order to provide clinicians with guidance in decision making for early-stage NSCLC patients, the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria Lung Cancer Panel was recently charged with a review of the current published literature to generate up-to-date management recommendations for this clinical scenario. For patients with localized, mediastinal lymph node-negative NSCLC, optimal management should be determined by an expert multidisciplinary team. For medically operable patients, surgical resection is the standard of care, with generally no role for adjuvant therapies thereafter. For patients with medical comorbidities making them at high risk for surgery, there is emerging evidence demonstrating the availability of low toxicity curative therapies, such as stereotactic body radiotherapy, for their care. As a general statement, the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · American journal of clinical oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Journal of the American College of Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: Dyspnea, described as breathlessness or shortness of breath, is usually caused by cardiopulmonary disease. The role of imaging in chronic dyspnea (>1 mo in duration) with suspected pulmonary origin is reviewed as suggested by the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria® Expert Panel on Thoracic Imaging. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria® are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Journal of Thoracic Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Dyspnea, described as breathlessness or shortness of breath, is usually caused by cardiopulmonary disease. The role of imaging in chronic dyspnea (>1 mo in duration) with suspected pulmonary origin is reviewed as suggested by the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria Expert Panel on Thoracic Imaging. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Journal of Thoracic Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Radiation therapy plays a potential curative role in the treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer with locoregional disease who are not surgical candidates and a palliative role for patients with metastatic disease. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a relatively new technique in patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. A trial from RTOG(R) reported >97% local control at 3 years. For patients with locally advanced disease, thoracic radiation to a dose of 60 Gy remains the standard of care. Sequential chemotherapy or radiation alone can be used for patients with poor performance status who cannot tolerate more aggressive approaches. Chemotherapy should be used for patients with metastatic disease. Radiation therapy is useful for palliation of symptomatic tumors, and a dose of approximately 30 Gy is commonly used. Endobronchial brachytherapy is useful for patients with symptomatic endobronchial tumors. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Journal of the American College of Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of obtaining adequate cytologic specimens by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for molecular testing of lung adenocarcinomas. This was an institutional review board-approved study of all patients who had undergone EBUS-TBNA from April 2010 through March 2012 for the diagnosis, staging, or both of lung cancer. Patients with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma were reflexively tested for molecular markers by polymerase chain reaction, sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). All procedures were performed with patients under conscious sedation in the bronchoscopy suite. Of 205 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA, 56 patients (24 male, 32 female) had a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma warranting molecular analysis. Molecular analysis was available for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Kirsten rat sarcoma (Kras) mutation, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement. The institution's clinical protocol involved initial testing for EGFR mutation with a reflex Kras test if the EGFR test result was negative. ALK FISH molecular testing was completed if both EGFR and Kras test results were negative. A total of 52 of 56 (93%) patients had sufficient cytologic material for complete or partial molecular testing, whereas 46 of 56 (82%) patients had sufficient material for all clinically indicated testing. EGFR, Kras, and ALK analysis yielded positive results in 5 (10%), 10 (25%), and 5 (12%) tested specimens, respectively. No complications were associated with EBUS-TBNA. EBUS-TBNA performed with the patient under moderate sedation can be expected to yield sufficient tissue for sequential molecular analysis in the majority of patients. In an era of targeted therapy for lung adenocarcinomas, EBUS-TBNA is effective in clinical practice for complete diagnosis, staging, and treatment planning in these patients.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may be idiopathic or related to a variety of diseases. The diagnosis, accurate assessment of etiology and severity, prognosis, treatment response, and follow-up of PH can be achieved using a diverse set of diagnostic examinations. In this review, the role of imaging in the evaluation of PH as suggested by the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria Expert Panel on Thoracic Imaging has been discussed. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The development and review of the guidelines include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Journal of Thoracic Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may be idiopathic or related to a variety of diseases. The diagnosis, accurate assessment of etiology and severity, prognosis, treatment response, and follow-up of PH can be achieved using a diverse set of diagnostic examinations. In this review, the role of imaging in the evaluation of PH as suggested by the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria s Expert Panel on Thoracic Imaging has been discussed. The American College of Radiology Appropriate-ness Criteria s are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The development and review of the guidelines include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established con-sensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.
    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2013

Publication Stats

924 Citations
241.99 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1994-2015
    • Columbia University
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • College of Physicians and Surgeons
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2014
    • The Society of Thoracic Surgeons
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1997-2008
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1994-2003
    • New York Presbyterian Hospital
      • Department of Cardiology
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1998
    • Mid-Columbia Medical Center
      DLS, Oregon, United States