Jon-Fredrik Nielsen

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

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Publications (20)59.78 Total impact

  • Hao Sun · Jeffrey A Fessler · Douglas C Noll · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Develop a method for rapid three-dimensional inner-volume (IV), or reduced field-of-view, steady-state imaging. Methods: Tailored radiofrequency pulses for exciting a three-dimensional IV were designed using a recently proposed algorithm and used in three different sequences: spoiled gradient echo, balanced steady-state free precession, and "small-tip fast recovery" (STFR) which uses a "tip-up" RF pulse after the readout to fast recover spins to the longitudinal axis. The inner- and outer-volume (OV) steady-state signals were analyzed. To demonstrate the potential utility of the proposed method, segmented stack-of-spirals reduced field-of-view images in a volunteer were acquired. Results: For a given three-dimensional IV excitation pulse, STFR can achieve higher IV/OV signal ratio compared with spoiled gradient echo and balanced steady-state free precession. For spoiled gradient echo and balanced steady-state free precession, this ratio is significantly lower than that produced by a single IV excitation. For STFR, this ratio exceeds that produced by a single IV excitation, due to partial OV saturation produced by the nonspatially selective tip-up pulse. Reduced FOV STFR stack-of-spirals imaging with 2-fold under-sampling in both x-y and z is demonstrated. Conclusion: STFR provides an effective mechanism for OV suppression in steady-state IV imaging. The recently proposed joint pulse design method can be used in the STFR sequence to achieve fast reduced field-of-view imaging. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phase contrast imaging has undergone a wide range of changes with the development and availability of improved calibration procedures, visualization tools, and analysis methods. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current state-of-the-art in CMR phase contrast imaging methodology, clinical applications including summaries of past clinical performance, and emerging research and clinical applications that utilize today’s latest technology. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12968-015-0172-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
  • Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Douglas C Noll
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    ABSTRACT: Radiofrequency-spoiled steady-state sequences offer rapid data acquisition with T1- or T2*-weighting. The spoiler gradients in these sequences must be large enough to suppress ghost artifacts, and are chosen empirically. However, certain factors such as the need to minimize gradient first moments or acoustic noise can limit the spoiler size and, hence, the ability to suppress ghosts. We present an acquisition and preprocessing strategy for improved spoiling efficiency in conventional and echo-shifted dynamic radiofrequency-spoiled 3D imaging. By requiring each time-frame in a dynamic imaging sequence to contain a particular (restricted) number of total radiofrequency shots, the ghost signal can be made to alternate in sign every other frame. The ghost is then suppressed by Fourier transforming along the temporal dimension, and removing the Nyquist frequency in preprocessing (similar to UNFOLD). The method works for both Cartesian and non-Cartesian imaging. We demonstrate improved ghost suppression with the proposed approach, for both conventional and echo-shifted spoiled gradient echo imaging in stationary phantoms and in vivo. Cartesian echo-shifted spoiled gradient echo imaging produces two ghosts shifted in opposite directions, both of which are suppressed with our method. For a given spoiler gradient area, the proposed approach substantially suppresses the ghost signal in both conventional and echo-shifted dynamic radiofrequency-spoiled imaging. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
  • Hao Sun · Jeffrey A Fessler · Douglas C Noll · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen
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    ABSTRACT: Small-tip fast recovery (STFR) imaging has been proposed recently as a potential alternative to balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP). STFR relies on a tailored "tip-up" radio-frequency pulse to achieve comparable signal level as bSSFP, but with reduced banding artifacts and transient oscillations, and is compatible with magnetization-preparation pulses. Previous STFR implementations used two-dimensional or three-dimensional pulses spatially tailored to the accumulated phase calculated from a B0 field map, making the steady-state STFR signal contain some T2* weighting. Here, we propose to replace the spatially tailored pulse with a recently introduced spectrally selective "pre-winding" pulse that is precomputed to a target frequency range. The proposed "spectral-STFR" sequence produces T2/T1-weighted images similar to bSSFP, but with reduced banding and potentially other benefits. We investigated the steady-state signal properties of spectral-STFR using simulations, and phantom and human volunteer experiments. Our simulation and experimental results showed that the spectral-STFR sequence has similar signal level and tissue contrast as bSSFP, but has a wider passband and more consistent banding profiles across different tissues (e.g., less hyperintense signal at band edges for low flip angles). Care is needed in designing the spectral radio-frequency pulse to ensure that the small tip angle approximation holds during radio-frequency transmission. Spectral-STFR has similar tissue contrast as bSSFP but a wider passband and more consistent cerebrospinal fluid/brain tissue contrast across the passband. The spectral-STFR sequence is a potential alternative to bSSFP in some applications. Compared to a spatially tailored STFR sequence, spectral-STFR can be precomputed, is easier to implement in practice, and potentially has more uniform image contrast and minimal T2* weighting. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
  • Feng Zhao · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Douglas C Noll
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    ABSTRACT: The conventional spectrally selective fat saturation pulse may perform poorly with inhomogeneous amplitude of static (polarizing) field (B0 ) and/or amplitude of (excitation) radiofrequency field (B1 ) fields. We propose a four dimensional spectral-spatial fat saturation pulse that is more robust to B0/B1 inhomogeneity and also shorter than the conventional fat saturation pulse. The proposed pulse is tailored for local B0 inhomogeneity, which avoids the need of a sharp transition band in the spectral domain, so it improves both performance and pulse length. Furthermore, it can also compensate for B1 inhomogeneity. The pulse is designed sequentially by small-tip-angle approximation design and an automatic rescaling procedure. The proposed method is compared to the conventional fat saturation in phantom experiments and in vivo knee imaging at 3 T for both single-channel and parallel excitation versions. Compared to the conventional method, the proposed method produces superior fat suppression in the presence of B0 and B1 inhomogeneity and reduces pulse length by up to half of the standard length. The proposed four dimensional spectral-spatial fat saturation suppresses fat more robustly with shorter pulse length than the conventional fat saturation in the presence of B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Parallel transmit is an emerging technology to address the technical challenges associated with MR imaging at high field strengths. When developing arrays for parallel transmit systems, one of the primary factors to be considered is the mechanism to manage coupling and create independently operating channels. Recent work has demonstrated the use of amplifiers to provide some or all of the channel-to-channel isolation, reducing the need for on-coil decoupling networks in a manner analogous to the use of isolation preamplifiers with receive coils. This paper discusses an eight-channel transmit/receive head array for use with an ultra-low output impedance (ULOI) parallel transmit system. The ULOI amplifiers eliminated the need for a complex lumped element network to decouple the eight-rung array. The design and construction details of the array are discussed in addition to the measurement considerations required for appropriately characterizing an array when using ULOI amplifiers. B1 maps and coupling matrices are used to verify the performance of the system.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · Journal of Magnetic Resonance
  • Hao Sun · Jeffrey A Fessler · Douglas C Noll · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen
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    ABSTRACT: Small-tip fast recovery (STFR) imaging is a recently proposed steady-state sequence that has similar image contrast as balanced steady-state free precession but has the potential to simultaneously remove banding artifacts and transient fluctuation. STFR relies on a "tip-up" radiofrequency (RF) pulse tailored to the accumulated phase during the free precession (data acquisition) interval, designed to bring spins back to the longitudinal axis, thereby preserving transverse magnetization as longitudinal magnetization for the next pulse repetition time. We recently proposed an RF-spoiled STFR sequence suitable for thin slab imaging, however, in many applications, e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging or isotropic-resolution structural imaging, three-dimensional (3D) steady-state imaging is desirable. Unfortunately, 3D STFR imaging is challenging due to the need for 3D tailored RF pulses. Here, we propose new strategies for improved 3D STFR imaging, based on (i) unspoiled imaging, and (ii) joint design of nonslice-selective tip-down/tip-up RF pulses. We derive an analytic signal model for the proposed unspoiled STFR sequence, and propose two strategies for designing the 3D tailored tip-down/tip-up RF pulses. We validate the analytic results using phantom and in vivo imaging experiments. Our analytic model and imaging experiments demonstrate that the proposed unspoiled STFR sequence is less sensitive to tip-up excitation error compared to the corresponding spoiled sequence, and may, therefore, be an attractive candidate for 3D imaging. The proposed "joint" RF pulse design method, in which we formulate the tip-down/tip-up RF pulse design task as a magnitude least squares problem, produces modest improvement over a simpler "Separate" design approach. Using the proposed unspoiled sequence and joint RF pulse design, we demonstrate proof-of-principle 3D STFR brain images with balanced steady-state free precession-like signal properties but with reduced banding. Using the proposed unspoiled sequence and joint RF pulse design, STFR brain images in a 3D region of interest with balanced steady-state free precession-like signal properties but with reduced banding can be obtained. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
  • Daniel S Weller · Sathish Ramani · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Jeffrey A Fessler
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    ABSTRACT: Regularizing parallel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction significantly improves image quality but requires tuning parameter selection. We propose a Monte Carlo method for automatic parameter selection based on Stein's unbiased risk estimate that minimizes the multichannel k-space mean squared error (MSE). We automatically tune parameters for image reconstruction methods that preserve the undersampled acquired data, which cannot be accomplished using existing techniques. We derive a weighted MSE criterion appropriate for data-preserving regularized parallel imaging reconstruction and the corresponding weighted Stein's unbiased risk estimate. We describe a Monte Carlo approximation of the weighted Stein's unbiased risk estimate that uses two evaluations of the reconstruction method per candidate parameter value. We reconstruct images using the denoising sparse images from GRAPPA using the nullspace method (DESIGN) and L1 iterative self-consistent parallel imaging (L1 -SPIRiT). We validate Monte Carlo Stein's unbiased risk estimate against the weighted MSE. We select the regularization parameter using these methods for various noise levels and undersampling factors and compare the results to those using MSE-optimal parameters. Our method selects nearly MSE-optimal regularization parameters for both DESIGN and L1 -SPIRiT over a range of noise levels and undersampling factors. The proposed method automatically provides nearly MSE-optimal choices of regularization parameters for data-preserving nonlinear parallel MRI reconstruction methods. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
  • Hao Sun · Jeffrey A. Fessler · Douglas C. Noll · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen

    No preview · Conference Paper · Apr 2013
  • Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Daehyun Yoon · Douglas C Noll
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    ABSTRACT: Small-tip fast recovery (STFR) imaging is a new steady-state imaging sequence that is a potential alternative to balanced steady-state free precession. Under ideal imaging conditions, STFR may provide comparable signal-to-noise ratio and image contrast as balanced steady-state free precession, but without signal variations due to resonance offset. STFR relies on a tailored "tip-up," or "fast recovery," radiofrequency pulse to align the spins with the longitudinal axis after each data readout segment. The design of the tip-up pulse is based on the acquisition of a separate off-resonance (B0) map. Unfortunately, the design of fast (a few ms) slice- or slab-selective radiofrequency pulses that accurately tailor the excitation pattern to the local B0 inhomogeneity over the entire imaging volume remains a challenging and unsolved problem. We introduce a novel implementation of STFR imaging based on "non-slice-selective" tip-up pulses, which simplifies the radiofrequency pulse design problem significantly. Out-of-slice magnetization pathways are suppressed using radiofrequency-spoiling. Brain images obtained with this technique show excellent gray/white matter contrast, and point to the possibility of rapid steady-state T(2) /T(1) -weighted imaging with intrinsic suppression of cerebrospinal fluid, through-plane vessel signal, and off-resonance artifacts. In the future, we expect STFR imaging to benefit significantly from parallel excitation hardware and high-order gradient shim systems. Magn Reson Med, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
  • Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Luis Hernandez-Garcia
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    ABSTRACT: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) provides quantitative and reproducible measurements of regional cerebral blood flow, and is therefore an attractive method for functional MRI. However, most existing ASL functional MRI protocols are based on either two-dimensional (2D) multislice or 3D spin-echo and suffer from very low image signal-to-noise ratio or through-plane blurring. 3D ASL with multishot (segmented) readouts can improve the signal-to-noise ratio efficiency relative to 2D multislice and does not suffer from T(2) -blurring. However, segmented readouts require lower imaging flip-angles and may increase the susceptibility to temporal signal fluctuations (e.g., due to physiology) relative to 2D multislice. In this article, we characterize the temporal signal-to-noise ratio of a segmented 3D spiral ASL sequence, and investigate the effects of radiofrequency phase cycling scheme and flip-angle schedule on image properties. We show that radiofrequency-spoiling is essential in segmented 3D spiral ASL, and that 3D ASL can improve temporal signal-to-noise ratio 2-fold relative to 2D multislice when using a simple polynomial (cubic) flip-angle schedule. Functional MRI results using the proposed optimized segmented 3D spiral ASL protocol show excellent activation in the visual cortex. Magn Reson Med, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
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    Feng Zhao · Douglas C Noll · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Jeffrey A Fessler
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    ABSTRACT: Compressed sensing (CS) has been used for accelerating magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions, but its use in applications with rapid spatial phase variations is challenging, e.g., proton resonance frequency shift (PRF-shift) thermometry and velocity mapping. Previously, an iterative MRI reconstruction with separate magnitude and phase regularization was proposed for applications where magnitude and phase maps are both of interest, but it requires fully sampled data and unwrapped phase maps. In this paper, CS is combined into this framework to reconstruct magnitude and phase images accurately from undersampled data. Moreover, new phase regularization terms are proposed to accommodate phase wrapping and to reconstruct images with encoded phase variations, e.g., PRF-shift thermometry and velocity mapping. The proposed method is demonstrated with simulated thermometry data and in vivo velocity mapping data and compared to conventional phase corrected CS.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2012
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    Sathish Ramani · Zhihao Liu · Jeffrey Rosen · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Jeffrey A. Fessler
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    ABSTRACT: Regularized iterative reconstruction algorithms for imaging inverse problems require selection of appropriate regularization parameter values. We focus on the challenging problem of tuning regularization parameters for nonlinear algorithms for the case of additive (possibly complex) Gaussian noise. Generalized cross-validation (GCV) and (weighted) mean-squared error (MSE) approaches (based on Steinfs Unbiased Risk Estimate. SURE) need the Jacobian matrix of the nonlinear reconstruction operator (representative of the iterative algorithm) with respect to the data. We derive the desired Jacobian matrix for two types of nonlinear iterative algorithms: a fast variant of the standard iterative reweighted least-squares method and the contemporary split-Bregman algorithm, both of which can accommodate a wide variety of analysis- and synthesis-type regularizers. The proposed approach iteratively computes two weighted SURE-type measures: Predicted-SURE and Projected-SURE (that require knowledge of noise variance Ð2), and GCV (that does not need Ð2) for these algorithms. We apply the methods to image restoration and to magnetic resonance image (MRI) reconstruction using total variation (TV) and an analysis-type .1-regularization. We demonstrate through simulations and experiments with real data that minimizing Predicted-SURE and Projected-SURE consistently lead to near-MSE-optimal reconstructions. We also observed that minimizing GCV yields reconstruction results that are near-MSE-optimal for image restoration and slightly suboptimal for MRI. Theoretical derivations in this work related to Jacobian matrix evaluations can be extended, in principle, to other types of regularizers and reconstruction algorithms.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2012 · IEEE Transactions on Image Processing
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    ABSTRACT: Parallel transmit technology in the clinical setting has yet to receive widespread adoption. To retrofit existing clinical systems for multi-channel transmit, dedicated hardware and a flexible, user-friendly software interface must be developed. We have designed a LabVIEW-based software system to drive an 8-channel parallel transmit system and provide a straightforward interface for the pulse designer. The software system plays out the RF envelopes, controls hardware settings and calibrations, performs some power sequencing, monitors the RF waveforms, and pre-distorts the RF envelopes for linearization, placing the system operational burden on the software system, rather than the user. The system supports transmit-SENSE applications, allowing for amplitude and phase control on each channel. The software system facilitates a quick switchover between the existing 3T GE clinical system and the parallel transmit system.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2011
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    Joao L A Carvalho · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Krishna S Nayak
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    ABSTRACT: Arterial wall shear stress is widely believed to influence the formation and growth of atherosclerotic plaque; however, there is currently no gold standard for its in vivo measurement. The use of phase contrast MRI has proved to be challenging due to partial-volume effects and inadequate signal-to-noise ratio at the high spatial resolutions that are required. This work evaluates the use of spiral Fourier velocity encoded MRI as a rapid method for assessing wall shear rate in the carotid arteries. Wall shear rate is calculated from velocity histograms in voxels spanning the blood/vessel wall interface, using a method developed by Frayne and Rutt (Magn Reson Med 1995;34:378-387). This study (i) demonstrates the accuracy of the velocity histograms measured by spiral Fourier velocity encoding in a pulsatile carotid flow phantom compared with high-resolution two-dimensional Fourier transform phase contrast, (ii) demonstrates the accuracy of Fourier velocity encoding-based shear rate measurements in a numerical phantom designed using a computational fluid dynamics simulation of carotid flow, and (iii) demonstrates in vivo measurement of regional wall shear rate and oscillatory shear index in the carotid arteries of healthy volunteers at 3 T.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2010 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
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    Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Krishna S Nayak
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    ABSTRACT: Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) is an established technique for measuring blood flow velocities in vivo. Although spoiled gradient recalled echo (GRE) PC-MRI is the most widely used pulse sequence today, balanced steady state free precession (SSFP) PC-MRI has been shown to produce accurate velocity estimates with superior SNR efficiency. We propose a referenceless approach to flow imaging that exploits the intrinsic refocusing property of balanced SSFP, and achieves up to a 50% reduction in total scan time. With the echo time set to exactly one half of the sequence repetition time (TE = TR/2), we show that non-flow-related image phase tends to vary smoothly across the field-of-view, and can be estimated from static tissue regions to produce a phase reference for nearby voxels containing flowing blood. This approach produces accurate in vivo one-dimensional velocity estimates in half the scan time compared with conventional balanced SSFP phase-contrast methods. We also demonstrate the feasibility of referenceless time-resolved 3D flow imaging (called "7D" flow) in the carotid bifurcation from just three acquisitions.
    Full-text · Article · May 2009 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
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    Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Krishna S Nayak
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze steady-state signal distortions in interleaved balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) caused by slightly unbalanced eddy-current fields and develop a general strategy for mitigating these artifacts. We considered bSSFP sequences in which two gradient waveforms are interleaved in a "groupwise" fashion, ie, each waveform is executed consecutively two or more times before switching to the other waveform (we let "N" count the number of times each waveform is executed consecutively). The steady-state signal profile over the bSSFP passband was calculated using numerical Bloch simulations and measured experimentally in a uniform phantom. The proposed "grouped" interleaved bSSFP strategy was applied to cardiac velocity mapping using interleaved phase-contrast imaging with N=2 and N=6 in one healthy volunteer. Simulation and phantom measurements show that signal distortions are systematically reduced with increasing grouping number N. For most tissues, significant suppression was achieved with N=4, and increasing N beyond this value produced only marginal gains. However, signal distortions for blood remain relatively high even for N>4. In vivo cardiac velocity mapping using interleaved phase-contrast imaging with N=6 demonstrated reduced image artifact levels compared to the N=2 acquisition. Gradient waveform "grouping" offers a simple and general strategy for mitigating steady-state eddy-current distortions in bSSFP sequences that interleave two different gradients. Blood exhibits significant distortion even with "grouping," which is a major obstacle for cardiovascular bSSFP approaches that interleave multiple gradient waveforms. The grouping concept may also benefit applications that acquire images during the transient approach to steady state.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2009 · Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
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    Yoon-Chul Kim · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Krishna S Nayak
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    ABSTRACT: To develop a method that automatically corrects ghosting artifacts due to echo-misalignment in interleaved gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) in arbitrary oblique or double-oblique scan planes. An automatic ghosting correction technique was developed based on an alternating EPI acquisition and the phased-array ghost elimination (PAGE) reconstruction method. The direction of k-space traversal is alternated at every temporal frame, enabling lower temporal-resolution ghost-free coil sensitivity maps to be dynamically estimated. The proposed method was compared with conventional one-dimensional (1D) phase correction in axial, oblique, and double-oblique scan planes in phantom and cardiac in vivo studies. The proposed method was also used in conjunction with two-fold acceleration. The proposed method with nonaccelerated acquisition provided excellent suppression of ghosting artifacts in all scan planes, and was substantially more effective than conventional 1D phase correction in oblique and double-oblique scan planes. The feasibility of real-time reconstruction using the proposed technique was demonstrated in a scan protocol with 3.1-mm spatial and 60-msec temporal resolution. The proposed technique with nonaccelerated acquisition provides excellent ghost suppression in arbitrary scan orientations without a calibration scan, and can be useful for real-time interactive imaging, in which scan planes are frequently changed with arbitrary oblique orientations.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2008 · Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
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    Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Krishna S Nayak
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    ABSTRACT: A technique for rapid in-plane phase-contrast imaging with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is described. Velocity-encoding is achieved by oscillating the readout gradient, such that each 2DFT phase-encode is acquired three times following a single RF slice-selective excitation. Three images are reconstructed, from which both flow velocity and local resonance offset are calculated. This technique is compatible with both gradient-recalled echo (GRE) and balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging using a single steady-state. The proposed technique enables 1D velocity mapping with 40% higher temporal resolution and 80% higher SNR, compared to conventional PC-MRI using bipolar velocity-encoding gradient pulses.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2007 · Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
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    Taehoon Shin · Jon-Fredrik Nielsen · Krishna S Nayak
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    ABSTRACT: The temporal resolution of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be increased by sampling a fraction of k-space in an interleaved fashion, which introduces spatial and temporal aliasing. We describe algebraically and graphically the aliasing process caused by dynamic undersampled spiral imaging within 3-D xyf space (the Fourier transform of k(x)k(y)t space) and formulate the unaliasing problem as a set of independent linear inversions. Since each linear system is numerically underdetermined, the use of prior knowledge in the form of bounded support regions is proposed. To overcome the excessive memory requirements for handling large matrices, a fast implementation of the conjugate gradient (CG) method is used. Numerical simulation and in vivo experiments using spiral twofold undersampling demonstrate reduced motion artifacts and the improved depiction of fine cardiac structures. The achieved reduction of motion artifacts and motion blur is comparable to simple filtering, which is computationally more efficient, while the proposed algebraic framework offers greater flexibility to incorporate additional algebraic acceleration techniques and to handle arbitrary sampling schemes.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2007 · IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging

Publication Stats

148 Citations
59.78 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011-2014
    • University of Michigan
      • • Department of Biomedical Engineering
      • • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • 2007-2010
    • University of Southern California
      • Department of Electrical Engineering
      Los Angeles, California, United States