HyeYoung Cho

Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (5)19.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The net balance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) system has been known to be a key factor in tumor cell invasion. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of anti-invasive and antimigrative activity of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 on HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. In in vitro Matrigel invasion and Transwell migration assays, TGF-beta1 dose-dependently inhibited the invasion and migration of HT1080 cells, respectively. Gelatin zymography, Western blot, and real-time PCR analysis showed that TGF-beta1 enhanced the expression and secretion of MMP-2, TIMP-1, and, to a lesser degree, MMP-9 but not membrane type 1-MMP and TIMP-2. The addition of recombinant TIMP-1 protein reduced the Matrigel invasion and Transwell migration of HT1080 cells, similar to TGF-beta1. Because augmentation of TIMP-1 might be the major factor for the anti-invasive and antimigrative activity of TGF-beta1, we investigated possible molecular mechanisms responsible for the expression of TIMP-1 induced by TGF-beta1. Treatment of HT1080 cells with TGF-beta1 rapidly phosphorylated three mitogen-activated protein kinases [MAPK; extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase] and Akt. Among these kinases, the inhibition of only ERK1/2 pathway by PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MAPK/ERK kinase(MEK)-1, and transfection of dominant-negative MEK 1 effectively blocked the TIMP-1 induction by TGF-beta1. Mithramycin, a specific inhibitor of Sp1 transcription factor, but not curcumin, an inhibitor of activator protein-1, and transfection of Sp1 small interfering RNA significantly inhibited the TGF-beta1-induced expression of TIMP-1. In addition, electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that TGF-beta1 up-regulated Sp1 DNA-binding activity, and PD98059 and mithramycin effectively inhibited these events. Finally, pretreatment of HT1080 cells with PD98059 and mithramycin, but not curcumin, restored the invasive activity of these cells. Taken together, these data suggest that TGF-beta1 modulates the net balance of the MMPs/TIMPs the systems in HT1080 cells for anti-invasion and antimigration by augmenting TIMP-1 through ERK1/2 pathway and Sp1 transcription factor.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2006 · Molecular Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: CD95/Fas is a cell surface protein that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. Signals through CD95/Fas are able to induce apoptosis in sensitive cells. Therefore, modalities to regulate the CD95/Fas expression level in tumor cells are called for. In the present study, we show that sublethal doses of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) sensitized CD95/Fas-induced apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells, and the sensitizing effects resulted from As2O3-mediated increase in the expression of the CD95/Fas. N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a specific scavenger of reactive oxygen species, abrogated As2O3-induced upregulation of CD95/Fas and enhancement of CD95/Fas-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-kappaB by transient transfection of IkappaBalpha supersurppessor blocked the increase of CD95/Fas expression following As2O2 treatment. Antisense oligonucleotide of CD95/Fas and ZB4, an antibody that blocks the binding of CD95/Fas ligand to CD95/Fas, reduced the amount of As2O3-sensitized CD95/Fas-induced apoptosis, demonstrating the specificity of CD95/Fas-binding ligands in the As2O3-sensitized CD95/Fas-induced apoptosis. These findings demonstrate that sensitization of human cervical cancer cells to CD95/Fas-mediated apoptosis by As2O3 can be partly due to induction of ROS and subsequent upregulation of CD95/Fas gene expression by NF-kappaB activation.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2004 · International Journal of Cancer
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    Preview · Article · Mar 2004 · Toxicology Letters
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    ABSTRACT: Silica has been known to be a factor in acute cell injury and chronic pulmonary fibrosis. In Rat2 fibroblasts, silica induced the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in regulating the expression of many genes involved in the subsequent inflammatory response. In addition, we observed that transforming growth factor-β activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) were involved in silica-mediated NF-κB activation in Rat2 cells. The dominant negative mutant forms of TAK1 and NIK inhibited the silica-induced NF-κB activation in Rat2 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that endogenous TAK1 is phosphorylated in silica-stimulated Rat2 cells. These results indicate that TAK1 functions as a critical mediator in the silica-induced signaling pathway.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2004 · Toxicology Letters
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    ABSTRACT: Silica has been known to be a factor in acute cell injury and chronic pulmonary fibrosis. In Rat2 fibroblasts, silica induced the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB), which plays a crucial role in regulating the expression of many genes involved in the subsequent inflammatory response. In addition, we observed that transforming growth factor-beta activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) were involved in silica-mediated NF-kappaB activation in Rat2 cells. The dominant negative mutant forms of TAK1 and NIK inhibited the silica-induced NF-kappaB activation in Rat2 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that endogenous TAK1 is phosphorylated in silica-stimulated Rat2 cells. These results indicate that TAK1 functions as a critical mediator in the silica-induced signaling pathway.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2003 · Toxicology Letters

Publication Stats

128 Citations
19.25 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004-2006
    • Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2003-2004
    • Catholic University of Korea
      • College of Medicine
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea