Heather L. Reynolds

Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, MI, United States

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Publications (4)46.11 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Human alteration of the global environment has triggered the sixth major extinction event in the history of life and caused widespread changes in the global distribution of organisms. These changes in biodiversity alter ecosystem processes and change the resilience of ecosystems to environmental change. This has profound consequences for services that humans derive from ecosystems. The large ecological and societal consequences of changing biodiversity should be minimized to preserve options for future solutions to global environmental problems.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2000 · Nature
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    ABSTRACT: Variation in competitive ability due to variation in soil characteristics is one possible mechanism allowing the local existence of plant species. We measured soil water, depth, and nitrogen pools and fluxes in distinct patches of three serpentine grassland species to determine whether soil heterogeneity existed and was correlated with plant species abundance. Through experimental manipulation of species' abundances, we also examined the relative importance of inherent site characteristics vs. plant species' effects in generating heterogeneity in the measured soil characteristics; and measured species' competitive abilities in different patch types. The three common grassland annuals, Calycadenia multiglandulosum, Plantago erecta, and Lasthenia californica, were segregated with respect to the measured soil characteristics. Differences in soil water, soil depth, soil microbial nitrogen, and soil carbon to nitrogen ratio were due to inherent site characteristics, while differences in nitrate availability were strongly affected by the identity of the species currently growing in a soil patch. Furthermore, all species performed significantly better against one other species in the patch type where they are normally most abundant. These results demonstrate that species diversity within this grassland contributes to soil heterogeneity and suggests that soil heterogeneity could contribute to the coexistence of these species.
    No preview · Article · Oct 1997 · Ecology
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Variation in competitive ability due to variation in soil characteristics is one possible mechanism allowing the local coexistence of plant species. We measured soil water, depth, and nitrogen pools and fluxes in distinct patches of three serpentine grassland species to determine whether soil heterogeneity existed and was correlated with plant species abundance. Through experimental manipulation of species' abundances, we also examined the relative importance of inherent site characteristics vs. plant species' effects in generating heterogeneity in the measured soil characteristics; and measured species' competitive abilities in different patch types. The three common grassland annuals, Calycadenia multiglandulosum, Plantago erecta, and Lasthenia californica, were segregated with respect to the measured soil characteristics. Differences in soil water, soil depth, soil microbial nitrogen, and soil carbon to nitrogen ratio were due to inherent site characteristics, while differences in nitrate availability were strongly affected by the identity of the species currently growing in a soil patch. Furthermore, all species performed significantly better against one other species in the patch type where they are normally most abundant. These results demonstrate that species diversity within this grassland contributes to soil heterogeneity and suggest that soil heterogeneity could contribute to the coexistence of these species.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 1997
  • H.L. Reynolds · F.S. III Chapin · C.B. Field
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    ABSTRACT: Atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients altered interspecific competitive performance of three grassland annuals, all exhibiting the C{sub 3} metabolic pathway. Plantago erecta, an herbaceous dicot dominant in low-fertility serpentine grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at low soil nutrients. Bromus hordeaceus, an introduced grass dominant in higher fertility sandstone grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Plantago was slightly enhanced under elevated CO{sub 2}, but only at high soil nutrients, whereas interspecific competitive ability of Bromus was stimulated under elevated CO{sub 2} at both low and high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Lasthenia californica, another herbaceous dicot common in serpentine grassland, was low in all treatments, and tended to decrease with elevated CO{sub 2} at low soil nutrients. Our results suggest that elevated CO{sub 2} may shift plant species abundance of serpentine grassland in favor of Bromus hordeaceus.
    No preview · Article · Jun 1995 · Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America