Florian Bruns

Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (10)0 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In recent years, the rights of patients have assumed a more pivotal role in international discussion. Stricter laws on the protection of patients place greater priority on the perspective and the status of patients. The purpose of this study is to emphasize ethical aspects in communication, the role of patient advocates as contacts for the concerns and suggestions of patients, and how many problems of ethics disappear when communication is highlighted. We reviewed 680 documented cases of consultation in a 10-year period of patient advocates' activity at a big German university hospital with 1,300 beds. On the basis of this extensive material, the article will focus on the intersection of the advocate's work with the problems of patients in hospitals. Deficits in the level of communication between health care professionals and patients were frequently uncovered. Patients primarily complain about the lack of dialogue and empathy. Middle-aged patients consulted the patients' advocate disproportionately more often. Measured against this baseline, the group of 65 and older complained less frequently. Besides complaints the advocate was asked in more than one-third of all cases for information about medical matters, hospital regulations or administrative problems. Patients obviously see the advocate as a well-connected and ideally unbiased contact person for uncertainties concerning their malady or a potential stay in hospital. Those seeking help often set hope in the information given by the voluntary patient representative. It should be highly recommended for every German hospital to establish the position of a patient advocate. Furthermore, patients can profit from regular exchange between the advocate and the Ethics Committee, also, to help ensure that their rights are taken into account and implemented in an ethically desirable context.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · HEC Forum
  • Florian Bruns
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    ABSTRACT: Die Klinische Ethik ist eine relativ junge Disziplin: die Kernphase ihrer institutionellen Entwicklung liegt in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts. Seither sind die ethischen Herausforderungen und potenziellen Konfliktfelder, die der modernen Medizin innewohnen, stetig gewachsen. Die rasante Ausweitung der Möglichkeiten sowohl der wissenschaftlich-forschenden als auch der klinisch-therapeutischen Medizin lässt beständig neue, bisher nicht gekannte Handlungsspielräume entstehen, die einer ethischen Reflexion bedürfen. Auch die zunehmende Pluralität der Werte in unserer weitgehend säkularisierten Gesellschaft, der steigende Einfluss juristischer Normen, die Verknappung finanzieller, personeller und zeitlicher Ressourcen sowie die wachsenden Autonomiebestrebungen immer besser informierter Patienten erhöhen den Bedarf an ethischer Orientierung in der Medizin (vgl. Rippe 1999, Vogd 2006).
    No preview · Chapter · Jan 2012
  • Florian Bruns
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    ABSTRACT: This article contributes to historical research on medical care in the GDR by using patients' written petitions to the Central Committee of the Socialist Party submitted in the 1980s. It investigates how patients experienced everyday medical care in the GDR beyond the ideals of official health policy. What were their experiences with doctors and nurses and what possibilities for managing conflicts did sick and needy people have? Starting with a critical consideration of sources and some remarks about the culture of petitioning in GDR society, the article provides insight into the lives of patients in the late GDR. An analysis of medical petitions reveals individual ways of coping with disease and indicates that patients made particular demands of the socialist state and its health system. Patients articulated their expectations quite critically, using characteristic patterns of argumentation and, at times, successfully exerting pressure on the regime to answer their demands.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Medizinhistorisches Journal
  • Florian Bruns

    No preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Kinderkrankenschwester: Organ der Sektion Kinderkrankenpflege / Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Sozialpadiatrie und Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Kinderheilkunde
  • Florian Bruns · Andreas Frewer
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    ABSTRACT: There is no doubt that emotions have an important effect on practices of moral reasoning such as clinical ethics consultation. Empathy is not only a basic human emotion but also an important and learnable skill for health care professionals. A basic amount of empathy is essential both in patient care and in clinical ethics consultation. This article debates the "adequate dose" of empathy in ethics consultations in clinical settings and tries to identify possible situations within the process of consultation in which this crucial feeling is at risk.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · HEC Forum

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Hoffnung auf Heilung richtet sich nicht nur an Ärzteschaft und Pflege – viele Personen im Gesundheitswesen sind gleichermaßen Ziel von Wünschen, Bitten oder Hoffnungsformen. Das Amt des Patientenfürsprechers ist dabei eine erstaunlich breite Projektionsfläche von ganz unterschiedlichen Erwartungen, die es gerechtfertigt erscheinen lassen, diese Person als „Hoffnungsträger“ hervorzuheben. Die im Folgenden wiedergegebenen Auszüge entstammen der Korrespondenz eines Patientenfürsprechers und illustrieren auf mehreren Ebenen das breite Spektrum an Hoffnungen und Erwartungen einerseits, sowie Enttäuschungen und Beschwerden andererseits, das sich in zahlreichen Anfragen an den Patientenfürsprecher widerspiegelt.
    No preview · Chapter · Jan 2010
  • Florian Bruns · Andreas Frewer
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    ABSTRACT: History of medicine played an important part in the ideology and policy of the Third Reich. The Nazi Party and the "Schutzstaffel" (SS) tried to instrumentalize historical knowledge to justify their ideology and medical ethics. The academic discipline of the history of medicine saw a revival during the Nazi period and, especially, during the Second World War. Important medical historians were eager to contribute to a symbiosis between the State and their field. The close relationship between the history of medicine and the Nazi regime was particularly apparent at Paul Diepgen's Department for the History of Medicine and Natural Sciences at the University of Berlin. Diepgen, apart from his own collaboration with the Nazi regime, was the teacher of Bernward J. Gottlieb who became the leading medical historian of the SS and Director of the new "SS-Institute for the History of Medicine" in Berlin in 1941. Gottlieb's institute moved in 1943 to the "SS-Academy" in Graz to train future SS-physicians in the history of medicine. The history of medicine was of great relevance also for certain members of the Nazi elite. They included Heinrich Himmler, the head of the SS, who ensured that Gottlieb would become Diepgen's successor in 1945 for the chair of medical history at the University of Berlin. Hitler was asked to intervene in the appointment process given the political importance of the field and, in particular, the professorship being located in Berlin. The SS was able to exercise, by this time, a decisive influence on the field of the history of medicine. Only the collapse of the Third Reich prevented the traditional discipline from becoming a "science" to legitimize the Nazi System and the SS. The aim of this paper is to examine the role of the field of the history of medicine and of its key institutions and personalities during the Third Reich.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2005 · Medizin, Gesellschaft, und Geschichte: Jahrbuch des Instituts für Geschichte der Medizin der Robert Bosch Stiftung
  • Andreas Frewer · Florian Bruns
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    ABSTRACT: What changes, if any, came with the so-called "new medical ethics" that was propagated during the Nazi period and the war of 1939-1945? This article analyses the context of the publication series "Ewiges Arzttum" ("eternal physicianship"), which was edited during World War II. The first volume--"Hippocrates"--included an introduction by the "Reichsführer-SS", Heinrich Himmler, and was edited by the "Reichsarzt-SS", Ernst Grawitz. B. J. Gottlieb, the medical historian who arranged the excerpts from Hippocratic texts, later headed an SS-Institute for the History of Medicine in Graz. Gottlieb was a pupil of Paul Diepgen, the head of the large Department for the History of Medicine and Natural Sciences at the University of Berlin. What were the goals of historians under National Socialism when they constructed continuities between the ethics of ancient times and the Nazi ethos? How did the moral points of view change under political pressure and in the circumstances of war? The series "Ewiges Arzttum", its context, and the correspondence between the persons involved are striking examples of the instrumentalisation of history for other purposes, even for "total war".
    No preview · Article · Feb 2004 · Medizinhistorisches Journal
  • Andreas Frewer · Florian Bruns
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: What changes, if any, came with the so-called "new medical ethics" that was propagated during the Nazi period and the war of 1939–1945? This article analyses the context of the publication series "Ewiges Arzttum" ("eternal physicianship"), which was edited during World War II. The first volume — "Hippocrates" — included an introduction by the "Reichsführer-SS", Heinrich Himmler, and was edited by the "Reichsarzt-SS", Ernst Grawitz. B. J. Gottlieb, the medical historian who arranged the excerpts from Hippocratic texts, later headed an SS-institute for the history of medicine in Graz. Gottlieb was a pupil of Paul Diepgen, the head of the large department for the history of medicine and natural sciences at the University of Berlin. What were the goals of historians under National Socialism when they constructed continuities between the ethics of ancient times and the Nazi ethos? How did the moral points of view change under political pressure and in the circumstances of war? The series "Ewiges Arzttum", its context, and the correspondence between the persons involved are striking examples of the instrumentalisation of history for other purposes, even for "total war". Läßt sich für die Zeit des Nationalsozialismus ein Wandel im Sinne einer „neuen Medizinethik” feststellen? Der vorliegende Beitrag analysiert die Publikationsreihe „Ewiges Arzttum”, die während des Zweiten Weltkriegs erschienen ist. Der erste Band — „Hippokrates” — wurde durch den „Reichsführer-SS” Heinrich Himmler eingeführt und vom „Reichsarzt-SS” Ernst Grawitz herausgegeben. B. J. Gottlieb, der Medizinhistoriker, der die Gedanken aus dem Corpus Hippocraticum zusammenstellte, leitete das SS-Institut für Geschichte der Medizin in Graz. Er war ein Schüler von Paul Diepgen, dem Leiter der seinerzeit größten Abteilung für Geschichte der Medizin an der Universität Berlin. Was waren die Intentionen und Ziele der Medizinhistoriker, als sie Kontinuitäten „ewigen Arzttums” von der Antike bis ins 20. Jahrhundert konstruierten? In welcher Weise änderten sich Ethos und Moral unter den Bedingungen von politischem Druck bzw. den Umständen des Krieges? Die Reihe „Ewiges Arzttum”, ihr Umfeld sowie die Korrespondenzen zwischen den Beteiligten sind ein eindrucksvolles Beispiel für die Instrumentalisierung der Disziplin Medizingeschichte für andere Zwecke, sogar im Dienste eines „totalen Krieges”.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2003 · Medizinhistorisches Journal

Publication Stats

7 Citations

Institutions

  • 2011
    • Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
      • Department of the History and Ethics of Medicine
      Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2005
    • Hannover Medical School
      • Institute for History, Ethics and Philosophy of Medicine
      Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany