C P Das

Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, Chandigarh, India

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Publications (31)45.38 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurological disorder without any well-documented genotype-demography associations among sporadic variants. We recently reported PARK2 mutations to be constituting 40% of PD in this region and thus analysed how demographic variables associate with PARK2 mutations in 70 of these patients. PD samples were screened by PCR single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and sequencing and their demographic data collected. Demographic and religion data was obtained from 1,010 randomly selected individuals of 120,000 patients visiting the Neurology Clinic and was compared with state database and PD patients. Sikhs from a rural background exhibited the majority of PARK2 mutations. The frequency of PARK2 mutations among females was significantly higher as compared to males (p < 0.015). The age of onset of PD patients with a rural background was found to be significantly lower as compared to patients with an urban background (p < 0.004). The demographic spectrum of the 1,010 randomly selected patients and the background population was found to be comparable. As PD patients with PARK2 mutations were found to be of sporadic origin and never-smokers, a non-redundant inverse relationship between founder PARK2 mutations and smoking is implicated to account for its high frequency. The predisposition of Sikhs to PARK2 mutations necessitates a larger study among its familial variants and a control smoker PD population. The spectrum of PARK2 mutations among Sikh smokers is difficult to study because of the religion-based aversion to smoking.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2010 · Neuroepidemiology
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    ABSTRACT: There is paucity of data regarding occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders in Asian women with epilepsy (WWE) on antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy. To determine the occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders in Indian WWE, by seizure type and the AED use. Consecutive 427 reproductive age WWE receiving various AEDs were screened for the occurrence of menstrual abnormalities, weight change, and hirsutism. Of these, 53 WWE with menstrual disturbances and/or hirsutism were further evaluated for ovarian morphology and reproductive hormonal profile. Menstrual abnormalities and/or hirsutism were observed in 83 of 427 (19.4%) WWE irrespective of epileptic seizure type; of these, 50 (60.2%) received valproate, 21 (25.3%) received carbamazepine, 11 (13.3%) received phenytoin, and one (1.2%) received phenobarbitone as the primary AED. Almost half of valproate-treated women had significant weight gain and obesity. Among 53 of 83 women evaluated further, 23.5% and 63.6% of valproate-treated women, 25% and 58.3% of carbamazepine-treated women, and none and 20% of phenytoin-treated women had polycystic ovaries (PCO) and hyperandrogenemia (HA), respectively. Valproate-treated women had significantly higher frequency of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) (11.8% vs. 2.5%, p < 0.0001) and mean serum testrosterone levels (1.78 vs. 1.36 ng/ml, p = 0.03), compared with women treated with other AEDs. Limitations include small number of women in antiepileptic subgroups and a high drop out rate in women who underwent ultrasound and endocrinological investigations. Menstrual abnormalities, weight gain, obesity, and PCOS are frequent and significantly higher in WWE receiving valproate, independent of seizure type.
    Full-text · Article · May 2008 · Epilepsia
  • A. Anand · S. Prabhakar · M. Vinish · M. Khullar · C. P. Das

    No preview · Article · Dec 2007 · Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
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    Sanjay Mishra · Chandi P Das · Ashim Das · Sudesh Prabhakar

    Full-text · Article · Oct 2007 · Neurology India
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    Chandi Prasad Das · Sudesh Prabhakar · Daniel Truong
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    ABSTRACT: We profiled 141 consecutive patients of writer's cramp (WC). Simple WC (n=108) had a mean (SD) disease duration of 3.65 (2.7) years and a severity score of 2.8 (0.91) by Burke-Fahn-Marden (BFM) scale (handwriting score: 0-4 ), whereas complex WC (n=33) had a disease duration of 5.8 (2.81) years and severity score of 3.6 (0.52). Compared with focal WC, generalized WC cases had longer disease duration, severer disability, and were older. Mirror dystonia was seen in 65 patients (46.1%). Co-existent Meige's syndrome (n=4) and cervical dystonia (n=6) were seen. Some patients had abnormal posturing of the neck (n=5) and of the oromandibular region (n=3) only while writing. Those receiving botulinum toxin fared significantly better than those on oral therapy, at 1 month post treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2007 · Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: To study the efficacy of splinting and oral steroids in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Prospective, randomized, open-label, clinical and electrophysiological study with 3-month follow-up. Forty patients with CTS were randomly divided into splint group (N-20), wearing splint in neutral position for 4 weeks; and steroid group (N-20), who received oral prednisolone 20 mg/day for 2 weeks followed by 10 mg/day for 2 weeks. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluations were done at baseline and at 1-month and 3-month follow-up. Independent 't' test and paired 't' test were used for statistical analysis. Primary outcome measure was the symptom severity score and functional status score. Secondary outcome measures were median nerve sensory and motor distal latency and conduction velocity. At the end of 3 months, statistically significant improvement was seen in symptom severity score and functional status score in both groups (P<0.001). Median nerve sensory distal latency and conduction velocity also improved significantly in both the groups at 3 months. Improvement in motor distal latency was significant (P=0.001) at 3 months in steroid group, while insignificant improvement (P=0.139) was observed in splint group. On comparing the clinical and electrophysiological improvement between the two groups, except for the functional status score, there was no significant difference at 3-month follow-up. Improvement in functional status score was significantly more in steroid group (P=0.03). There was significant improvement in both groups, clinically as well as electrophysiologically, at 3 months. On comparing the efficacy of the two treatment methods, except for the functional status score, there was no significant difference between the two groups.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2006 · Neurology India
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    ABSTRACT: X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (XALD) is an inherited disorder of peroxisomal metabolism. Atypical presentations have been occasionally reported in literature. However, extrapyramidal and cerebellar manifestations are distinctly rare. We report a patient of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy with cranial and cervical dystonia and neurological presentation resembling spinocerebellar degeneration followed by a brief review of relevant literature.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2006 · Neurology India
  • C P Das · D Dressler · M Hallett
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    ABSTRACT: The pathophysiology and management of writer's cramp is one of the most challenging amongst the various forms of focal dystonias. Frequently, the dystonic postures are confounded by compensatory muscle activity. Correct identification of target muscles for botulinum toxin (BT) injections determines the treatment success. The dosages of different preparations vary, with 1 unit of Botox roughly equalling 3.5 units of Dysport. Electromyographic guided injections yield better results and may also decrease the amount of toxin required. Weakness of target muscles interfering with other non-writing activities is a frequently encountered adverse effect. Studies have shown that BT is a safe long-term therapy option.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2006 · European Journal of Neurology
  • Das CP · Dressler D · Hallett M

    No preview · Article · Jan 2006 · European Journal of Neurology
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    M Modi · S Prabhakar · S Majumdar · M Khullar · V Lal · C P Das
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    ABSTRACT: Hyperhomocysteinemia has been proposed as an important risk factor for ischemic stroke worldwide, but data available from the Indian subcontinent is scarce. To study homocysteine levels in patients with ischemic stroke and compare it with age- and sex-matched controls. Case-control prospective study. Fifty-seven patients with ischemic stroke and 30 controls were recruited for the study. They were subdivided into two subgroups (< 40 years and> 40 years of age) and plasma fasting total homocysteine (tHcy) levels were measured. Student's 't' test and chi-square test. The tHcy were significantly high in patients with stroke, compared to controls (9.91 +/- 2.25 vs 8.00 +/- 2.74 micromol/l; P vs 8.45 +/- 2.72 micromol/l; P = 0.01) and female patients compared to controls (9.08 +/- 1.81 vs 6.79 +/- 2.60 micromol/l; P = 0.04). The tHcy levels were significantly high in patients with hypertension compared to normotensive patients (10.96 vs 9.49 micromol/l; P = 0.01) and smokers compared to nonsmokers (11.17 vs 9.33 micromol/l; P = 0.01). Hyperhomo-cysteinemia emerged as an important independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. A strong positive correlation was also observed between hypertension, smoking, and high-tHcy levels in the present study.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2005 · Neurology India
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    ABSTRACT: Peripheral neuropathy is usually the presenting feature of POEMS syndrome. Approximately 50% of patients with POEMS syndrome are associated with osteosclerotic myeloma, a rare variant of multiple myeloma, and some with Castleman's disease, an unusual lymphoproliferative disorder. The multicentric plasma cell variant of Castleman's disease is usually associated with systemic disorders rather than its localized form of mediastinal lymphoid hyperplasia characterized by hyalinization of follicles and interfollicular vascular proliferation. We report a 48-year-old woman who presented with progressive sensorimotor demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, bilateral optic disc edema, hepatosplenomegaly, generalized lymphadenopathy, and skin changes. There was associated thrombocytosis, hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, mixed osteolytic and osteosclerotic bone lesions, monoclonal gammopathy of IgG lambda type, and hyaline vascular type of Castleman's disease. This combination of POEMS syndrome, osteosclerotic myeloma with a hyaline vascular type of Castleman's disease is uncommon.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2005 · Journal of clinical neuromuscular disease
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    ABSTRACT: In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has shown significant prolongation of central motor conduction time (CMCT). Abnormal CMCT may reflect sub-clinical involvement of motor pathways and correlate with clinical motor disability. To determine the diagnostic yield of TMS in MS and the possible correlation of TMS abnormalities with clinical disability. Thirty patients with clinically definite MS presenting in acute relapse or with progressive disease course and 30 healthy controls were evaluated. TMS parameters evaluated included threshold intensity, motor evoked potentials (MEP) amplitudes and latencies and CMCT. Reassessment studies were done after three months. Student t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's rank correlation test were used to assess the relationships. Patients with MS had significantly higher threshold intensities, prolonged CMCT and reduced MEP amplitudes as compared to controls. Abnormalities in at least one parameter were observed in 86.7% of patients. When inter-side asymmetries in MEP latency and/or in CMCT were considered, the diagnostic yield increased to 96.7%. The diagnostic yield was 74.7% for visual evoked potentials, 13.3% for brainstem auditory evoked response and 10% for cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal band. One MS patient without pyramidal or cerebellar dysfunction had prolonged CMCT. CMCT abnormalities correlated significantly with the degree of pyramidal signs, limb ataxia, intention tremor, dysdiadokokinesia and overall cerebellar score. In patients who had clinical improvement, follow-up studies showed improvement in CMCT parameters. TMS is a highly sensitive technique to evaluate cortico-spinal conduction abnormalities in MS that may have no clinical correlate and in monitoring the course of the disease. The effects of cerebellar dysfunction on TMS results need further evaluation.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2005 · Neurology India
  • C P Das · S Joseph
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    ABSTRACT: Falls are a major health problem among the elderly and an estimated 6% of falls by elderly result in fractures. Early identification of fall risk is likely to result in earlier implementation of intervention and to minimise development of secondary problems such as reduced confidence and activity levels. A comprehensive falls risk factor assessment should be performed for older people who present for medical attention after a fall, those who had more than one fall in the preceding year or those who have abnormalities of gait or balance. Falls are as a result of extrinsic risk factors, intrinsic risk factor or a combination of both. Syncope is defined as a transient, self limited loss of consciousness usually leading to a fall. Syncope and falls are often considered two separate entities with different aetiologies. Disorders affecting balance in the elderly are cerebral, cerebellar, spinal cord disorders; dementia; arrhythmias; postural hypotension; cerebrovascular disease; musculoskeletal/orthopaedic disorders; intervertebral disc disorders; psychological factors; visual impairment. Effective interventions include: (1) Health promotion and falls prevention. (2) Single interventions. (3) Medication review. (4) Exercise. (5) Home modifications. (6) To improve safety in the home. (7) To improve safety outside the home. Effective preventive strategies require better understanding of the causes of and risk factors for falling among elderly.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2005 · Journal of the Indian Medical Association
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    ABSTRACT: Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) or idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology that is most often seen in obese women of reproductive age (19.3/100,000) and is reported only occasionally during pregnancy. Both pregnancy and exogenous estrogens are thought to promote IIH or worsen it. It can occur in any trimester during pregnancy, and the visual outcome is the same as for nonpregnant patients with IIH. There is no increase in fetal wastage; therapeutic abortion to limit its progression is not indicated, and subsequent pregnancies do not increase the risk of recurrence. Most therapies used during the nonpregnant state can also be used during pregnancy. The aim of treatment is to preserve vision and improve symptoms. Treatments include analgesics, diuretics, steroids, and serial lumbar punctures. When medical therapy fails, surgical procedures need to be considered. Although this condition has been reviewed often, the issue of mode of delivery, especially when papilledema has not resolved, is unclear. We report on 3 women with IIH during pregnancy and review the choice of therapy and mode of delivery.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2005 · MedGenMed: Medscape general medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Neuropathy in association with chronic liver disease, including cirrhosis, is recognized; however, there are differences in the incidence and type of neuropathy reported. The causal relationship of liver disease to neuropathy has been questioned. This study was designed to evaluate the incidence and character of peripheral neuropathy in patients with liver cirrhosis. The effect of alcohol consumption, severity of liver disease and encephalopathy on the incidence and severity of neuropathy were also studied. Patients having an identifiable cause of peripheral neuropathy, except alcohol, were excluded from the study. Patients with evidence of vitamin B12 deficiency or diabetes were also excluded from the study. In this study, 33 patients with liver cirrhosis were evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically to detect any evidence of peripheral neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies were performed in the upper and lower limbs using surface electrodes. These patients also underwent a detailed clinical examination. Clinical signs of peripheral neuropathy were found in seven (21%) patients. Nerve conduction studies were abnormal in 24 (73%) patients. The pattern of involvement was predominantly of an axonal sensory motor polyneuropathy. Neuropathy was found both in patients with alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related cirrhosis. The presence of encephalopathy did not have a significant bearing on the incidence and severity of neuropathy. The neuropathy was also not significantly related to the severity of liver disease. The present study reveals that a significant number of patients with liver cirrhosis show evidence of peripheral neuropathy, which is present regardless of the etiology of cirrhosis, and is subclinical in a majority of these patients. The cause of neuropathy was probably the liver disease itself, as the incidence and severity of neuropathy in the alcohol-related cirrhosis, although higher, was not significantly different from the neuropathy in patients with non-alcohol-related cirrhosis.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2003 · Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • R Bhatia · S Prabhakar · V Lal · D Khurana · C P Das
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    ABSTRACT: A patient with small cell lung cancer presented with a rare presentation of an acute onset pancerebellar dysfunction. His clinical condition markedly improved following the surgical removal of the tumor and chemo- and radiotherapy.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2003 · Neurology India
  • C P Das · S Prabhakar · V Lal · P S Kharbanda
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    ABSTRACT: A known case of scleroderma presented with right hemiparesis, focal seizures, optic atrophy and gangrene of digits. There was no evidence of peripheral nerve or muscle involvement. MRI showed multifocal infarcts in both cerebral hemispheres. MR angiography revealed poor flow in bilateral carotid arteries with collateralization from posterior circulation. She improved with phenytoin, nifedipine, antibiotics and immunosuppressants. The rarity of central nervous system affliction in scleroderma and large vessel vasculitis is discussed along with review of literature.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2003 · Neurology India
  • P S Kharbanda · S Prabhakar · V Lal · C P Das
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    ABSTRACT: Papilledema and raised intracranial pressure have been reported in association with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Papilledema is usually asympotomatic or associated with mild visual field defects, without any visual loss. The cerebrospinal fluid protein is usually reported to be high. A case of a 35 year old lady is reported, who presented with headache, diplopia and progressive visual loss in both eyes and limb weakness with hyporeflexia. Optic fundus examination showed bilateral papilledema. She had features of pseudotumor cerebri. Nerve conduction studies were suggestive of polyradiculopathy. The unusual things in this case, were the profound visual loss normal cerebrospinal fluid profiles and the presentation of papilledema before the limb weakness.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2003 · Neurology India
  • S K Handa · C P Das · S Prabhakar

    No preview · Article · Apr 2002 · Neurology India
  • C P Das · S Prabhakar · V Lal · P.S. Kharbanda
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    ABSTRACT: A known case of scleroderma presented with right hemiparesis, focal seizures, optic atrophy and gangrene of digits. There was no evidence of peripheral nerve or muscle involvement. MRI showed multifocal infarcts in both cerebral hemispheres. MR angiography revealed poor flow in bilateral carotid arteries with collateralization from posterior circulation. She improved with phenytoin, nifedipine, antibiotics and immunosuppressants. The rarity of central nervous system affliction in scleroderma and large vessel vasculitis is discussed along with review of literature.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2002