Andrea M Cevasco

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States

Are you Andrea M Cevasco?

Claim your profile

Publications (9)7.2 Total impact

  • Andrea M Cevasco
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In healthcare settings, medical professionals' nonverbal behavior impacts patients' satisfaction and long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional well-being. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of a music therapist's nonverbal behavior, affect and proximity, on participation and affect of 38 individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other related dementia (ADRD) during movement-to-music, singing, and instrument playing. Data indicated 62% of the individuals evinced positive affect when the therapist utilized affect and proximity combined, followed by the affect only condition (53%), proximity only condition (30%), and no affect or proximity condition (28%). A Friedman analysis indicated a significant difference in individuals' affect according to treatment conditions, chi(r)2 (3, 4) = 34.05, p = .001. Nonverbal behavior also impacted individuals' accuracy of participation, with participation at 79% for both affect and proximity combined, 75% for affect only, 71% for no affect or proximity, and 70% for proximity only. A significant difference occurred for participation by treatment conditions, F (3, 111) = 4.05, p = .009, eta2 = .10. Clinical implications are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Journal of music therapy
  • Kimberly VanWeelden · Andrea M Cevasco
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purposes of the current study were to determine geriatric clients' recognition of 32 popular songs and songs from musicals by asking whether they: (a) had heard the songs before; (b) could "name the tune" of each song; and (c) list the decade that each song was composed. Additionally, comparisons were made between the geriatric clients' recognition of these songs and by music therapy students' recognition of the same, songs, based on data from an earlier study (VanWeelden, Juchniewicz, & Cevasco, 2008). Results found 90% or more of the geriatric clients had heard 28 of the 32 songs, 80% or more of the graduate students had heard 20 songs, and 80% of the undergraduates had heard 18 songs. The geriatric clients correctly identified 3 songs with 80% or more accuracy, which the graduate students also correctly identified, while the undergraduates identified 2 of the 3 same songs. Geriatric clients identified the decades of 3 songs with 50% or greater accuracy. Neither the undergraduate nor graduate students identified any songs by the correct decade with over 50% accuracy. Further results are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2010 · Journal of music therapy
  • A. M. Cevasco · K. Vanweelden
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The primary purposes of this study were to: 1 ) create an alphabetical list of songs by decade from the 1900s–1960s from four songbook series, which music therapists might utilize to locate songs for older adult populations, and 2) compare the songbook series list with the list from the VanWeelden and Cevasco (2007) study. Four songbook series were selected and analyzed for song title, publication date, publisher information, ISBN numbers, and number of pages for each volume. Duplicate listings were deleted so song titles were only listed once, regardless of decade, and compiled resulting in a master list of a total of 1,896 songs. Eighty-six of these songs were listed in all four series. Of the 288 songs listed from the VanWeelden and Cevasco (2007) study, 200 songs were also found within the master list in at least one of the four songbook series. Further results and clinical training implications are provided.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Music Therapy Perspectives
  • Kimberly VanWeelden · Andrea M Cevasco
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Researchers suggest popular music to be primarily preferred by seniors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine geriatric clients' preferences for particular popular songs to possibly use in singing activities. Specifically, the researchers sought to determine whether the seniors' had heard the song before, generally preferred the songs, and would prefer to sing the songs. The researchers also examined whether possible preferences adhered to the "young adult years" age hypothesis, as stated in previous research. Results indicated that nine songs had been previously heard by 100% of the participants, with five of these songs from the 1910s and earlier. The greatest number of participants preferred the song Over the Rainbow "a lot", and the greatest number of participants indicated that they would like to sing In the Good Old Summertime, Let Me Call You Sweetheart, You are My Sunshine, and By the Light of the Silvery Moon. Further results and discussion are included.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2009 · Journal of music therapy
  • Kimberly Vanweelden · Jay Juchniewicz · Andrea M Cevasco
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Previous research has found that music therapists, who work with geriatric clients in singing activities, indicated they know and use 3 times more popular or popular style music (songs from musicals) than folk songs. The purposes of the current study were to determine music therapy majors' recognition of popular songs and songs from musicals by asking whether they: (a) had heard the songs before, (b) could "name the tune" of each song, and (c) list the decade each song was composed. Results showed that students had previously heard many of the songs; however, this was not an indication of whether they could name the song title or the decade in which it was composed. Additionally, percentage data indicated that My Favorite Things and You Are My Sunshine were the most heard/recognized songs, Over the Rainbow was the most correctly named song title, and Five Foot Two, Eyes of Blue was the song most correctly identified by decade. Further results and discussion are included.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2008 · Journal of music therapy
  • Source
    Andrea M Cevasco
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of mothers' singing on their adjustment to and bonding with their new infants as well as use of music in the home environment in the first 2 weeks after their infants' birth. Preterm mothers were assessed for coping with their infants' NICU stay, and premature infants' length of hospitalization was evaluated. Fifty-four full-term infants and mothers and 20 premature infants and 16 mothers were randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions. Mothers in both experimental groups were recorded singing songs of their choice for use at home. Recordings of each preterm mother's voice were played 20 minutes per day, 3 to 5 times per week, at a time when she was not able to visit her infant in the NICU. All full-term and preterm mothers in experimental and control groups completed a posttest survey 2 weeks after infants were discharged. Comparisons revealed that experimental preterm and full-term mothers indicated less adjustment to their baby and lifestyle changes and less bonding compared to control mothers, though this difference was not significant. Preterm and full-term experimental mothers reported the greatest number of postpartum medical complications, which might explain their poor adjustment and bonding scores. There was a significant difference between mothers' value of music, with preterm experimental valuing music more. Preterm and full-term experimental mothers used music with and sang to infants more compared to preterm and full-term control mothers, but not to a significant degree. Preterm mothers reported a mean score of 4.75 (with a 5 indicating that they strongly my singing helped me to cope with my infant's stay in the NICU. Furthermore, preterm, infants who listened to the CD recording of their mothers' singing left the hospital an average of 2 days sooner than those in the control group, though this difference was not significant.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2008 · Journal of music therapy
  • K. VanWeelden · A. M. Cevasco

    No preview · Article · Jan 2007 · Music Therapy Perspectives
  • Andrea M Cevasco · Roy E Grant
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the value of designated musical instruments used by the therapist to elicit responses from persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) during group sessions. In Experiment 1, 15 individuals in the early and middle stages of AD echoed rhythm patterns played by the therapist via the djembe, claves, paddle drum, and maraca. Results indicated significance for the rhythm patterns used, p < .05, and the types of instruments used, p < .05. A significant difference occurred for interaction of instruments by rhythms, p < .001. Rhythmic accuracy was highest when the therapist presented rhythms on the djembe, followed by the paddle drum, maraca, and claves. The most accurate rhythm pattern was 8 eighth-notes, the second most accurate was 4 quarter-notes, and the third was 2 eighths followed by a quarter note, repeated. Ten individuals in the middle to later stages of AD participated in Experiment 2. The treatment conditions consisted of 6 musical instruments used by the therapists to elicit responses during movement, singing, and rhythm activities. Average participation at any level (singing and moving/playing, singing only, and moving/playing only) in the 6 treatment conditions was highest during a cappella singing (63%), followed by djembe (61%), keyboard (60%), guitar and djembe (57%), and then guitar (54%) and autoharp (54%). Average participation at any level in the four activities, without any consideration of instruments, was as follows: 83% for the rhythm activity, 51% for the movement activity, and 49% for the first as well as second singing activity. Results indicated significant differences for the treatment conditions, p < .001, and for types of activities, p < .05. Significant difference, p < .01, occurred for interaction of treatment condition by activity.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2006 · Journal of music therapy
  • Andrea M Cevasco · Roy E Grant
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Within the past 5 years there has been an increase of premature infants surviving in the neonatal intensive care unit as well as an increasing cost for each day the infant is kept there. It is important for the premature infant to acquire the feeding skills necessary for weight gain, which lead to discharge from the hospital, and recent advancements have indicated the effectiveness in using contingent music to teach sucking skills to premature infants. The purpose of the first analysis in this study was to determine the effects of Pacifier Activated Lullaby (PAL) trials on weight gain of premature infants. During a 2-year time period, 62 infants from a sample of 188 met criteria for analysis. A one-way analysis of variance showed no significance in daily weight gain for the number of PAL trials completed. The mean weight gains for infants with 1 PAL trial = 13.85 grams, 2 trials = 26.67, 3 trials = 29.64, and 4 or more = 22.89. The Pearson product-moment correlation between the mean percent of music earned via nonnutritive sucking (NNS) and mean weight gain of all trials approached significance (p = .077, r = 0.18). In a second analysis, weight gained prior to use of PAL, during use of PAL, and post use of PAL was analyzed. Results indicated no significant difference between weight gain 1 day prior to use of PAL, the day of PAL trial, and 1 day post use of PAL. Mean weight gain for those infants who participated in 1 PAL trial was 8.49 grams for 1 day prior to use of PAL, 18.73 the day of PAL trial, and 24.81 for 1 day post use of PAL. Mean weight gain for 3 days prior to using the PAL was 10.78, 11.30 on the day of PAL trial, and 24.78 grams for 3 days post PAL use. The analyses show definite trends of greater weight gain with PAL use; however, individual variability within groups was greater than group differences leading to no significance in statistical analysis. In the third analysis the effect of proximity between premature infants' feeding schedule and PAL trial on amount of time the infant received contingent music via NNS was examined; the infants' feeding and sleep schedules were divided into 5 blocks of time. Results indicated no statistical significance among the amount of time premature infants sucked/received music according to their schedule, although there were noticeable differences in the average percent of music reinforcement received according to assigned block. Infants who participated in PAL trials 30 minutes prior to feeding scored the highest average at 77.25 %, followed by 71% for infants who participated in PAL trials during feeding. Other times, primarily after the infants' feeding, resulted in averages of 59% and 54.5%; these infants often fell asleep after their feeding and did not complete the full 15-minute trial. Based on this research and previous research on NNS, it seems beneficial for premature infants to participate in PAL opportunities 30 minutes prior to feeding.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2005 · Journal of music therapy
  • Andrea M Cevasco · Roy Kennedy · Natalie Ruth Generally
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Over the past several decades the number of females using addictive substances has continuously increased. Females have different reasons for initiating substance abuse and specific treatment needs that differ from males. Researchers suggested gender specific drug rehabilitation treatment, in which female clients developed or improved functional behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 3 different types of music therapy interventions on levels of depression, stress, anxiety, and anger of female clients in substance abuse rehabilitation. Ten females in an outpatient substance abuse rehabilitation program participated twice a week for 6 weeks in a music therapy program, participating in movement-to-music activities, rhythm activities, and competitive games for 2 weeks, 4 sessions each. After each intervention state-trait anxiety and levels of anger were measured. A repeated-measures ANOVA indicated no significant differences for the three types of music therapy interventions; however, data collected on daily scores, immediately before and after each session, indicated that individuals reported a decrease in depression, stress, anxiety, and anger immediately following the music therapy sessions.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2005 · Journal of music therapy
  • Source
    Andrea M Cevasco · Roy E Grant
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many of the noted problems associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) sometimes can be delayed, retarded, or even reversed with proper exercise and interaction with the environment. An overwhelming body of research efforts has revealed that music activity brings about the greatest degree of responsiveness, including exercise, in clients with AD; yet, specific techniques which elicit the greatest amount of physical responses during the music activities remain unidentified. The purpose of this study was two-fold: comparing two methods of intervention and comparing responses to vocal versus instrumental music during exercise and exercise with instruments. In Experiment 1 the authors compared 2 treatment conditions to facilitate exercise during music activities: (a) verbalizing the movement for each task once, one beat before commencing, followed by visual cueing for the remainder of the task; (b) verbal and visual cueing for each revolution or change in rhythm for the duration of the task. Data collection over 38 sessions consisted of recording the participation of each client at 30-second intervals for the duration of each treatment condition, indicating at each interval whether the client was participating in the designated movement (difficult), participating in exercise approximating the designated movement (easy), or not participating. Results indicated that the continuous verbal cueing/easy treatment elicited significantly greater participation than one verbal cue/difficult treatment, p <.05. Furthermore, the approximation/precise response (easy) resulted in significantly greater responses than the precise response (difficult), p < .001. In Experiment 2 the responses to types of music, vocal versus instrumental, during types of activities, exercise with and without instruments, were examined. Data were collected over 26 sessions, 52 activities, in the same 2 assisted living facilities as those in Experiment 1, but one year later Results indicated that both the type of activity and the type of music had some effect on participation. Also, data indicated participation in exercise to instrumental music was significantly greater than exercise with instruments to vocal music, p <.05.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2003 · Journal of music therapy

Publication Stats

134 Citations
7.20 Total Impact Points

Top Journals

Institutions

  • 2008-2010
    • University of Alabama
      Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States
  • 2003-2006
    • University of Georgia
      Атина, Georgia, United States