A. Valishev

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Батавия, Illinois, United States

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Publications (77)48.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Colliding bunch trains in a circular collider demands a certain crossing angle in order to separate the two beams transversely after the collision. The magnitude of this crossing angle is a complicated function of the bunch charge, the number of long-range beam-beam interactions, of beta* and type of optics (flat or round), and possible compensation or additive effects between several low-beta insertions in the ring depending on the orientation of the crossing plane at each interaction point. About 15 years ago, the use of current bearing wires was proposed at CERN in order to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects [J. P. Koutchouk, CERN Report No. LHC-Project-Note 223, 2000], therefore offering the possibility to minimize the crossing angle with all the beneficial effects this might have: on the luminosity performance by reducing the need for crab-cavities or lowering their voltage, on the required aperture of the final focus magnets, on the strength of the orbit corrector involved in the crossing bumps, and finally on the heat load and radiation dose deposited in the final focus quadrupoles. In this paper, a semianalytical approach is developed for the compensation of the long-range beam-beam interactions with current wires. This reveals the possibility of achieving optimal correction through a careful adjustment of the aspect ratio of the beta functions at the wire position. We consider the baseline luminosity upgrade plan of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC project), and compare it to alternative scenarios, or so-called "configurations," where modifications are applied to optics, crossing angle, or orientation of the crossing plane in the two low-beta insertions of the ring. For all these configurations, the beneficial impact of beam-beam compensation devices is then demonstrated on the tune footprint, the dynamical aperture, and/or the frequency map analysis of the nonlinear beam dynamics as the main figures of merit.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, the study of integrable Hamiltonian systems has led to nonlinear accelerator lattices with one or two transverse invariants and wide stable tune spreads. These lattices may drastically improve the performance of high-intensity machines, providing Landau damping to protect the beam from instabilities, while preserving dynamic aperture. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is being built at Fermilab to study these concepts with 150-MeV pencil electron beams (single-particle dynamics) and 2.5-MeV protons (dynamics with self fields). One way to obtain a nonlinear integrable lattice is by using the fields generated by a magnetically confined electron beam (electron lens) overlapping with the circulating beam. The required parameters are similar to the ones of existing devices. In addition, the electron lens will be used in cooling mode to control the brightness of the proton beam and to measure transverse profiles through recombination. More generally, it is of great interest to investigate whether nonlinear integrable optics allows electron coolers to exceed limitations set by both coherent or incoherent instabilities excited by space charge.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015
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    V. Shiltsev · P. Hurh · A. Romanenko · A. Valishev · R. Zwaska
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    ABSTRACT: Recent P5 report indicated the accelerator-based neutrino and rare decay physics research as a centrepiece of the US domestic HEP program. Operation, upgrade and development of the accelerators for the near-term and longer-term particle physics program at the Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges. Here we discuss accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: After a long preparatory phase, including a wide hardware consolidation program, the Italian lepton collider DAFNE, is now systematically delivering data to the KLOE-2 experiment. In approximately 200 days of operation 1 fb-1 has been given to the detector limiting the background to a level compatible with an efficient data acquisition. Instantaneous and maximum daily integrated luminosity measured, so far, are considerably higher with respect to the previous KLOE runs, and are: L(inst) ~ 2.0 1032 cm-2s-1, and L(day) ~ 12.5 pb-1 respectively. A general review concerning refurbishing activities, machine optimization efforts and data taking performances is presented and discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015
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    M. Zobov · A. Drago · A. Gallo · C. Milardi · D. Shatilov · A. Valishev

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
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    A. Valishev · D. Shatilov · C. Milardi · M. Zobov

    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2015
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    A. Valishev · D. Shatilov · C. Milardi · M. Zobov
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    ABSTRACT: Current bearing wire compensators were successfully used in the 2005-2006 run of the DA{\Phi}NE collider to mitigate the detrimental effects of parasitic beam-beam interactions. A marked improvement of the positron beam lifetime was observed in machine operation with the KLOE detector. In view of the possible application of wire beam-beam compensators for the High Luminosity LHC upgrade, we revisit the DA{\Phi}NE experiments. We use an improved model of the accelerator with the goal to validate the modern simulation tools and provide valuable input for the LHC upgrade project.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015
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    M. Zobov · A. Drago · A. Gallo · C. Milardi · D. Shatilov · A. Valishev
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    ABSTRACT: After the successful completion of the SIDDHARTA experiment run with crab waist collisions, the electron- positron collider DA{\Phi}NE has started routine operations for the KLOE-2 detector. The new interaction region also exploits the crab waist collision scheme, but features certain complications including the experimental detector solenoid, compensating anti-solenoids, and tilted quadrupole magnets. We have performed simulations of the beam-beam collisions in the collider taking into account the real DA{\Phi}NE nonlinear lattice. In particular, we have evaluated the effect of crab waist sextupoles and beam-beam interactions on the DA{\Phi}NE dynamical aperture and energy acceptance, and estimated the luminosity that can be potentially achieved with and without crab waist sextupoles in the present working conditions. A numerical analysis has been performed in order to propose possible steps for further luminosity increase in DA{\Phi}NE such as a better working point choice, crab sextupole strength optimization, correction of the phase advance between the sextupoles and the interaction region. The proposed change of the e- ring working point was implemented and resulted in a significant performance increase.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015
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    Mikhail Zobov · Dmitry Shatilov · Alexander Valishev · Catia Milardi

    Full-text · Dataset · Apr 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Proton accumulator rings and other circular hadron accelerators are susceptible to intensity-driven parametric instabilities because the zero-current charged particle dynamics are characterized by a single tune. Landau damping can suppress these instabilities, which requires energy spread in the beam or introducing nonlinear magnets such as octupoles. However, this approach reduces dynamic aperture. Nonlinear integrable optics can suppress parametric instabilities independent of energy spread in the distribution, while preserving the dynamic aperture. This novel approach promises to reduce particle losses and enable order-of-magnitude increases in beam intensity. In this paper we present results, obtained using the Lie operator formalism, on how chromaticity and dispersion affect particle orbits in integrable optics. We conclude that chromaticity in general breaks the integrability, unless the vertical and horizontal chromaticities are equal. Because of this, the chromaticity correcting magnets can be weaker and fewer correcting magnet families are required, thus minimizing the impact on dynamic aperture.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015
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    S. A. Antipov · S. Nagaitsev · A. Valishev
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    ABSTRACT: At Integrable Optics Test Accelerator it is possible to create a nonlinear focusing optics with one invariant of motion using just conventional magnets. 6D simulations show that this will allow to achieve a tune spread of 0.05 without significant reduction of dynamic aperture.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2015
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    V. Shiltsev · A. Valishev
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    ABSTRACT: Long-range beam-beam effects occurred in the Tevatron at all stages (injection, ramp, squeeze, and collisions) and affected both proton and antiproton beams. They resulted in beam losses and emittance blow-ups, which occurred in remarkable bunch-to-bunch dependent patterns. On the way to record-high luminosities of the collider, many issues related to the long-range beam-beam interactions have been addressed. Below we present a short overview of the long-range beam-beam effects in the Tevatron. (For a detailed discussion on the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron please see reviews in Refs. [1-3] and references therein).
    Preview · Article · Oct 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profileis shapedto obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. A conceptual design was recently completed, and the project is moving towards a technical design in 2014-2015 for construction in 2015-2017, if needed, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing collimation needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014
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    ABSTRACT: The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), currently in commissioning phase at Fermilab is foreseen to support a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop novel approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation. ASTA incorporates a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linac coupled to a flexible high-brightness photoinjector. The facility also includes a small-circumference storage ring capable of storing electrons or protons. This report summarizes the facility capabilities, and provides an overview of the accelerator-science researches to be enabled.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014
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    ABSTRACT: The DAΦNE collider has been successfully commissioned after implementing major modification of the experimental detector and a general upgrade-consolidation program involving, although to a different extent, all the accelerator complex subsystems. This paper presents the Φ-Factory setup and the achieved performances in terms of beam dynamics, luminosity, detector background and related aspects.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jun 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Beam-beam forces and collision optics can strongly affect beam lifetime, dynamic aperture, and halo formation in particle colliders. Extensive analytical and numerical simulations are carried out in the design and operational stage of a machine to quantify these effects, but experimental data is scarce. The technique of small-step collimator scans was applied to the Fermilab Tevatron collider and to the CERN Large Hadron Collider to study the effect of collisions on transverse beam halo dynamics. We describe the technique and present a summary of the first results on the dependence of the halo diffusion coefficient on betatron amplitude in the Tevatron and in the LHC.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013
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    Giulio Stancari · Alexander Valishev
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    ABSTRACT: At the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we studied the feasibility of suppressing the antiproton head-on beam-beam tune spread using a magnetically confined 5-keV electron beam with Gaussian transverse profile overlapping with the circulating beam. When electron cooling of antiprotons was applied in regular Tevatron operations, the nonlinear head-on beam-beam effect on antiprotons was small. Therefore, we first focused on the operational aspects, such as beam alignment and stability, and on fundamental observations of tune shifts, tune spreads, lifetimes, and emittances. We also attempted two special collider stores with only 3 proton bunches colliding with 3 antiproton bunches, to suppress long-range forces and enhance head-on effects. We present here the results of this study and a comparison between numerical simulations and observations. These results contributed to the application of this compensation concept to RHIC at Brookhaven.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2013
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    G. Stancari · A. Valishev · S. M. White
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    ABSTRACT: A system for bunch-by-bunch detection of transverse proton and antiproton coherent oscillations in the Fermilab Tevatron collider is described. It is based on the signal from a single beam-position monitor located in a region of the ring with large amplitude functions. The signal is digitized over a large number of turns and Fourier-analyzed offline with a dedicated algorithm. To enhance the signal, band-limited noise is applied to the beam for about 1 s. This excitation does not adversely affect the circulating beams even at high luminosities. The device has a response time of a few seconds, a frequency resolution of $1.6\times 10^{-5}$ in fractional tune, and it is sensitive to oscillation amplitudes of 60 nm. It complements Schottky detectors as a diagnostic tool for tunes, tune spreads, and beam-beam effects. Measurements of coherent mode spectra are presented and compared with models of beam-beam oscillations.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2013