R. Salmon

Institut Curie, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (57)

  • Article · Dec 2012 · Cancer Research
  • Article · Apr 2011 · Cancer Research
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Phyllodes tumors are a rare distinctive fibroepithelial tumors of the breast and their management continues to be questioned. The aim of our study was to examine the treatment and outcome of 165 patients with phyllodes tumors and to review the options for surgical management. This is a retrospective study of 165 patients who presented to the Institut Curie between January 1994 and November 2008 for benign, borderline or malignant phyllodes tumors. The median follow-up was 12.65 months [range 0-149.8]. The median age at diagnosis was 44 years [range 17-79]. One hundred and sixty patients (97%) had breast-conserving treatment, of whom 3 patients (1.8%) had oncoplastic breast surgery. Younger women had a significantly higher chance of having a benign phyllodes tumor (p = 0.0001) or a tumor of small size (p < 0.0001). Histologic examination showed 114 benign (69%), 37 borderline (22%) and 14 malignant tumors (9%). The median tumor size was 30 mm [range 5-150]. The tumor margins were considered incomplete (< 10 mm) in 46 out of 165 cases (28%) with 52% revision surgery. Only the tumor grade was a significant risk factor for incomplete tumor margins (p = 0.005). Fifteen patients developed local recurrence (10%) and two, metastases. In univariate analysis, the histologic grade (p = 0.008), and tumor size (p = 0.02) were significative risk factors for local recurrence with an accentuated risk for "borderline" tumors and tumors of large size.).Similar results were obtained using multivariate analysis (p = 0.07). The mainstay of treatment for phyllodes tumors remains excision with a safe surgical margin, taking advantage breast conserving surgery where amenable. For borderline or malignant phyllodes tumors or in cases of local tumor recurrence, mastectomy, and immediate breast reconstruction may become the preferred option. Genetic analysis will potentially supplement classical histologic examination in order to improve our management of these tumors. The role of adjuvant treatments is unproven and must be considered on a case-by-case basis.
    Article · Mar 2011 · The Breast Journal
  • Article · Feb 2010 · Oncologie
  • S. Alran · R. Salmon
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The status of the axillary lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor in breast cancer. Positive sentinel lymph node may be divided into two categories: metastatic, that is, pN1, and minimal lymph node involvement, that is, pN1mi and pN0i+. Postoperative management of pN1 patients following SNB (sentinel node biopsy) is same as pN1 patients following axillary lymph node dissection, whereas postoperative management of pN1mi and pN0i+ patients is still debated, with a trend to do a complementary axillary lymph node dissection because of the risk of positive-non-SNB. This risk is evaluated approximately 1015% (reclassifying in pN1) and can modify irradiation fields and adjuvant systemic therapy. Recent papers concerning the prognosis of these patients are published since 2008. The size of node metastasis seems to be correlated with 5-year distant free metastasis survival as well as the 10-year overall survival and has been described as a decisive factor for adjuvant systemic therapy. Analysis of lymphatic dissemination remains necessary in the management of breast cancer, and analysis of minimal lymph node involvement gives the surgeons an opportunity to play a role in optimizing the postoperative treatment and the prognosis of our patients.
    Article · Jan 2010 · Oncologie
  • S. Alran · R. Salmon
    Article · Jan 2010 · Oncologie
  • Source
    M. G. Berry · A. Fitoussi · F. Fama · [...] · R. Salmon
    Full-text Article · Nov 2009 · European Journal of Surgical Oncology
  • Article · Nov 2009 · European Journal of Surgical Oncology
  • Article · Sep 2009 · EJC Supplements
  • P. Mariani · T. Dorval · M. Neel · [...] · O. Lantz
    Article · Sep 2009 · EJC Supplements
  • S Haberer · M Laé · V Seegers · [...] · M-A Bollet
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Given the scarcity of malignant phyllode tumours of the breast and the absence of consensus regarding their management justify the need for institutional retrospective evaluations of clinical practices. Retrospective study with central pathology review of the 25 consecutive patients treated at the Institut Curie (Paris, France) between 1969 and 2006 for non metastatic malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast. The median follow-up was 65 months (7-257 months). Median age at diagnosis was 52 years (20-64 years). Breast surgery was conservative in five patients (20%). Surgical margins were wide (> 10mm), narrow, involved or unknown in respectively 17 (68%), three (12%), three (12%) and two (8%) patients. Median tumour size was 65 mm (12-250 mm). Adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered in seven (28%) patients (two patients, post-tumorectomy; five patients, post-mastectomy) and 13 patients (52%) received anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Five-year overall survival rate was 91% (95% CI, 80-100%). Five patients (20%) developed distant metastases (one after chemotherapy) and three (12%) locoregional relapse (one after tumorectomy and unknown margin without radiotherapy, two after mastectomy and involved margins with radiotherapy). Wide breast surgery (that can be conservative in selected patients) is the mainstay of the treatment of non metastatic malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast. To better determine the respective roles of adjuvant systemic treatment and radiotherapy, further clinical studies and the search for new prognostic and predictive factors remain necessary.
    Article · Jul 2009 · Cancer/Radiothérapie
  • Alfred Fitoussi · Fatima Laki · Benoit Coutureau · [...] · Remy Salmon
    Article · Jul 2009 · Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We sought to determine whether the levels of expression of 17 candidate genes were associated with locoregional control after breast-conserving treatments of early-stage breast cancers in young, premenopausal women. Gene expression was measured by using RT-PCR in the breast tumors of a series of 53 young (younger than 40 years), premenopausal patients. All treatments consisted of primary breast-conserving surgery followed by whole-breast radiotherapy (+/- regional lymph nodes) with or without systemic treatments (chemotherapy +/- hormone therapy). The median follow-up was 10 years. The 10-year locoregional control rate was 70% (95% CI, 57% to 87%). In univariate analysis, no clinical/pathologic prognostic factors were found to be significantly associated with decreased locoregional control. Expression of three genes was found to be significantly associated with an increased locoregional recurrence rate: low estrogen-receptor beta, low aromatase, and high GATA3. Two others were associated with only a trend (P < 0.10): low HER1 and SKP2. In multivariate analysis, only the absence of aromatase was significantly associated with an increased locoregional recurrence rate (P = 0.003; relative risk = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.82). Recent data give credit to the fact that breast cancer in young women is a distinct biologic entity driven by special oncogenic pathways. Our results highlight the role of estrogen-signaling pathways (mainly CYP19/aromatase, GATA3, and ER-beta) in the risk of locoregional recurrence of breast cancer in young women. Confirmation in larger prospective studies is needed.
    Full-text Article · Jul 2009 · Breast cancer research: BCR
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: PurposeGiven the scarcity of malignant phyllode tumours of the breast and the absence of consensus regarding their management justify the need for institutional retrospective evaluations of clinical practices.Patients and methodsRetrospective study with central pathology review of the 25 consecutive patients treated at the Institut Curie (Paris, France) between 1969 and 2006 for non metastatic malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast. The median follow-up was 65 months (7–257 months).ResultsMedian age at diagnosis was 52 years (20–64 years). Breast surgery was conservative in five patients (20%). Surgical margins were wide (> 10 mm), narrow, involved or unknown in respectively 17 (68%), three (12%), three (12%) and two (8%) patients. Median tumour size was 65 mm (12–250 mm). Adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered in seven (28%) patients (two patients, posttumorectomy; five patients, postmastectomy) and 13 patients (52%) received anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Five-year overall survival rate was 91% (95% CI, 80–100%). Five patients (20%) developed distant metastases (one after chemotherapy) and three (12%) locoregional relapse (one after tumorectomy and unknown margin without radiotherapy, two after mastectomy and involved margins with radiotherapy).Conclusion Wide breast surgery (that can be conservative in selected patients) is the mainstay of the treatment of non metastatic malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast. To better determine the respective roles of adjuvant systemic treatment and radiotherapy, further clinical studies and the search for new prognostic and predictive factors remain necessary.
    Article · Jul 2009 · Cancer/Radiothérapie
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This retrospective analysis was designed to confirm the predictive role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type I (PAI-1) in the outcome of early stage, node-negative breast cancer patients. Node-negative patients having not received adjuvant chemotherapy, and for whom frozen samples were available, were selected. Among the 169 patients included, 56.8% presented with uPA >3 ng/mg of proteins and/or PAI-1 >14 ng/mg of proteins. The median follow-up was 73 months. Significant correlations were found between uPA and disease-free survival (p [univariate]=0.003; p [multivariate]=0.01), and between uPA, PAI-1, and uPA plus PAI-1 and distant relapses (p=0.002). No significant correlation was found between uPA/PAI-1 and the risk of locoregional recurrence. This study demonstrated that uPA and PAI-1 are useful predictors of distant metastases in a subset of early stage, node-negative breast cancer patients.
    Article · Jun 2009 · Anticancer research
  • R.-J. Salmon
    Article · Jun 2009 · Imagerie de la Femme
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: To determine whether any histological trait was associated with regional and/or systemic spread of occult tumour cells (OTCs) in small size invasive breast cancer, we compared tumour characteristics, axillary sentinel lymph node (SN) and bone marrow (BM) status in a series of 287 pT1T2 cases. Surgery was the first step of treatment, associated with SN procedure and with BM aspiration for the detection of OTC. SN was histologically classified as negative, metastatic (>2mm), micro-metastatic (>0.2mm and 2mm) or involved by OTC detected by immunohistochemistry (Ni+, 0.2mm). BM specimens were analysed after immunocytochemistry and classified as negative or positive with atypical cytokeratin-positive OTC. Metastasis and micro-metastasis in the SN were correlated with size, grade and vascular invasion. In contrast, presence of OTC in both SN and BM was independent of these parameters but positively associated with lobular type. This correlation was also observed for BM status, which was similarly independent of the tumour characteristics. No association was found between SN status and BM status. Our data indicate that, in the course of breast cancer, OTC spreading is frequent and could be an early event, related to lobular histological type but independent of classical histoprognostic parameters, and that the loco-regional metastatic spread of OTC is not a prerequisite for systemic involvement.
    Article · Apr 2009 · European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990)
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Several gene expression signatures have been proposed and demonstrated to be predictive of outcome in breast cancer. In the present article we address the following issues: Do these signatures perform similarly? Are there (common) molecular processes reported by these signatures? Can better prognostic predictors be constructed based on these identified molecular processes? We performed a comprehensive analysis of the performance of nine gene expression signatures on seven different breast cancer datasets. To better characterize the functional processes associated with these signatures, we enlarged each signature by including all probes with a significant correlation to at least one of the genes in the original signature. The enrichment of functional groups was assessed using four ontology databases. The classification performance of the nine gene expression signatures is very similar in terms of assigning a sample to either a poor outcome group or a good outcome group. Nevertheless the concordance in classification at the sample level is low, with only 50% of the breast cancer samples classified in the same outcome group by all classifiers. The predictive accuracy decreases with the number of poor outcome assignments given to a sample. The best classification performance was obtained for the group of patients with only good outcome assignments. Enrichment analysis of the enlarged signatures revealed 11 functional modules with prognostic ability. The combination of the RNA-splicing and immune modules resulted in a classifier with high prognostic performance on an independent validation set. The study revealed that the nine signatures perform similarly but exhibit a large degree of discordance in prognostic group assignment. Functional analyses indicate that proliferation is a common cellular process, but that other functional categories are also enriched and show independent prognostic ability. We provide new evidence of the potentially promising prognostic impact of immunity and RNA-splicing processes in breast cancer.
    Full-text Article · Dec 2008 · Breast cancer research: BCR
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Circulating tumor cells in blood from metastatic breast cancer patients have been reported as a surrogate marker for tumor response and shorter survival. The aim of this study was to determine whether circulating tumor cells are present in the blood of patients with large operable or locally advanced breast cancer before neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery. Blood samples of 7.5 mL were obtained on CellSave tubes from patients included in a phase II trial (REMAGUS 02). Circulating tumor cells were immunomagnetically separated and fluorescently stained by the CellSearch system. Blood from 20 metastatic breast cancer patients was used as a positive control. From October 2004 to July 2006, preneoadjuvant chemotherapy and/or postneoadjuvant chemotherapy blood samples were obtained from 118 patients. At least 1 circulating tumor cell was detected in 22 of 97 patients with preneoadjuvant chemotherapy samples (23%; 95% confidence interval, 15-31%; median, 2 cells; range, 1-17 cells). Circulating tumor cell positivity rates were 17% in 86 postneoadjuvant chemotherapy samples and 27% in all 118 patients. Persistence of circulating tumor cells at the end of neoadjuvant chemotherapy was not correlated with treatment response. After a short median follow-up of 18 months, the presence of circulating tumor cells (P=0.017), hormone receptor negativity, and large tumor size were independent prognostic factors for shorter distant metastasis-free survival. Circulating tumor cells can be detected by the CellSearch system at a low cutoff of 1 cell in 27% of patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Circulating tumor cell detection was not correlated to the primary tumor response but is an independent prognostic factor for early relapse.
    Article · Dec 2008 · Clinical Cancer Research
  • Article · Nov 2008 · Cancer/Radiothérapie

Publication Stats

1k Citations

Institutions

  • 2006-2010
    • Institut Curie
      • Service de Radiothérapie
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France