H J Möller

Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, München, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (725)1653.78 Total impact

  • H.-P. Volz · S. Kasper · H.-J. Möller
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    ABSTRACT: Somatoform disorders are prevalent and can lead to profound diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. Whereas in DSM-IV-R and ICD-10 absence of somatic reason is a core criterion, this was changed in DSM-5. There, the diagnosis of this disorder is mainly based on the affective content of the somatic complaints. An unsolved issue is the therapy of these disorders. Besides cognitive-behavioral approaches, psychotropic agents have also been investigated regarding their efficacy and safety. However, there is no consensus, which instrument should be used to measure the main efficacy outcome criterion. In this paper the relevant studies using psychotropic compounds are first identified and characterized, then the double-blind, randomized studies are more thoroughly evaluated. Two instruments were mostly used to measure efficacy: the somatic subscore of the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the PHQ(Patient Health Questionnaire)-15. The advantages and disadvantages of both scales are described.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015
  • S. Kasper · W.E. Müller · M. Gastpar · H.-P. Volz · E. Seifritz · H.-J. Möller
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: We review clinical trials investigating the anxiolytic efficacy and tolerability of Silexan, an orally administered lavandula oil preparation, as well as its safety and potential for drug interactions. Methods: Seven trials were included. Five therapeutic trials had a treatment duration of 6 or 10 weeks. Results and Conclusions: In patients with subsyndromal anxiety the anxiolytic effect of Silexan was significantly superior to that of placebo after two weeks, and in generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) after four to six weeks. Patients treated with Silexan showed Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) total score decreases between 9.9 and 12.0 points at week 6 and between 12.8 and 16.0 points at week 10 (mean). In patients treated with Silexan HAMA total score reductions between baseline and end of treatment were comparable to lorazepam in its starting dose and Paroxetine in patients with GAD. Silexan had beneficial effects on typical related conditions of anxiety disorders, e. g. disturbed sleep, somatic complaints or decreased quality of life. Except from mild gastrointestinal symptoms the drug was devoid of specific adverse effects in these trials and did not cause drug interactions or withdrawal symptoms at daily doses of 80 or 160 mg. © 2015, Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft MBH. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Tobacco dependence is the most common substance use disorder in adults with mental illness. The prevalence rates for tobacco dependence are two to four times higher in these patients than in the general population. Smoking has a strong, negative influence on the life expectancy and quality of life of mental health patients, and remains the leading preventable cause of death in this group. Despite these statistics, in some countries smokers with mental illness are disadvantaged in receiving intervention and support for their tobacco dependence, which is often overlooked or even tolerated. This statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) systematically reviews the current evidence on tobacco dependence and withdrawal in patients with mental illness and their treatment. It provides seven recommendations for the core components of diagnostics and treatment in this patient group. These recommendations concern: (1) the recording process, (2) the timing of the intervention, (3) counselling specificities, (4) proposed treatments, (5) frequency of contact after stopping, (6) follow-up visits and (7) relapse prevention. They aim to help clinicians improve the care, health and well-being of patients suffering from mental illness.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · European Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Affective disorders are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, which, at least partly, appears to be independent of psychopharmacological treatments used to manage these disorders. Reduced heart rate variability (SDNN) and a low Omega-3 Index have been shown to be associated with increased risk for death after myocardial infarction. Therefore, we set out to investigate heart rate variability and the Omega-3 Index in euthymic patients with bipolar disorders. Methods: We assessed heart rate variability (SDNN) and the Omega-3 Index in 90 euthymic, mostly medicated patients with bipolar disorders (Bipolar-I, Bipolar-II) on stable psychotropic medication, free of significant medical comorbidity and in 62 healthy controls. Heart rate variability was measured from electrocardiography under a standardized 30 minutes resting state condition. Age, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption and caffeine consumption as potential confounders were also assessed. Results: Heart rate variability (SDNN) was significantly lower in patients with bipolar disorders compared to healthy controls (35.4 msec versus 60.7 msec; P<0.0001), whereas the Omega-3 Index did not differ significantly between the groups (5.2% versus 5.3%). In a linear regression model, only group membership (patients with bipolar disorders versus healthy controls) and age significantly predicted heart rate variability (SDNN). Conclusion: Heart rate variability (SDNN) may provide a useful tool to study the impact of interventions aimed at reducing the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in euthymic patients with bipolar disorders. The difference in SDNN between cases and controls cannot be explained by a difference in the Omega-3 Index.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · European Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Aim was to examine depressive symptoms in acutely ill schizophrenia patients on a single symptom basis and to evaluate their relationship with positive, negative and general psychopathological symptoms. Methods: Two hundred and seventy-eight patients suffering from a schizophrenia spectrum disorder were analysed within a naturalistic study by the German Research Network on Schizophrenia. Using the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) depressive symptoms were examined and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was applied to assess positive, negative and general symptoms. Correlation and factor analyses were calculated to detect the underlying structure and relationship of the patient's symptoms. Results: The most prevalent depressive symptoms identified were depressed mood (80%), observed depression (62%) and hopelessness (54%). Thirty-nine percent of the patients suffered from depressive symptoms when applying the recommended cut-off of a CDSS total score of >. 6 points at admission. Negligible correlations were found between depressive and positive symptoms as well as most PANSS negative and global symptoms despite items on depression, guilt and social withdrawal. The factor analysis revealed that the factor loading with the PANSS negative items accounted for most of the data variance followed by a factor with positive symptoms and three depression-associated factors. Limitations: The naturalistic study design does not allow a sufficient control of study results for the effect of different pharmacological treatments possibly influencing the appearance of depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Results suggest that depressive symptoms measured with the CDSS are a discrete symptom domain with only partial overlap with positive or negative symptoms.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · European Psychiatry
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    T Rüther · J Bobes · M De Hert · T.H. Svensson · K Mann · A Batra · P Gorwood · H.J. Möller
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    ABSTRACT: Tobacco dependence is the most common substance use disorder in adults with mental illness. The prevalence rates for tobacco dependence are two to four times higher in these patients than in the general population. Smoking has a strong, negative influence on the life expectancy and quality of life of mental health patients, and remains the leading preventable cause of death in this group. Despite these statistics, in some countries smokers with mental illness are disadvantaged in receiving intervention and support for their tobacco dependence, which is often overlooked or even tolerated. This statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) systematically reviews the current evidence on tobacco dependence and withdrawal in patients with mental illness and their treatment. It provides seven recommendations for the core components of diagnostics and treatment in this patient group. These recommendations concern: (1) the recording process, (2) the timing of the intervention, (3) counselling specificities, (4) proposed treatments, (5) frequency of contact after stopping, (6) follow-up visits and (7) relapse prevention. They aim to help clinicians improve the care, health and well-being of patients suffering from mental illness.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · European Psychiatry

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Der Nervenarzt
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    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: There is growing evidence of abnormalities of high-frequency oscillations in the gamma range of the electroencephalography in schizophrenia. The generation of neural activity in the gammaband was shown to be critically related to a glutamatergic and GABAergic microcircuit which is also known to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. One example of such gamma oscillations is the early auditory evoked gamma band response (aeGBR). We aimed to investigate whether there are altered aeGBR and activity of its sources in the anterior cingulate cortex and/or the auditory cortex (identified as sources of the GBR previously) in schizophrenic patients and in first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients. We investigated the early aeGBR and its sources (LORETA source localisation) in 90 medicated patients with schizophrenia and in 17 unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia using an auditory reaction task (comparison with age-, gender- and educational-level-matched control groups). Evoked power and phase locking of the aeGBR was reduced in schizophrenia patients and healthy first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia. This effect was due to a reduced activity in the auditory cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex. The findings are in line with the hypothesis of a disturbed GABAergic interneural modulation of pyramidal cells in schizophrenia and findings of different schizophrenia risk genes associated with transmission at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. The results regarding the first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia point to the applicability of this marker as a heritable intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2012 · European Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia published in 2005. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful and these guidelines are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F; Bandelow et al. 2008b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242). This first part of the updated guidelines covers the general descriptions of antipsychotics and their side effects, the biological treatment of acute schizophrenia and the management of treatment-resistant schizophrenia.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012 · The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry
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    W. Gaebel · H.-J. Möller

    Preview · Article · May 2012 · European Psychiatry
  • H.-J. Möller · G. Laux

    No preview · Article · May 2012
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    ABSTRACT: On the background of the growing evidence that the patient's functioning significantly influences the course and outcome of schizophrenia aims of this analysis were to examine what proportion of patients achieve functional outcome criteria after one year and to identify clinical and sociodemographic predictive factors for functional remission. Patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia who are treated as inpatients at the beginning of the study were examined within a naturalistic follow-up trial. The present study reports on the time frame from admission to discharge of an inpatient treatment period and the 1-year follow-up assessment. The Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) were evaluated with respect to functional outcome, whereas Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores were rated as psychopathological outcome measures. Functional remission thresholds were defined according to a GAF score of ≥61 points and a SOFAS score ≥61 points. Symptomatic remission criteria were applied according to the remission criteria of the Schizophrenia Working Group. The Strauss-Carpenter Prognostic Scale (SCPS), the Phillips Premorbid Adjustment Scale, medical history, sociodemographic and psychopathologic parameters were evaluated in order to find valuable predictors for functional remission. One year after discharge from inpatient treatment 211 out of 474 patients were available for analysis according to both functional remission considered rating-scales (GAF and SOFAS). Forty-seven percent of patients fulfilled criteria for functional remission (GAF and SOFAS) at discharge and 51% of patients at the one-year follow-up visit. With regard to symptomatic remission criteria corresponding remitter rates were 61% of patients at discharge and 54% at the one-year follow-up visit. Forty-two percent of patients fulfilled both remission criteria at discharge and 37% at the one-year follow-up visit. A significant association was found between functional and symptomatic remission at discharge and at the one-year follow-up visit (p<0.001). The strongest predictors for functional remission at the one-year follow-up visit were: a higher SCPS total score at admission, a lower number of previous hospitalizations, a status of employment, lower scores in all PANSS subscales at discharge, a better premorbid social adjustment, the occurrence of a first psychotic episode, a younger age, a lower PANSS negative subscore at admission, a status of being an early responder, a shorter duration of inpatient-treatment, a higher age of onset and female gender.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2012 · Psychiatry Research
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    ABSTRACT: Age has been reported to influence amplitude and latency of the P300 potential. Nevertheless, it is not yet fully understood which brain regions are responsible for these effects. The aim of this study was to investigate age-effects on the P300 potential and the simultaneously acquired BOLD signal of functional MRI. 32 healthy male subjects were investigated using an auditory oddball paradigm. The functional MRI data were acquired in temporal synchrony to the task. The evoked potential data were recorded during the intervals in between MR image acquisitions in order to reduce the influence of the scanner noise on the presentation of the tones and to reduce gradient artifacts. The age-effects were calculated by means of regression analyses. In addition, brain regions modulated by the task-induced amplitude variation of the P300 were identified (single trial analysis). The results indicated an age effect on the P300 amplitude. Younger subjects demonstrated increased parietal P300 amplitudes and increased BOLD responses in a network of brain regions including the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, the insula, the temporo-parietal junction, the superior temporal gyrus, the caudate body, the amygdala and the parahippocampal gyrus. Single trial coupling of EEG and fMRI indicated that P300 amplitudes were predominantly associated with neural responses in the anterior cingulate cortex, the putamen and temporal brain areas. Taken together, the results indicate diminished neural responses in older compared to younger subjects especially in frontal, temporo-parietal and subcortical brain regions.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · NeuroImage
  • R. Schennach · M. Riedel · F. Seemüller · S. Dehning · H.-J. Möller
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    ABSTRACT: Aim of this article is to provide an overview of criteria evaluating the clinical relevance of scientific research results. Statistically significant results of clinical studies are often biased by the sample size or variability of data. Therefore, it is important to validate the clinical relevance of such results. Exemplarily, using studies on escitalopram compared to other antidepressants, we will discuss different criteria (changes of mean differences of psychopathology rating scales, response, remission, number needed to treat) which can help clinicians to rank and critically discuss results of clinical studies as well as meta-analyses. Also in this context, pros and cons of single studies and meta-analyses will be discussed in order to provide tools helping clinicians to choose the best treatment available for the patient. For the treating clinician the consideration of response and remission bears greatest clinical relevance, in contrast, for statisticians the changes in mean differences offer greatest relevance and validity. From a scientific point of view, all of the here discussed criteria should be concurrently considered in order to reliably conclude on the clinical relevance of research results.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · European Psychiatry

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · European Psychiatry

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · European Psychiatry
  • I Giegling · A. M. Hartmann · B Schneider · K Maurer · H. J. Moeller · D Rujescu

    No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Pharmacopsychiatry

Publication Stats

9k Citations
1,653.78 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1995-2014
    • Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
      • • Department of Psychiatry
      • • Hospital and Clinic of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Poli
      • • Institute of Pathology
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2011
    • Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
      Göttingen, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 1986-2011
    • Technische Universität München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2007-2009
    • Universität Ulm
      • Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie III (Ulm)
      Ulm, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
    • University Hospital Frankfurt
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany
    • University of Leipzig
      Leipzig, Saxony, Germany
    • Technische Universität Dresden
      Dresden, Saxony, Germany
    • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
      Bochum, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      • Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
    • Bezirkskrankenhaus Augsburg
      Augsberg, Bavaria, Germany
    • Carl Gustav Carus-Institut
      Pforzheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2006-2007
    • Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
      • Faculty of Medicine
      Düsseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2005-2007
    • University of Hamburg
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
    • University of Pittsburgh
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    • ATOS Klinik Munich
      Münchenbernsdorf, Thuringia, Germany
  • 1992-2006
    • University of Bonn
      • • Klinik und Poliklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie
      • • Institute of Human Genetics
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2000-2005
    • Klinikum Stuttgart
      Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2004
    • Maastricht University
      • Department of Psychiatry & Neuropsychology
      Maestricht, Limburg, Netherlands
    • University of Gothenburg
      Goeteborg, Västra Götaland, Sweden
    • Universität Regensburg
      Ratisbon, Bavaria, Germany
    • Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
      Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • 1980-2003
    • Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1997-2002
    • University Hospital München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
    • University of Freiburg
      Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1999
    • Freie Universität Berlin
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Berlin, Land Berlin, Germany
    • University of Cologne
      • Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • National Institute on Aging
      • Laboratory of Neurosciences (LNS)
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 1981-1997
    • Deutsches Herzzentrum München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1996
    • Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena
      Jena, Thuringia, Germany
  • 1994
    • Sigmund-Freud-Institut
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany
  • 1992-1994
    • University of Bonn - Medical Center
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany