G. H. Sewell

University of Maine, Orono, MN, United States

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Publications (45)13.29 Total impact

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    Article: E55
    Gary H. Sewell · Andrei Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Nov 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Cultural practices such as organic amendments, rotations, and use of biological control organisms are regularly investigated for their effects on controlling plant diseases but their effects on soil microbial populations are often unexplored. In this study, three different sustainable disease management practices, use of compost amendment, biocontrol organisms, and a potentially disease-suppressive rotation, were established in potato field trials at two sites under different management regimes and histories, and evaluated over three potato cropping seasons for their effects on soil microbial communities. Specific management factors assessed included the presence or absence of a conifer-based compost amendment, addition of one of three different biocontrol organisms (Trichoderma virens, Bacillus subtilis, and Rhizoctonia solani isolate Rhs1A1), and a Brassica napus (rapeseed) green manure rotation crop preceding potato, and treatments were assessed in all factorial combinations. The two farm sites represented organic and conventional potato production practices in Aroostook County, Maine. Compost amendment and rapeseed rotation had the greatest impacts on soil microbial communities, with both treatments increasing total populations of culturable bacteria at both sites over the course of the study, as well as causing detectable shifts in soil microbial community characteristics as determined by sole carbon-source substrate utilization and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles. Compost amendment generally led to increased utilization of complex substrates and increased levels of Gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and compost effects were more pronounced at the conventional site. Rapeseed rotation often resulted in somewhat different effects at the two different sites. Consistent overall effects were observed with the biocontrol amendments Rhs1A1 and T. virens, including increased microbial activity and bacterial populations. Combined effects of multiple treatments were greater than those of individual treatments and were generally additive. These results indicate that each treatment factor had significant and specific effects on soil microbial communities, and that combined effects tended to be complementary, suggesting the potential of combining multiple compatible management practices and their associated changes in soil microbial communities.Highlights► We examined soil amendments at sites with different management histories. ► Rapeseed, compost and biocontrol amendments shifted microbial community structures. ► Compost amendment had more pronounced effects on soils with low organic matter. ► Rapeseed rotation changed microbial populations in soils with more organic matter. ► In combination, compost, rapeseed, and biocontrol treatment effects were additive.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · Applied Soil Ecology
  • Andrei Alyokhin · Gary Sewell

    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2011
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    Article: E62
    Gary H. Sewell · Andrei Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Oct 2011
  • Article: E63
    Gary H. Sewell · Andrei Alyokhin

    No preview · Article · Oct 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Study of mechanisms responsible for regulating populations of living organisms is essential for a better comprehension of the structure of biological communities and evolutionary forces in nature. Aphids (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha) comprise a large and economically important group of phytophagous insects distributed worldwide. Previous studies determined that density-dependent mechanisms play an important role in regulating their populations. However, only a few of those studies identified specific factors responsible for the observed regulation. Time series data used in this study originated from the untreated control plots that were a part of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) insecticide trials in northern Maine from 1971 to 2004. The data set contained information on population densities of three potato-colonizing aphid species (buckthorn aphid, Aphis nasturtii; potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae; and green peach aphid, Myzus persicae) and their natural enemies. We used path analysis to explore effects of weather and natural enemies on the intrinsic growth rates of aphid populations. Weather factors considered in our analyses contributed to the regulation of aphid populations, either directly or through natural enemies. However, direct weather effects were in most cases detectable only at P ≤ 0.10. Potato aphids were negatively affected by both fungal disease and predators, although buckthorn aphids were negatively affected by predators only. Parasitoids did not have a noticeable effect on the growth of any of the three aphid species. Growth of green peach aphid populations was negatively influenced by interspecific interactions with the other two aphid species. Differential population regulation mechanisms detected in the current study might at least partially explain coexistence of three ecologically similar aphid species sharing the same host plant.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2011 · Environmental Entomology
  • Article: E18
    Gary H. Sewell · Andrei Alyokhin

    No preview · Article · Sep 2010
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    Article: E19
    Gary H. Sewell · Andrei Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Sep 2010
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    Article: (E51)
    Gary H. Sewell · Andrei Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Sep 2009
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    Article: (E52)
    Gary H. Sewell · Andrei Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Sep 2009
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    G. H. Sewell · A. Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Jan 2008
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    G. H. Sewell · A. Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Jan 2008
  • Andrei Alyokhin · Gary Sewell · Raymond Choban
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    ABSTRACT: Novaluron is a benzoylphenyl urea chitin synthesis inhibitor that combines good activity against larval stages of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), with low mammalian toxicity. Previous studies suggest that it has deleterious sublethal effects on adults. Continuous exposure of adult Colorado potato beetles to novaluron-treated foliage as both ovipositional and feeding substrate did not affect their survivorship or the number of eggs produced, but viable larvae hatched only from the eggs that were laid on the first day of the experiment. Viability was restored after adult beetles spent 48-96 hours on untreated leaves. In a separate experiment, direct exposure to novaluron of eggs laid by unexposed beetles also reduced the number of larvae hatching. Results confirm a negative effect of novaluron on the number of progeny produced by the Colorado potato beetle. Direct toxicity did not explain all of the reduction in egg hatch observed, suggesting that novaluron probably acted on reproductive adults as well as on eggs after they were deposited.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2008 · Pest Management Science
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    G. H. Sewell · A. Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Jan 2007
  • G. H. Sewell · A. Alyokhin

    No preview · Article · Jan 2007
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    G. H. Sewell · A. Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Jan 2007
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    G. H. Sewell · A. Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Jan 2006
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    G. H. Sewell · A. Andrei

    Preview · Article · Jan 2006
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    G. H. Sewell · A. Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Jan 2006
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    G. H. Sewell · A. Alyokhin

    Preview · Article · Jan 2006

Publication Stats

189 Citations
13.29 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002-2012
    • University of Maine
      • School of Biology and Ecology
      Orono, MN, United States
  • 2011
    • University of Maine at Presque Isle
      Presque Isle, Maine, United States