Berk Hess

KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden

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Publications (59)187.71 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Long-range lattice summation techniques such as the particle-mesh Ewald (PME) algorithm for electrostatics have been revolutionary to the precision and accuracy of molecular simulations in general. Despite the performance penalty associated with lattice summation electrostatics, few biomolecular simulations today are performed without it. There are increasingly strong arguments for moving in the same direction for Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions, and by using geometric approximations of the combination rules in reciprocal space, we have been able to make a very high-performance implementation available in GROMACS. Here, we present a new way to correct for these approximations to achieve exact treatment of Lorentz-Berthelot combination rules within the cutoff, and only a very small approximation error remains outside the cutoff (a part that would be completely ignored without LJ-PME). This not only improves accuracy by almost an order of magnitude but also achieves absolute biomolecular simulation performance that is an order of magnitude faster than any other available lattice summation technique for LJ interactions. The implementation includes both CPU and GPU acceleration, and its combination with improved scaling LJ-PME simulations now provides performance close to the truncated potential methods in GROMACS but with much higher accuracy.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation
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    ABSTRACT: GROMACS is one of the most widely used open-source and free software codes in chemistry, used primarily for dynamical simulations of biomolecules. It provides a rich set of calculation types, preparation and analysis tools. Several advanced techniques for free-energy calculations are supported. In version 5, it reaches new performance heights, through several new and enhanced parallelization algorithms. These work on every level; SIMD registers inside cores, multithreading, heterogeneous CPU-GPU acceleration, state-of-the-art 3D domain decomposition, and ensemble-level parallelization through built-in replica exchange and the separate Copernicus framework. The latest best-in-class compressed trajectory storage format is supported.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2015
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    ABSTRACT: GROMACS is a widely used package for biomolecular simulation, and over the last two decades it has evolved from small-scale efficiency to advanced heterogeneous acceleration and multi-level parallelism targeting some of the largest supercomputers in the world. Here, we describe some of the ways we have been able to realize this through the use of parallelization on all levels, combined with a constant focus on absolute performance. Release 4.6 of GROMACS uses SIMD acceleration on a wide range of architectures, GPU offloading acceleration, and both OpenMP and MPI parallelism within and between nodes, respectively. The recent work on acceleration made it necessary to revisit the fundamental algorithms of molecular simulation, including the concept of neighborsearching, and we discuss the present and future challenges we see for exascale simulation - in particular a very fine-grained task parallelism. We also discuss the software management, code peer review and continuous integration testing required for a project of this complexity.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015
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    ABSTRACT: GROMACS (GROningen MAchine for Chemical Simulations) is a molecular dynamics package primarily designed for simulations of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. It was originally developed in the Biophysical Chemistry department of University of Groningen, and is now maintained by contributors in universities and research centers across the world.
    Full-text · Book · Oct 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Here we report on the performance of GROMACS 4.6 on the SuperMUC cluster at the Leibniz Rechenzentrum in Garching. We carried out benchmarks with three biomolecular systems consisting of eighty thousand to twelve million atoms in a strong scaling test each. The twelve million atom simulation system reached a performance of 49 nanoseconds per day on 32,768 cores.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Advances in Parallel Computing
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    ABSTRACT: The accuracy of electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics advanced tremendously with the introduction of particle-mesh Ewald (PME) summation almost 20 years ago. Lattice summation electrostatics is now the de facto standard for most types of biomolecular simulations, and in particular, for lipid bilayers, it has been a critical improvement due to the large charges typically present in zwitterionic lipid headgroups. In contrast, Lennard-Jones interactions have continued to be handled with increasingly longer cutoffs, partly because few alternatives have been available despite significant difficulties in tuning cutoffs and parameters to reproduce lipid properties. Here, we present a new Lennard-Jones PME implementation applied to lipid bilayers. We confirm that long-range contributions are well approximated by dispersion corrections in simple systems such as pentadecane (which makes parameters transferable), but for inhomogeneous and anisotropic systems such as lipid bilayers there are large effects on surface tension, resulting in up to 5.5% deviations in area per lipid and order parameters—far larger than many differences for which reparameterization has been attempted. We further propose an approximation for combination rules in reciprocal space that significantly reduces the computational cost of Lennard-Jones PME and makes accurate treatment of all nonbonded interactions competitive with simulations employing long cutoffs. These results could potentially have broad impact on important applications such as membrane proteins and free energy calculations.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation
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    Szilárd Páll · Berk Hess
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    ABSTRACT: Calculating interactions or correlations between pairs of particles is typically the most time-consuming task in particle simulation or correlation analysis. Straightforward implementations using a double loop over particle pairs have traditionally worked well, especially since compilers usually do a good job of unrolling the inner loop. In order to reach high performance on modern CPU and accelerator architectures, single-instruction multiple-data (SIMD) parallelization has become essential. Avoiding memory bottlenecks is also increasingly important and requires reducing the ratio of memory to arithmetic operations. Moreover, when pairs only interact within a certain cut-off distance, good SIMD utilization can only be achieved by reordering input and output data, which quickly becomes a limiting factor. Here we present an algorithm for SIMD parallelization based on grouping a fixed number of particles, e.g. 2, 4, or 8, into spatial clusters. Calculating all interactions between particles in a pair of such clusters improves data reuse compared to the traditional scheme and results in a more efficient SIMD parallelization. Adjusting the cluster size allows the algorithm to map to SIMD units of various widths. This flexibility not only enables fast and efficient implementation on current CPUs and accelerator architectures like GPUs or Intel MIC, but it also makes the algorithm future-proof. We present the algorithm with an application to molecular dynamics simulations, where we can also make use of the effective buffering the method introduces.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Computer Physics Communications
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    ABSTRACT: The training event includes tutorials on basic and advanced usage of two major packages for Molecular Dynamics simulations – GROMACS and AMBER – with focus on their application to modelling of biomolecular systems. The following sessions will include the presentation of two portals for automated submission of jobs developed by the WeNMR (wenmr.eu) and ScalaLife (scalalife.eu).
    No preview · Conference Paper · Apr 2013
  • Article: GROMACS 4.5
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    ABSTRACT: Motivation: Molecular simulation has historically been a low-throughput technique, but faster computers and increasing amounts of genomic and structural data are changing this by enabling large-scale automated simulation of, for instance, many conformers or mutants of biomolecules with or without a range of ligands. At the same time, advances in performance and scaling now make it possible to model complex biomolecular interaction and function in a manner directly testable by experiment. These applications share a need for fast and efficient software that can be deployed on massive scale in clusters, web servers, distributed computing or cloud resources. Results: Here, we present a range of new simulation algorithms and features developed during the past 4 years, leading up to the GROMACS 4.5 software package. The software now automatically handles wide classes of biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, and comes with all commonly used force fields for these molecules built-in. GROMACS supports several implicit solvent models, as well as new free-energy algorithms, and the software now uses multithreading for efficient parallelization even on low-end systems, including windows-based workstations. Together with hand-tuned assembly kernels and state-of-the-art parallelization, this provides extremely high performance and cost efficiency for high-throughput as well as massively parallel simulations. Availability: GROMACS is an open source and free software available from http://www.gromacs.org. Contact: erik.lindahl@scilifelab.se Supplementary information:Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Bioinformatics
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    ABSTRACT: The ScalaLife project (Scalable Software Services for Life Science) started in September 2010 and develops new hierarchical parallelization approaches explicitly based on ensemble and high-throughput computing for new multi-core and streaming/GPU architectures, establishes open software standards for data storage and exchange. The project implements, documents, and maintains such techniques in pilot European open-source codes such as the widely used GROMACS & DALTON, as well as a new application for ensemble simulation (DISCRETE). ScalaLife created a Competence Centre for scalable life science software to strengthen Europe as a major software provider and to enable the community to exploit e-Infrastructures to their full extent. This Competence Network provides training and support infrastructure, and establishes a long-term framework for maintenance and optimization of life science codes.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Motivation: Molecular simulation has historically been a low-throughput technique, but faster computers and increasing amounts of genomic and structural data are changing this by enabling large-scale automated simulation of, for instance, many conformers or mutants of biomolecules with or without a range of ligands. At the same time, advances in performance and scaling now make it possible to model complex biomolecular interaction and function in a manner directly testable by experiment. These applications share a need for fast and efficient software that can be deployed on massive scale in clusters, web servers, distributed computing or cloud resources. Results: Here, we present a range of new simulation algorithms and features developed during the past 4 years, leading up to the GROMACS 4.5 software package. The software now automatically handles wide classes of biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, and comes with all commonly used force fields for these molecules built-in. GROMACS supports several implicit solvent models, as well as new free-energy algorithms, and the software now uses multithreading for efficient parallelization even on low-end systems, including windows-based workstations. Together with hand-tuned assembly kernels and state-of-the-art parallelization, this provides extremely high performance and cost efficiency for high-throughput as well as massively parallel simulations. Availability: GROMACS is an open source and free software available from http://www.gromacs.org. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · Bioinformatics
  • Peter M Kasson · Berk Hess · Erik Lindahl
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    ABSTRACT: Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Chemistry and Physics of Lipids
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    Full-text · Book · Jan 2013
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    ABSTRACT: The Life Sciences have rapidly become one of the major beneficiaries of the European e-Infrastructures, placing a growing demand on the capabilities of simulation software and on the support services. The ScalaLife project has set to address some of the specific problems associated with this growth, acting along two distinct and complementary directions. On the one hand, the project is concerned with the discrepancy between the scalability advances made by e-Infrastructure projects such as PRACE/DEISA on large molecular systems and the reality of the typical Life Science simulation, which works predominantly with small-to-medium systems. Thus, ScalaLife is implementing new techniques for efficient small-to-medium system parallelisation, developing new hierarchical approaches (explicitly based on ensemble and high-throughput computing for new multi-core and streaming/GPU architectures) and establishing open software standards for data storage and exchange. On the other hand, the project is committed to the long-term support of the Life Science users and communities, providing both training and expert advice. First, ScalaLife is documenting and developing training material for the new techniques and data storage formats implemented by the project. Second, the project has created a prototype for a cross-disciplinary Competence Centre, which enables the Life Science community to exploit the key European applications developed as part of the project as well as the existing European e-Infrastructures effectively. By providing a training and support infrastructure and by developing a centre of excellence and associated policies to foster collaboration, the Competence Centre establishes a long-term structure for the maintenance and optimisation of Life Science software.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Oct 2012
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    ABSTRACT: The gating of voltage-gated ion channels is controlled by the arginine-rich S4 helix of the voltage-sensor domain moving in response to an external potential. Recent studies have suggested that S4 moves in three to four steps to open the conducting pore, thus visiting several intermediate conformations during gating. However, the exact conformational changes are not known in detail. For instance, it has been suggested that there is a local rotation in the helix corresponding to short segments of a 3[Formula: see text]-helix moving along S4 during opening and closing. Here, we have explored the energetics of the transition between the fully open state (based on the X-ray structure) and the first intermediate state towards channel closing (C[Formula: see text]), modeled from experimental constraints. We show that conformations within 3 Å of the X-ray structure are obtained in simulations starting from the C[Formula: see text] model, and directly observe the previously suggested sliding 3[Formula: see text]-helix region in S4. Through systematic free energy calculations, we show that the C[Formula: see text] state is a stable intermediate conformation and determine free energy profiles for moving between the states without constraints. Mutations indicate several residues in a narrow hydrophobic band in the voltage sensor contribute to the barrier between the open and C[Formula: see text] states, with F233 in the S2 helix having the largest influence. Substitution for smaller amino acids reduces the transition cost, while introduction of a larger ring increases it, largely confirming experimental activation shift results. There is a systematic correlation between the local aromatic ring rotation, the arginine barrier crossing, and the corresponding relative free energy. In particular, it appears to be more advantageous for the F233 side chain to rotate towards the extracellular side when arginines cross the hydrophobic region.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The work aims at evaluating the performance of GROMACS on different platforms and and determine the optimal set of conditions for given architectures for petascaling molecular dynamics simulations. The activities have been organized into three tasks within PRACE project: (i) Optimization of GROMACS performance on Blue Gene systems; (ii) Parallel scaling of the OpenMP implementation; (iii) Development of a multiple step-size symplectic integrator adapted to the large biomolecule systems. Part of the results reported here has been achieved through the collaboration with ScalaLife project.
    Full-text · Technical Report · Feb 2012
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Biophysical Journal
  • David van der Spoel · Berk Hess
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    ABSTRACT: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations form a powerful tool that is complementary to experiments and theory. They allow detailed investigations of both biological and chemical systems at the atomic level at timescales ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds. Mechanisms and processes not accessible to experimental techniques can be followed in ‘real time’, and hypotheses based on experiments or theoretical arguments can be tested. Limits on the accuracy of results are mainly due to the physical models, the ratio of the complexity of the problem and the amount of computer time. Here, we review the state of the art in MD simulations with a focus on imminent challenges for the GROMACS (GROningen MAchine for Chemical Simulation) software. New hardware puts new requirements on software, while the breadth of applications and the amount of physical models implemented are increasing rapidly, highlighting shortcomings in the architecture of the programs. We sketch a road map for a popular scientific software package and discuss some of the choices to be made. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2011 1 710–715 DOI: 10.1002/wcms.50
    No preview · Article · Apr 2011
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    ABSTRACT: The activation of voltage-gated ion channels is controlled by the S4 helix, with arginines every third residue. The x-ray structures are believed to reflect an open-inactivated state, and models propose combinations of translation, rotation, and tilt to reach the resting state. Recently, experiments and simulations have independently observed occurrence of 3(10)-helix in S4. This suggests S4 might make a transition from α- to 3(10)-helix in the gating process. Here, we show 3(10)-helix structure between Q1 and R3 in the S4 segment of a voltage sensor appears to facilitate the early stage of the motion toward a down state. We use multiple microsecond-steered molecular simulations to calculate the work required for translating S4 both as α-helix and transformed to 3(10)-helix. The barrier appears to be caused by salt-bridge reformation simultaneous to R4 passing the F233 hydrophobic lock, and it is almost a factor-two lower with 3(10)-helix. The latter facilitates translation because R2/R3 line up to face E183/E226, which reduces the requirement to rotate S4. This is also reflected in a lower root mean-square deviation distortion of the rest of the voltage sensor. This supports the 3(10) hypothesis, and could explain some of the differences between the open-inactivated- versus activated-states.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Biophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We performed molecular simulations to study ion pairing in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that ion specific interactions of Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) with the dimethyl phosphate anion are solvent-mediated. The same mechanism applies to carboxylate ions, as has been illustrated in earlier simulations of aqueous alkali acetate solutions. Contact ion pairs play only a minor role--or no role at all--in determining the solution structure and ion specific thermodynamics of these systems. On the basis of the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solution we furthermore show that the well-known reversal of the Hofmeister series of salt activity coefficients, comparing chloride or bromide with dimethyl phosphate or acetate, is caused by changing from a contact pairing mechanism in the former system to a solvent-mediated interaction mechanism in the latter system.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2011 · The Journal of Physical Chemistry B

Publication Stats

17k Citations
187.71 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011-2015
    • KTH Royal Institute of Technology
      • Department of Theoretical Physics
      Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 2009-2011
    • Stockholm University
      • Center for Biomembrane Research
      Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 2005-2010
    • Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research
      Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • 1998-2005
    • University of Groningen
      • • Department of Applied Physics
      • • Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (GBB)
      Groningen, Province of Groningen, Netherlands