Katarzyna Strzelec

University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lyublin, Lublin Voivodeship, Poland

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Publications (7)4.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Both physical activity and stress result in an increase in plasma cortisol level. The measurement of cortisol in plasma requires taking blood samples, which is stressful itself. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the use of saliva sampling for the determination of cortisol concentrations, indicating the intensity of exercise in horses during race training. Twelve Thoroughbred horses aged 2-3 years were examined during their speed training sessions. The horses galloped on the 1,200-m sand track at a speed of 14.4-15.3 m/s. Three saliva samples and three blood samples were collected from each horse. Both types of samples were taken when the horse was at rest, immediately after returning from the track and 30 minutes after the end of exercise. Blood lactic acid (LA) concentration was determined using the enzymatic cuvette test. The concentrations of cortisol in saliva and plasma samples were measured by enzyme immunoassay methods. Statistically significant correlations were found between salivary cortisol level determined 30 minutes after the end of exercise and blood LA concentration obtained immediately after exercise (P = .003) and between salivary and plasma cortisol levels measured 30 minutes after the end of training session (P = .015). The measurement of cortisol concentration in saliva samples taken from race horses 30 minutes after the end of exercise can be recommended for use in practice under field conditions to estimate the level of relative intensity of exercise in race horses.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Journal of Equine Veterinary Science
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    ABSTRACT: Physical activity and stress both cause an increase in cortisol release ratio. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of saliva samples for the determination of cortisol concentrations indicating the work-load level in horses during race training. Twelve Purebred Arabian horses aged 3-5 years were studied during the routine training session. After the warm-up, the horses galloped on the 800 m sand track at a speed of 12.8 m/s. Three saliva samples, and three blood samples were collected from each horse. Both types of samples were taken at rest, immediately after return from the track and after 30 min restitution. The concentrations of blood lactic acid (LA), and cortisol in saliva and plasma samples were measured and analyzed. Blood LA, plasma and salivary cortisol levels increased significantly after exercise (P < 0.05). Salivary cortisol concentration determined 30 min after the exercise correlated significantly with plasma cortisol level obtained immediately after exercise (P < 0.05) as well as measured 30 min after the end of exercise (P < 0.05). The determination of cortisol concentration in saliva samples taken from racehorses 30 min after the end of exercise can be recommended to use in field conditions to estimate the work-load in racehorses.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Animal Science Journal
  • I Janczarek · A Bereznowski · K Strzelec
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to define the influence of the selected factors (gender, age, transportation time, riding distance and air temperature during the ride) on the cortisol secretion and finding a correlation between the hormone level and the horses' sport results (veterinary parameters and the ride route parameters). The research was performed on 38 Arabian pure breed horses taking part in the endurance rides. The cortisol level was measured with enzyme-immunological method in saliva samples, taken four times from each horse. In order to verify the differences between the mean results the repeated measures design was applied. The significance of the differences between the mean values was determined by the Tukey test. To evaluate the interrelations between the analysed attributes Pearson's correlation analysis was applied. The cortisol level at rest was not affected by any of the analysed factors. In case of other results, the most significant influence (P < or = 0.05) was related to the gender, as well as the ride distance and air temperature during the ride. Higher cortisol level was noted in mares, horses running the longest distances and at the highest temperatures. A significant increase in the cortisol level was noted when the ride distance was longer. There were no clear correlation between the adrenal cortex activity and the veterinary parameters at different riding speed. High cortisol concentration can negatively affect the heart rate (HR) by increasing it, but it can simultaneously stimulate the body to fight dehydration.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Polish journal of veterinary sciences
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    ABSTRACT: The group of 36 warm-blooded half-bred horses (18 stallions and 18 mares) and their riders (20 men and 16 women), who ended three-day-events, were selected for the study. The horses were aged 4 to 6 years, while the riders were 19 to 34-year-old. The saliva samples were collected after each phase of the competitions. The cortisol concentration was determined using an immunoassay method. The following factors were considered: type of competition, horse sex, and rider gender. In horses, the statistically important correlation was found between the results obtained for the dressage and cross-country, for the cross-country and show jumping, and for the dressage and show jumping. An analogous comparison for the riders suggests a statistically significant correlation between the data obtained for the cross-country and show jumping. Comparing the data of horses and their riders, a significant correlation coefficient was found for the cross-country group of woman and the dressage group of men. In conclusion, the salivary cortisol level in individual horses in each phase of three-day-event was found to be repetitive. Therefore, the salivary cortisol test is demonstrated to be a useful method to evaluate the horse response to each type of competition during three-day-events.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Bulletin- Veterinary Institute in Pulawy
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    ABSTRACT: Intensive exercise and exertion during competition promote many changes that may result in the impairment of immunity and increased susceptibility to infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of "the first line of defense": neutrophils and monocytes in racing Thoroughbred and Arabian horses after routine training sessions. Twenty-three (12 Thoroughbred and 11 Arabian) horses were examined. Routine haematological (number of red blood cells - RBC, haemoglobin concentration - HGB, haematocrit - HCT, total number of white blood cells - WBC), biochemical (creatine phosphokinase activity - CPK and total protein concentration - TP) parameters, cortisol concentration as well as phagocytic and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils and monocytes were determined. The values of basic parameters and the activity of phagocytes differed between breeds and distinct patterns of exercise-induced changes were observed. The training sessions did not produce the decrease in phagocyte activity that might lead to the suppression of immunity.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · Research in Veterinary Science
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    Katarzyna Strzelec · Marta Kankofer · Sławomir Pietrzak
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to characterize the stress level in sport horses subjected to exercise by measuring the cortisol concentration in their saliva. The experiment was conducted on 5 groups of horses (49 animals): one control and four groups undergoing different types of exercises. The saliva samples were collected 3 x a day: late at night (between 20:00 and 23:00 h), early in the morning (between 5:00 and 8:00 h) and directly after the exercise. The concentration of cortisol was measured by the enzyme-immunoassay programme. The highest cortisol concentration was observed for the horses participating in 3-day events (8.93 nmol/dm(3)), whereas in the control group it was only 0.28 nmol/dm(3). When compared to the cortisol concentration of other horse groups, this suggests that the stress level as measured by the cortisol concentration in saliva increases with increasing exercise intensity and its duration. The obtained results do not confirm the existence of a day rhythm of the cortisol concentration in horses. Moreover, the results may help in choosing the appropriate system of training and in improving horse welfare during competitions.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2011 · Acta Veterinaria Brno
  • Krzysztof Bocian · Katarzyna Strzelec · Patrycja Dziubińska

    No preview · Article · Jan 2011