Remco M. Dijkman

Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven, North Brabant, Netherlands

Are you Remco M. Dijkman?

Claim your profile

Publications (89)35.26 Total impact

  • R.M. Dijkman · B. Sprenkels · T. Peeters · A. Janssen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Internet of Things is the connection - via the internet - of objects from the physical world that are equipped with sensors, actuators and communication technology. This technology is looked at by a large variety of domains, such as manufacturing, healthcare and energy, to facilitate the development of new applications and the improvement of existing applications. To also enable the commercial exploitation of these applications, new types of business models must be developed. Frameworks exist to facilitate the development of business models. These frameworks define the building blocks that a business model address. This paper presents a business model framework specifically for Internet of Things applications. Through a literature survey, interviews and a survey among practitioners, it identifies the building blocks that are relevant in an Internet of Things business model, types of options that can be focused on within these building blocks and the relative importance of these building blocks and types. The framework can be used by developers as a starting point for creating business models for Internet of Things applications.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International Journal of Information Management
  • Zhiqiang Yan · Remco Dijkman · Paul Grefen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Business process management plays an important role in the management of organizations. More and more organizations describe their operations as business processes. It is common for organizations to have collections of thousands of business processes, but for reasons of confidentiality these collections are often not, or only partially, available to researchers. On the other hand, research on techniques for managing process model collections, such as techniques for process retrieval, requires large collections for evaluation purposes. Therefore, this paper proposes a technique to generate such collections of process models, based on the properties of real-world collections. Where existing techniques focus on the structure of the process models, the technique proposed in this paper also generates task labels that consists of words from real-life task labels and considers semantic information of node and edge types. We evaluate our technique by applying it to generate two synthetic collections of process models of over 60,000 and over 2,000 models, respectively. We show that the generated synthetic collections have similar properties to the original collections. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first technique that can generate synthetic BPMN models, thus enabling experimentation with process collections that have laboratory-set quantitative parameters and qualitative properties that are based on real-world process model collections.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Software and Systems Modeling
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Business process standardization is the activity of unifying different variants of a family of business processes. While the positive effects of business process standardization are well-described, it is often undesirable to fully unify different variants due to cultural, legal, or operational reasons. Consequently, a decision has to be made about the extent to which a family of business processes should be standardized. However, little is known about the factors that drive that decision. This paper fills that gap, by presenting factors that drive the extent to which business processes can be standardized, performance properties that are influenced by business process standardization, and relations between these concepts.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Context Many large organizations juggle an application portfolio that contains different applications that fulfill similar tasks in the organization. In an effort to reduce operating costs, they are attempting to consolidate such applications. Before consolidating applications, the work that is done with these applications must be harmonized. This is also known as process harmonization. Objective The increased interest in process harmonization calls for measures to quantify the extent to which processes have been harmonized. These measures should also uncover the factors that are of interest when harmonizing processes. Currently, such measures do not exist. Therefore, this study develops and validates a measurement model to quantify the level of process harmonization in an organization. Method The measurement model was developed by means of a literature study and structured interviews. Subsequently, it was validated through a survey, using factor analysis and correlations with known related constructs. Results As a result, a valid and reliable measurement model was developed. The factors that are found to constitute process harmonization are: the technical design of the business process and its data, the resources that execute the process, and the information systems that are used in the process. In addition, strong correlations were found between process harmonization and process standardization and between process complexity and process harmonization. Conclusion The measurement model can be used by practitioners, because it shows them the factors that must be taken into account when harmonizing processes, and because it provides them with a means to quantify the extent to which they succeeded in harmonizing their processes. At the same time, it can be used by researchers to conduct further empirical research in the area of process harmonization.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Information and Software Technology
  • Source
    Remco Dijkman · Sander Vincent Lammers · Ad de Jong
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BPM maturity is a measure to evaluate how professionally an organization manages its business processes. Previous research provides evidence that higher BPM maturity leads to better performance of processes and of the organization as a whole. It also claims that different organizations should strive for different levels of maturity, depending on their properties. This paper presents an empirical investigation of these claims, based on a sample of 120 organizations and looking at a selection of organizational properties. Our results reveal that higher BPM maturity contributes to better performance, but only up to a point. Interestingly, it contradicts the popular belief that higher innovativeness is associated with lower BPM maturity, rather showing that higher innovativeness is associated with higher BPM maturity. In addition, the paper shows that companies in different regions have a different level of BPM maturity. These findings can be used as a benchmark and a motivation for organizations to increase their BPM maturity.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Information Systems Frontiers
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper studies the relation between activity on Twitter and sales. While research exists into the relation between Tweets and movie and book sales, this paper shows that the same relations do not hold for products that receive less attention on social media. For such products, classification of Tweets is far more important to determine a relation. Also, for such products advanced statistical relations, in addition to correlation, are required to relate Twitter activity and sales. In a case study that involves Tweets and sales from a company in four countries, the paper shows how, by classifying Tweets, such relations can be identified. In particular, the paper shows evidence that positive Tweets by persons (as opposed to companies) can be used to forecast sales and that peaks in positive Tweets by persons are strongly related to an increase in sales. These results can be used to improve sales forecasts and to increase sales in marketing campaigns.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
  • Remco Dijkman · Irene Vanderfeesten · Hajo A. Reijers
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With the uptake of business process modelling in practice, the demand grows for guidelines that lead to consistent and integrated collections of process models. The notion of a business process architecture has been explicitly proposed to address this. This paper provides an overview of the prevailing approaches to design a business process architecture. Furthermore, it includes evaluations of the usability and use of the identified approaches. Finally, it presents a framework for business process architecture design that can be used to develop a concrete architecture. The use and usability were evaluated in two ways. First, a survey was conducted among 39 practitioners, in which the opinion of the practitioners on the use and usefulness of the approaches was evaluated. Second, four case studies were conducted, in which process architectures from practice were analysed to determine the approaches or elements of approaches that were used in their design. Both evaluations showed that practitioners have a preference for using approaches that are based on reference models and approaches that are based on the identification of business functions or business objects. At the same time, the evaluations showed that practitioners use these approaches in combination, rather than selecting a single approach.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Enterprise Information Systems
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Process model matching refers to the creation of correspondences between activities of process models. Applications of process model matching are manifold, reaching from model validation over harmonization of process variants to effective management of process model collections. Recently, this demand led to the development of different techniques for process model matching. Yet, these techniques are heuristics and, thus, their results are inherently uncertain and need to be evaluated on a common basis. Currently, however, the BPM community lacks established data sets and frameworks for evaluation. The Process Model Matching Contest 2013 aimed at addressing the need for effective evaluation by defining process model matching problems over published data sets. This paper summarizes the setup and the results of the contest. Besides a description of the contest matching problems, the paper comprises short descriptions of all matching techniques that have been submitted for participation. In addition, we present and discuss the evaluation results and outline directions for future work in this field of research
    No preview · Chapter · Jan 2014
  • Source
    Akhil Kumar · Remco Dijkman · Minseok Song
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A workflow is a team process since many actors work on various tasks to complete an instance. Resource management in such workflows deals with assignment of tasks to workers or actors. In team formation, it is necessary to ensure that members of a team are compatible with each other. When a workflow instance of, say, an insurance claim (or a surgery) process is performed, the handoffs between successive tasks are often soft as opposed to hard, and actors who perform successive tasks in this process instance must cooperate. If they cooperate well, it can improve quality and increase throughput of the instance. In general, the degree of required cooperation between a pair of tasks varies and this should be captured by a model. This paper develops a model to capture the compatibility between actors while assigning tasks in a workflow to a group of actors. The model is tested through a simulation and the results from a greedy algorithm are compared with optimal results. A technique for computing the compatibility matrix is given and used for an empirical validation from a real execution log. We argue that workflow resource models should recognize soft handoffs and provide support for them.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Aug 2013
  • Source
    Monika Malinova · Remco Dijkman · Jan Mendling
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many organizations build up their business process management activities in an incremental way. As a result, there is no overarching structure defined at the beginning. However, as business In this paper, we introduce a technique for automatically extracting process categories from process model collections and test it using a collection from industry. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the technique by revealing issues of the pre-existing process categories. In this way, we contribute to the field of process model management and quality assurance.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Aug 2013
  • Paul W. P. J. Grefen · Remco M. Dijkman

    No preview · Article · Jun 2013
  • Source
    Pieter Van Gorp · Remco Dijkman
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ContextThe Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) standard informally defines a precise execution semantics. It defines how process instances should be updated in a model during execution. Existing formalizations of the standard are incomplete and rely on mappings to other languages.Objective This paper provides a BPMN 2.0 semantics formalization that is more complete and intuitive than existing formalizations.Method The formalization consists of in-place graph transformation rules that are documented visually using BPMN syntax. In-place transformations update models directly and do not require mappings to other languages. We have used a mature tool and test-suite to develop a reference implementation of all rules.ResultsOur formalization is a promising complement to the standard, in particular because all rules have been extensively verified and because conceptual validation is facilitated (the informal semantics also describes in-place updates).Conclusion Since our formalization has already revealed problems with the standard and since the BPMN is still evolving, the maintainers of the standard can benefit from our results. Moreover, tool vendors can use our formalization and reference implementation for verifying conformance to the standard.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · Information and Software Technology
  • Source
    M. Weidlich · R. Dijkman · M. Weske
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Once multiple models of a business process are created for different purposes or to capture different variants, verification of behaviour equivalence or compatibility is needed. Equivalence verification ensures that two business process models specify the same behaviour. Since different process models are likely to differ with respect to their assumed level of abstraction and the actions that they take into account, equivalence notions have to cope with correspondences between sets of actions and actions that exist in one process but not in the other. In this paper, we present notions of equivalence and compatibility that can handle these problems. In essence, we present a notion of equivalence that works on correspondences between sets of actions rather than single actions. We then integrate our equivalence notion with work on behaviour inheritance that copes with actions that exist in one process but not in the other, leading to notions of behaviour compatibility. Compatibility notions verify that two models have the same behaviour with respect to the actions that they have in common. As such, our contribution is a collection of behaviour equivalence and compatibility notions that are applicable in more general settings than existing ones.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2012 · The Computer Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Becoming more and more process oriented, companies develop collections of hundreds or even thousands of business process models that represent the complex system of cooperating entities that form an organization. Designing and analyzing the structure of this system of business process models emerges as a new challenge, which is covered by the field of business process architecture. This paper presents a formal conceptual framework for representing and analyzing business process architectures. It identifies patterns of relations between process models, and it introduces anti-patterns that represent erroneous relations between them. The conceptual framework and the patterns are evaluated using a real-world process model collection. The evaluation shows that explicitly representing and analyzing relations between process models can help improving the correctness and consistency of the business process architecture as a whole.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Sep 2012
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Business process models are increasingly used by companies, often yielding repositories of several thousand models. These models are of great value for business analysis such as service identification or process standardization. A problem is though that many of these analyses require the pairwise comparison of process models, which is hardly feasible to do manually given an extensive number of models. While the computation of similarity between a pair of process models has been intensively studied in recent years, there is a notable gap on automatically matching activities of two process models. In this paper, we develop an approach based on semantic techniques and probabilistic optimization. We evaluate our approach using a sample of admission processes from different universities.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Sep 2012
  • Zhiqiang Yan · Remco Dijkman · Paul Grefen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nowadays, more and more organizations describe their operations in terms of business processes. Consequently, it is common for organizations to have collections of hundreds or even thousands of business process models. This calls for techniques to quickly retrieve business process models that satisfy a given query. Some advanced techniques for querying a collection business process models exist. However, these techniques mainly focus on the expressive power of the query language, and performing an advanced business process query using these techniques can take considerable time. Consequently, querying a collection of models can take considerable time. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an efficient technique, using feature nets. Experiments show that on average the technique performs two orders of magnitude faster than existing techniques.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Sep 2012
  • Source
    Zhiqiang Yan · Remco M. Dijkman · Paul W. P. J. Grefen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ContextLarge organizations often run hundreds or even thousands of different business processes. Managing such large collections of business process models is a challenging task. Software can assist in performing that task, by supporting common management functions such as storage, search and version management of models. It can also provide advanced functions that are specific for managing collections of process models, such as managing the consistency of public and private processes. Software that supports the management of large collections of business process models is called: business process model repository software.Objective This paper contributes to the development of business process model repositories, by analyzing the state of the art.Method To perform the analysis a literature survey and a comparison of existing (business process model) repository technology is performed.ResultThe results of the state of the art analysis are twofold. First, a framework for business process model repositories is presented, which consists of a management model and a reference architecture. The management model lists the functionality that can be provided and the reference architecture presents the components that provide that functionality. Second, an analysis is presented of the extent to which existing business process model repositories implement the functionality from the framework.Conclusion The results presented in the paper are valuable as a comprehensive overview of business process model repository functionality. In addition they form a basis for a future research agenda. We conclude that existing repositories focus on traditional functionality rather than exploiting the full potential of information management tools, thus we show that there is a strong basis for further research.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Information and Software Technology
  • Source
    Remco Dijkman · La M Rosa · Hajo A. Reijers
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nowadays, business process management is an important approach for managing organizations from an operational perspective. As a consequence, it is common to see organizations develop collections of hundreds or even thousands of business process models. Such large collections of process models bring new challenges and provide new opportunities, as the knowledge that they encapsulate requires to be properly managed. Therefore, a variety of techniques for managing large collections of business process models is being developed. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the management techniques that currently exist, as well as the open research challenges that they pose.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · Computers in Industry
  • Source
    Zhiqiang Yan · Remco Dijkman · Paul Grefen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nowadays, it is common for organizations to maintain collections of hundreds or even thousands of business processes. Techniques exist to search through such a collection, for business process models that are similar to a given query model. However, those techniques compare the query model to each model in the collection in terms of graph structure, which is inefficient and computationally complex. This paper presents an efficient algorithm for similarity search. The algorithm works by efficiently estimating model similarity, based on small characteristic model fragments, called features. The contribution of this paper is threefold. First, it presents three techniques to improve the efficiency of the currently fastest similarity search algorithm. Second, it presents a software architecture and prototype for a similarity search engine. Third, it presents an advanced evaluation of the algorithm. Experiments show that the algorithm in this paper helps to perform similarity search about 10 times faster than the original algorithm.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2012 · Distributed and Parallel Databases
  • Source
    La M Rosa · Marlon Dumas · Reina Uba · Remco M. Dijkman
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article addresses the problem of constructing consolidated business process models out of collections of process models that share common fragments. The article considers the construction of unions of multiple models (called merged models) as well as intersections (called digests). Merged models are intended for analysts who wish to create a model that subsumes a collection of process models -- typically representing variants of the same underlying process -- with the aim of replacing the variants with the merged model. Digests, on the other hand, are intended for analysts who wish to identify the most recurring fragments across a collection of process models, so that they can focus their efforts on optimizing these fragments. The article presents an algorithm for computing merged models and an algorithm for extracting digests from a merged model. The merging and digest extraction algorithms have been implemented and tested against collections of process models taken from multiple application domains. The tests show that the merging algorithm produces compact models and scales up to process models containing hundreds of nodes. Furthermore, a case study conducted in a large insurance company has demonstrated the usefulness of the merging and digest extraction operators in a practical setting.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology

Publication Stats

2k Citations
35.26 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2015
    • Technische Universiteit Eindhoven
      • Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
      Eindhoven, North Brabant, Netherlands
  • 2010
    • University of Tartu
      • Institute of Computer Science
      Dorpat, Tartu, Estonia
  • 2002-2006
    • University of Twente
      • Centre for Telematics and Information Technology (CTIT)
      Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands