Shoshana Goldenberg

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, H̱efa, Haifa, Israel

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Publications (16)28.34 Total impact

  • D Lewinson · M Rosenberg · S Goldenberg · M R Warburg
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    ABSTRACT: Carbonic anhydrase (CAH) was localized in the mitochondria-rich cells (MRC) of 1-week-old salamander larvae gill epithelium, in both MRC and pavement cells of 6-week-old larvae, and in regenerated stems of previously amputated gills. CAH activity of the MRC was measured quantitatively using a microscope densitometric technique. Changes in CAH activity per cell and changes in the numbers of CAH-positive MRC were followed under different H+ and Na+ concentrations at the two age groups. CAH activity per cell increased with age, whereas the numbers of CAH-positive MRC dropped. CAH activity per cell in the 1-week-old age group reached maximal values at pH 7.4 and stayed relatively high in the more alkaline media. Moderate increases of Na+ concentrations had small but significant effects on increasing CAH activity of gill MRC. When taking into consideration not only the changes in cellular activity but also the changes in the number of CAH-positive cells under the different acclimation media, an activity index (ICAH) was calculated. Thus, the ICAH in the 1-week-old was found to be dependent on the decline of ambient H+ concentrations (expressed as increasing pH), reaching maximal effect at pH 8.0. On the other hand, raising the Na+ concentrations of the acclimation media to 110 and 220 mOsm/liter caused a maximal inhibition of tissue CAH activity as expressed by ICAH. In conclusion, it is suggested that salamander larvae gill MRC take part in the adaptation of the larvae to changing H+ concentrations of their milieu rather than in their adaptation to changes in its osmolality.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1987 · Journal of Cellular Physiology
  • M.R Warburg · S Goldenberg · B Tudiver
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    ABSTRACT: 1.1. Haemolymph osmolality and ion (Cl−) concentration were studied in 2 intertidal crabs, Pachygrapsus marmoratus and P. transversus.2.2. The haemolymph osmolality hardly changed throughout the year.3.3. Both crabs were hyper-osmotic at salinities less concentrated than sea water, and hypo-osmotic at salinities of 125, 150, 175 and 200% sea water.4.4. Low (Cl−) concentration changed with the ambient salinities. It rose steeply at 200% sea water.5.5. Dehydration caused a rise in haemolymph osmolalities in both species but more significantly in P. transversus.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1987 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
  • C.S. Crawford · S. Goldenberg · M.R. Warburg
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    ABSTRACT: Water-loss rates, determined only for mesic-habitat millipedes, were higher than those known for desert spirostreptoids elsewhere. Seasonal levels of body water were similar among all populations, but most variable in xeric-habitat populations. -from Authors
    No preview · Article · Jan 1986 · Journal of Arid Environments
  • M.R Warburg · S Goldenberg
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    ABSTRACT: 1.1. Small crabs survived over 18% water loss and large crabs 21% when in dry air. Size, temperature and relative humidity affected this rate.2.2. Haemolymph osmolarity of newly collected crabs ranged from 530 to 630 mOsm/kg, depending on their size and the season.3.3. When dehydrated, haemolymph osmolarity rose to over 700 mOsm/kg, and ion concentration increased by over 10%.4.4. Crabs survived in sea-water for at least two weeks. Haemolymph osmolarity rose and ion concentration increased. The acclimation pattern affected the haemolymph osmolarity.
    No preview · Article · Dec 1984 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
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    G Degani · S Goldenberg · M.R Warburg
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    ABSTRACT: 1.1. Blood plasma osmolarity and ion concentration, and intra-cellular fluids (muscle) were determined in juvenile toadlets in tap water, in wet soil and after dehydration of 18% body weight or following acclimatization to 400 mM/1 urea.2.2. Plasma concentration increased during dehydration (375 mOsm/kg), after three months in soil (415 mOsm/kg), and after acclimatization to 400 mM/1 urea (540 mOsm/kg).3.3. In hydrated toadlets Na+ and Cl− accounted for 81% and urea for 2%, the latter increased to 22% when in soil.4.4. Urea concentration was higher in muscle of toadlets burrowed in soil or following acclimatization to 400 mM/1 urea.5.5. Sodium concentration increased in both plasma and muscle after dehydration or following acclimatization to 400 mM/1 urea. In both situations the animals lost weight.6.6. Potassium increased in muscle fluid when acclimated to urea, but was very low in all other experimental groups.7.7. Both plasma and muscle Cl− concentrations were found to be higher in animals after dehydration or following acclimatization to 400 mM/1 urea.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 1983 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
  • Shoshana Goldenberg · M R Warburg
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    ABSTRACT: Five amphibian species were studied for the effect of hypophysial hormones on their water balance. The species were three anurans, Rana ridibunda, Bufo viridis and Pelobates syriacus, and two urodeles Salamandra salamandra and Triturus vittatus. In the first four species different stages of development were studied, in the newt both the terrestrial and aquatic phases of the adult were examined. The hormones used were oxytocin (OXY), arginine vasotocin (AVT) and prolactin (PL). Oxytocin caused most water retention when compared with the other hormones, especially responding were juveniles of Rana and Bufo, but also the terrestrial phase of the adult newt Triturus. Arginine vasotocin affected mostly juvenile Pelobates. Prolactin caused water retention in juvenile Rana and in the terrestrial phase of Triturus. In general the hormones affected the juvenile stages more than either larvae or adults.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1983 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
  • Gad Degani · S. Goldenberg · M.R. ( Warburg

    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 1983
  • M. R. Warburg · Shoshana Goldenberg · Dina Rankevich
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    ABSTRACT: Locomotor activity of the aquatic/land crab Potamon potamios Olivier was studied at different temperatures and with reference to water balance conditions. Large crabs were diurnal more often than medium-sized ones. Both groups differed also in their activity pattern at different temperatures. Large crabs showed signs of a temperature adaptation as indicated by a drop in activity at high temperatures. Water loss up to 30°C was minimal and could not be a factor affecting the behavior of the crabs. At higher temperatures water loss increased and could affect the activity pattern.
    No preview · Article · Aug 1982 · Journal of Crustacean Biology
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    G. Degani · Shoshana Goldenberg · M.R. Warburg
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    ABSTRACT: Salamandra salamandra larvae originating from a single batch (layed by one female) were raised at different temperatures and on ion-rich or distilled water. Temperature, but not the presence or absence of ions affected growth. Larvae originating from one batch or from several batches born on the same day, were kept without food for long periods of several months in order to observe cannibalistic predation under such conditions. This phenomenon is known in natural populations of salamanders inhabitating either rain pools in rocks or permanent springs poor in aquatic life. It was found that cannibalism increased under experimental conditions proportionally to the increase in size between the larvae.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 1980 · Hydrobiologia
  • M.R Warburg · Shoshana Goldenberg · A Ben-Horin
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    ABSTRACT: 1.1. Evaporative water loss and haemolymph osmolarity were studied in four scorpion species: two from mesic habitats, Scorpio maurus fuscus (Scorpionidae) and Nebo hierochonticus (Diplocentridae); and two from xeric habitats, Buthotus judaicus and Leiurus quinquestriatus (both Buthidae).2.2. Low humidity and high temperatures increased both the percentage and the rate of water loss. This effect was more pronounced in the two mesic species.3.3. Haemolymph osmolarity increased at high temperature and low humidity. In humid air osmolarity dropped only in the mesic species but remained high in the xeric species.4.4. Haemolymph osmolarity was low in winter and high in summer.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1980 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
  • M.R Warburg · Shoshana Goldenberg
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    ABSTRACT: 1.1. The response to prolactin was followed throughout ontogenesis in Salamandra salamandra and in both terrestrial and aquatic phases of Triturus vittatus.2.2. The effect of prolactin was already noticeable in 1-week old larvae and highly significant later in the 3-month old juveniles.3.3. Both phases of the newt did not show a significant response to prolactin; however, the terrestrial phase of the newt responded much more than the aquatic phase.
    No preview · Article · Dec 1978 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
  • M.R Warburg · Shoshana Goldenberg
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    ABSTRACT: 1.1. The responses to oxytocin (OXY) and vasotocin (AVT) as indicated by water retention were followed throughout ontogenesis, in Salamandra salamandra (L.), and in both aquatic and terrestrial phases of Trilurus vittatus (Jenyns).2.2. In salamanders, OXY and AVT started causing water retention at metamorphosis. The highest response to OXY was noticeable in juveniles. The adult salamanders responded only to AVT.3.3. In the newt, the terrestrial phase was affected more by OXY than the aquatic phase.
    No preview · Article · Dec 1978 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
  • Shoshana Goldenberg · M.R Warburg
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    ABSTRACT: 1.1. Tadpoles with 2 or 3 limbs responded to AVT.2.2. The response reached its peak in juveniles but dropped when they stayed on ground.3.3. Only little response was noted in adults.4.4. AVT had a continuous effect in juveniles lasting over 48 hr
    No preview · Article · Dec 1977 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
  • Shoshana Goldenberg · M R Warburg
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    ABSTRACT: 1.1. Treatment with prolactin caused a weight increase in tadpoles and juveniles of Rana ridibunda and Bufo viridis.2.2. This response indicates absorption of water. The response was followed throughout pre- and post-metamorphic stages.3.3. In R. ridibunda prolactin started showing an effect in tadpoles just before metamorphosis and not earlier.4.4. This response reached its climax in the juvenile frogs, declining in the following post-metamorphic stages.5.5. Juvenile frogs of late summer metamorphosis responded to a great extent, whereas spring metamorphosing frogs did not respond.6.6. Only the smaller adult frogs showed some response.7.7. In the toad B. viridis the response started already at the four-legged tadpole, reaching its climax in juvenile toadlets. Thereafter the response dropped in both juveniles and adults.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1977 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A Physiology
  • Shoshana Goldenberg · M.R. Warburg
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    ABSTRACT: The response to oxytocin of two anuran amphibians Rana ridibunda and Bufo viridis was studied throughout ontogenesis.2. The response of R. ridibunda tadpoles to oxytocin started already at the stage of two legs increasing greatly with maturation of the tadpole, reaching its climax upon metamorphosis and dropping thereafter whether kept on wet ground or in water.3. In B. viridis the response started at the tadpole stage, reaching its climax at the juvenile stage, where this response was much higher than in R. ridibunda.4. In both species, post metamorphic growth affected the response to oxytocin by causing its decline. A positive correlation was found between these two phenomena.5. Some differences were found in the response to oxytocin between summer and winter frogs.6. The response in vitro of the bladder of adult R. ridibunda was higher than that of the juveniles.7. The response in vitro of ventral epidermis was higher in juveniles than in adults.8. The response in vitro of dorsal epidermis was higher in the adult frogs.9. Summer frogs' epidermis responded less than that of the winter frogs.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1976 · Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part C Comparative Pharmacology
  • M.R. Warburg · S. Goldenberg · A. Ben-Horin

    No preview · Article ·