Are you Klaus M Weinberger?

Claim your profile

Publications (59)

  • Source
    Marc Breit · Michael Netzer · Klaus M Weinberger · Christian Baumgartner
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The objectives of this work were the classification of dynamic metabolic biomarker candidates and the modeling and characterization of kinetic regulatory mechanisms in human metabolism with response to external perturbations by physical activity. Longitudinal metabolic concentration data of 47 individuals from 4 different groups were examined, obtained from a cycle ergometry cohort study. In total, 110 metabolites (within the classes of acylcarnitines, amino acids, and sugars) were measured through a targeted metabolomics approach, combining tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with the concept of stable isotope dilution (SID) for metabolite quantitation. Biomarker candidates were selected by combined analysis of maximum fold changes (MFCs) in concentrations and P-values resulting from statistical hypothesis testing. Characteristic kinetic signatures were identified through a mathematical modeling approach utilizing polynomial fitting. Modeled kinetic signatures were analyzed for groups with similar behavior by applying hierarchical cluster analysis. Kinetic shape templates were characterized, defining different forms of basic kinetic response patterns, such as sustained, early, late, and other forms, that can be used for metabolite classification. Acetylcarnitine (C2), showing a late response pattern and having the highest values in MFC and statistical significance, was classified as late marker and ranked as strong predictor (MFC = 1.97, P < 0.001). In the class of amino acids, highest values were shown for alanine (MFC = 1.42, P < 0.001), classified as late marker and strong predictor. Glucose yields a delayed response pattern, similar to a hockey stick function, being classified as delayed marker and ranked as moderate predictor (MFC = 1.32, P < 0.001). These findings coincide with existing knowledge on central metabolic pathways affected in exercise physiology, such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, glycolysis, and glycogenolysis. The presented modeling approach demonstrates high potential for dynamic biomarker identification and the investigation of kinetic mechanisms in disease or pharmacodynamics studies using MS data from longitudinal cohort studies.
    Full-text Article · Aug 2015 · PLoS Computational Biology
  • Marc Breit · Klaus M Weinberger
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasingly recognized burden for patients and health care systems with high (and growing) global incidence and prevalence, significant mortality, and disproportionately high treatment costs. Yet, the available diagnostic tools are either impractical in clinical routine or have serious shortcomings impeding a well-informed disease management although optimized treatment strategies with proven benefits for the patients have become available. Advances in bioanalytical technologies have facilitated studies that identified genomic, proteomic, and metabolic biomarker candidates, and confirmed some of them in independent cohorts. This review summarizes the CKD-related markers discovered so far, and focuses on compounds and pathways, for which there is quantitative data, substantiating evidence from translational research, and a mechanistic understanding of the processes involved. Also, multiparametric marker panels have been suggested that showed promising diagnostic and prognostic performance in initial analyses although the data basis from prospective trials is very limited. Large-scale studies, however, are underway and will provide the information for validating a set of parameters and discarding others. Finally, the path from clinical research to a routine application is discussed, focusing on potential obstacles such as the use of mass spectrometry, and the feasibility of obtaining regulatory approval for targeted metabolomics assays. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Article · Jul 2015 · Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is part of a number of systemic and renal diseases and may reach epidemic proportions over the next decade. Efforts have been made to improve diagnosis and management of CKD. We hypothesised that combining metabolomic and proteomic approaches could generate a more systemic and complete view of the disease mechanisms. To test this approach, we examined samples from a cohort of 49 patients representing different stages of CKD. Urine samples were analysed for proteomic changes using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and urine and plasma samples for metabolomic changes using different mass spectrometry-based techniques. The training set included 20 CKD patients selected according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at mild (59.9±16.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) or advanced (8.9±4.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) CKD and the remaining 29 patients left for the test set. We identified a panel of 76 statistically significant metabolites and peptides that correlated with CKD in the training set. We combined these biomarkers in different classifiers and then performed correlation analyses with eGFR at baseline and follow-up after 2.8±0.8 years in the test set. A solely plasma metabolite biomarker-based classifier significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function in the test set at baseline and follow-up (ρ = -0.8031; p
    Full-text Article · May 2014 · PLoS ONE
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Patients with CKD display altered plasma amino acid profiles. This study estimated the association between the estimated GFR and urinary and plasma amino acid profiles in CKD patients. Urine and plasma samples were taken from 52 patients with different stages of CKD, and plasma samples only were taken from 25 patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Metabolic profiling was performed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry after phenylisothiocyanate derivatization. Most plasma amino acid concentrations were decreased in hemodialysis patients, whereas proline, citrulline, asparagine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, and hydroxykynurenine levels were increased (P<0.05). Both plasma levels and urinary excretion of citrulline were higher in the group of patients with advanced CKD (CKD stages 2 and 3 versus CKD stages 4 and 5; in plasma: 35.9±16.3 versus 61.8±23.6 µmol/L, P<0.01; in urine: 1.0±1.2 versus 7.1±14.3 µmol/mol creatinine, P<0.001). Plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine levels were higher in advanced CKD (CKD stages 2 and 3, 0.57±0.29; CKD stages 4 and 5, 1.02±0.48, P<0.001), whereas urinary excretion was lower (2.37±0.93 versus 1.51±1.43, P<0.001). Multivariate analyses adjusting on estimated GFR, serum albumin, proteinuria, and other covariates revealed associations between diabetes and plasma citrulline (P=0.02) and between serum sodium and plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (P=0.03). Plasma tyrosine to phenylalanine and valine to glycine ratios were lower in advanced CKD stages (P<0.01). CKD patients have altered plasma and urinary amino acid profiles that are not corrected by dialysis. Depending on solutes, elevated plasma levels were associated with increased or decreased urinary excretion, depicting situations of uremic retention (asymmetric dimethylarginine) or systemic overproduction (citrulline). These results give some insight in the CKD-associated modifications of amino acid metabolism, which may help improve their handling.
    Article · Nov 2013 · Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Abstract Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline, Denise Sonntag, Urs Hefti, Lorenz Risch, Otto D. Schoch, Alexander J. Turk, Thomas Hess, Konrad E Bloch, Marco Maggiorini, Tobias M. Merz, Klaus M. Weinberger, and Andreas R. Huber. Oxidative stress in hypobaric hypoxia and influence on vessel-tone modifying mediators. High Alt Med Biol. 14:273-279, 2013.-Increased pulmonary artery pressure is a well-known phenomenon of hypoxia and is seen in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases, and also in mountaineers on high altitude expedition. Different mediators are known to regulate pulmonary artery vessel tone. However, exact mechanisms are not fully understood and a multimodal process consisting of a whole panel of mediators is supposed to cause pulmonary artery vasoconstriction. We hypothesized that increased hypoxemia is associated with an increase in vasoconstrictive mediators and decrease of vasodilatators leading to a vasoconstrictive net effect. Furthermore, we suggested oxidative stress being partly involved in changement of these parameters. Oxygen saturation (Sao2) and clinical parameters were assessed in 34 volunteers before and during a Swiss research expedition to Mount Muztagh Ata (7549 m) in Western China. Blood samples were taken at four different sites up to an altitude of 6865 m. A mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomic platform was used to detect multiple parameters, and revealed functional impairment of enzymes that require oxidation-sensitive cofactors. Specifically, the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-dependent enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) showed significantly lower activities (citrulline-to-arginine ratio decreased from baseline median 0.21 to 0.14 at 6265 m), indicating lower NO availability resulting in less vasodilatative activity. Correspondingly, an increase in systemic oxidative stress was found with a significant increase of the percentage of methionine sulfoxide from a median 6% under normoxic condition to a median level of 30% (p<0.001) in camp 1 at 5533 m. Furthermore, significant increase in vasoconstrictive mediators (e.g., tryptophan, serotonin, and peroxidation-sensitive lipids) were found. During ascent up to 6865 m, significant altitude-dependent changes in multiple vessel-tone modifying mediators with excess in vasoconstrictive metabolites could be demonstrated. These changes, as well as highly significant increase in systemic oxidative stress, may be predictive for increase in acute mountain sickness score and changes in Sao2.
    Full-text Article · Sep 2013 · High altitude medicine & biology
  • Source
    Full-text Dataset · Jul 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Alcohol consumption is one of the world's major risk factors for disease development. But underlying mechanisms by which moderate-to-heavy alcohol intake causes damage are poorly understood and biomarkers are sub-optimal. Here, we investigated metabolite concentration differences in relation to alcohol intake in 2090 individuals of the KORA F4 and replicated results in 261 KORA F3 and up to 629 females of the TwinsUK adult bioresource. Using logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, high-density lipoproteins and triglycerides, we identified 40/18 significant metabolites in males/females with P-values <3.8E-04 (Bonferroni corrected) that differed in concentrations between moderate-to-heavy drinkers (MHD) and light drinkers (LD) in the KORA F4 study. We further identified specific profiles of the 10/5 metabolites in males/females that clearly separated LD from MHD in the KORA F4 cohort. For those metabolites, the respective area under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.812/0.679, respectively, thus providing moderate-to-high sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of LD to MHD. A number of alcohol-related metabolites could be replicated in the KORA F3 and TwinsUK studies. Our data suggests that metabolomic profiles based on diacylphosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ether lipids and sphingolipids form a new class of biomarkers for excess alcohol intake and have potential for future epidemiological and clinical studies.
    Full-text Article · Jul 2013 · Translational Psychiatry
  • Source
    Dataset: Table S2
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Variables with significant differences when comparing the 2 main clusters identified with the values of the CKD273 peptides (clusters C and D). (XLS)
    Full-text Dataset · May 2013
  • Source
    Dataset: Table S3
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Urinary peptides of the CKD273 model, which significantly correlated with eGFR. (XLS)
    Full-text Dataset · May 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: National Kidney Foundation CKD staging has allowed uniformity in studies on CKD. However, early diagnosis and predicting progression to end stage renal disease are yet to be improved. Seventy six patients with different levels of CKD, including outpatients and dialysed patients were studied for transcriptome, metabolome and proteome description. High resolution urinary proteome analysis was blindly performed in the 53 non-anuric out of the 76 CKD patients. In addition to routine clinical parameters, CKD273, a urinary proteomics-based classifier and its peptides were quantified. The baseline values were analyzed with regard to the clinical parameters and the occurrence of death or renal death during follow-up (3.6 years) as the main outcome measurements. None of the patients with CKD273<0.55 required dialysis or died while all fifteen patients that reached an endpoint had a CKD273 score >0.55. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the CKD273 peptides separated the patients into two main groups differing in CKD associated parameters. Among the 273 biomarkers, peptides derived from serum proteins were relatively increased in patients with lower glomerular filtration rate, while collagen-derived peptides were relatively decreased (p<0.05; Spearman). CKD273 was different in the groups with different renal function (p<0.003). The CKD273 classifier separated CKD patients according to their renal function and informed on the likelihood of experiencing adverse outcome. Recently defined in a large population, CKD273 is the first proteomic-based classifier successfully tested for prognosis of CKD progression in an independent cohort.
    Full-text Article · May 2013 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    Dataset: Table S1
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Clinical data and CKD273 classifier scoring of the individual subjects in the study. (XLS)
    Full-text Dataset · May 2013
  • Source
    Dataset: Figure S1
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Correlation studies of Urinary protein excretion and CKD273 classifier scoring. It can be observed that urinary protein excretion and CKD273 scoring followed an exponential function and were significantly correlated (Spearman ς = 0.76; p<0.0001). (TIF)
    Full-text Dataset · May 2013
  • Conference Paper · May 2013
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The identification and interpretation of metabolic biomarkers is a challenging task. In this context, network-based approaches have become increasingly a key technology in systems biology allowing to capture complex interactions in biological systems. In this work, we introduce a novel network-based method to identify highly predictive biomarker candidates for disease. First, we infer two different types of networks: (i) correlation networks, and (ii) a new type of network called ratio networks. Based on these networks, we introduce scores to prioritize features using topological descriptors of the vertices. To evaluate our method we use an example dataset where quantitative targeted MS/MS analysis was applied to a total of 52 blood samples from 22 persons with obesity (BMI >30) and 30 healthy controls. Using our network-based feature selection approach we identified highly discriminating metabolites for obesity (F-score >0.85, accuracy >85%), some of which could be verified by the literature.
    Article · Jul 2012 · Journal of Theoretical Biology
  • Source
    Michael Netzer · Klaus M Weinberger · Michael Handler · [...] · Christian Baumgartner
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: In metabolomics, biomarker discovery is a highly data driven process and requires sophisticated computational methods for the search and prioritization of novel and unforeseen biomarkers in data, typically gathered in preclinical or clinical studies. In particular, the discovery of biomarker candidates from longitudinal cohort studies is crucial for kinetic analysis to better understand complex metabolic processes in the organism during physical activity. In this work we introduce a novel computational strategy that allows to identify and study kinetic changes of putative biomarkers using targeted MS/MS profiling data from time series cohort studies or other cross-over designs. We propose a prioritization model with the objective of classifying biomarker candidates according to their discriminatory ability and couple this discovery step with a novel network-based approach to visualize, review and interpret key metabolites and their dynamic interactions within the network. The application of our method on longitudinal stress test data revealed a panel of metabolic signatures, i.e., lactate, alanine, glycine and the short-chain fatty acids C2 and C3 in trained and physically fit persons during bicycle exercise. We propose a new computational method for the discovery of new signatures in dynamic metabolic profiling data which revealed known and unexpected candidate biomarkers in physical activity. Many of them could be verified and confirmed by literature. Our computational approach is freely available as R package termed BiomarkeR under LGPL via CRAN http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/BiomarkeR/.
    Full-text Article · Dec 2011 · Journal of Clinical Bioinformatics
  • Source
    Michael Netzer · Klaus M Weinberger · Michael Handler · [...] · Christian Baumgartner
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Simulation results. This PDF file contains an additional figure comparing mean accuracies for different thresholds using controlled simulated data and a K-nearest-neighbor as classifier.
    Full-text Dataset · Dec 2011
  • Source
    Denise Sonntag · Francesca M Scandurra · Torben Friedrich · [...] · Klaus M Weinberger
    Full-text Article · Nov 2011 · BMC proceedings
  • Source
    Ulrika Lundin · Robert Modre-Osprian · Klaus M. Weinberger
    Full-text Chapter · Nov 2011
  • Klaus M. Weinberger
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Until recently, systems biology has relied on genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. Trailblazing as these areas have been, they do not tell the whole story of what is happening in a cell. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have now added yet another powerful tool to the armamentarium of systems biology, i.e., metabolomics, or the study of the metabolome - the collection of all metabolites in a biological system. By being able to simultaneously assess hundreds, potentially even thousands of metabolites, modern mass-spectrometric techniques produce high-resolution biochemical snapshots depicting the functional endpoints of genetic predisposition and the sum of all environmental influences, including nutrition, exercise, and medication. This snapshot is a reflection of the physiology—or pathophysiology—of a cell or an entire organism. The proof-of-concept for targeted metabolomics was first established in routine clinical diagnostics, i.e., in the screening of newborns for inborn errors of metabolism. Since the late 1990s, the diagnosis of inherited diseases has been revolutionized using mass-spectrometric assays for quantifying sets of amino acids and acylcarnitines. Positive experiences in routine diagnostics of inborn errors of metabolism over many years, improved sensitivity and reproducibility of quantitative multiparametric assays through innovations in instruments and experiments make the use of additional diagnostic applications in clinical practice likely in the years to come. This presentation summarizes the scientific and technological backgrounds, the rapid development of metabolomics in the past years and looks at the future potential of high resolution metabolic pathway analytics for future diagnostics.
    Conference Paper · May 2011
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Nutrition plays an important role in human metabolism and health. However, it is unclear in how far self-reported nutrition intake reflects de facto differences in body metabolite composition. To investigate this question on an epidemiological scale we conducted a metabolomics study analyzing the association of self-reported nutrition habits with 363 metabolites quantified in blood serum of 284 male participants of the KORA population study, aged between 55 and 79 years. Using data from an 18-item food frequency questionnaire, the consumption of 18 different food groups as well as four derived nutrition indices summarizing these food groups by their nutrient content were analyzed for association with the measured metabolites. The self-reported nutrition intake index "polyunsaturated fatty acids" associates with a decrease in saturation of the fatty acid chains of glycero-phosphatidylcholines analyzed in serum samples. Using a principal component analysis dietary patterns highly associating with serum metabolite concentrations could be identified. The first principal component, which was interpreted as a healthy nutrition lifestyle, associates with a decrease in the degree of saturation of the fatty acid moieties of different glycero-phosphatidylcholines. In summary, this analysis shows that on a population level metabolomics provides the possibility to link self-reported nutrition habits to changes in human metabolic profiles and that the associating metabolites reflect the self-reported nutritional intake. Moreover, we could show that the strength of association increases when composed nutrition indices are used. Metabolomics may, thus, facilitate evaluating questionnaires and improving future questionnaire-based epidemiological studies on human health.
    Full-text Article · Feb 2011 · European Journal of Epidemiology