M. Marelli

Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States

Are you M. Marelli?

Claim your profile

Publications (75)468.01 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During a search for coherent signals in the X-ray archival data of XMM–Newton, we discovered a modulation at 1.2 s in 3XMM J004301.4+413017 (3X J0043), a source lying in the direction of an external arm of M 31. This short period indicates a neutron star (NS). Between 2000 and 2013, the position of 3X J0043 was imaged by public XMM–Newton observations 35 times. The analysis of these data allowed us to detect an orbital modulation at 1.27 d and study the long-term properties of the source. The emission of the pulsar was rather hard (most spectra are described by a power law with Γ < 1) and, assuming the distance to M 31, the 0.3–10 keV luminosity was variable, from ∼3 × 1037 to 2 × 1038 erg s−1. The analysis of optical data shows that, while 3X J0043 is likely associated to a globular cluster in M 31, a counterpart with V ≳ 22 outside the cluster cannot be excluded. Considering our findings, there are two main viable scenarios for 3X J0043: a peculiar low-mass X-ray binary, similar to 4U 1822−37 or 4U 1626−67, or an intermediate-mass X-ray binary resembling Her X−1. Regardless of the exact nature of the system, 3X J0043 is the first accreting NS in M 31 in which the spin period has been detected.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. We model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: X-ray emission from Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) is crucial to understand star formation. A very limited amount of X-ray results is available for the protostellar (ClassI) phase. A systematic search of transient X-ray phenomena combined with a careful evaluation of the evolutionary stage offer a widely unexplored window to our understanding of YSOs X-ray properties. Within the EXTraS project, a search for transients and variability in the whole XMM-Newton archive, we discover transient X-ray emission consistent with ISO-Oph 85, a strongly embedded YSO in the rho Ophiuchi region, not detected in previous time-averaged X-ray studies. We extract an X-ray light curve for the flare and determine its spectral parameters from XMM-Newton/EPIC (European Photon Imaging Camera) data using quantile analysis. The X-ray flare ($2500\,s$), the only one detected in the XMM-Newton archive for ISO-Oph 85, has a luminosity of $LogL_X[erg/s]=31.1$ and a spectrum consistent with a highly-absorbed one-component thermal model ($N_H=1.0^{+1.2}_{-0.5}10^{23}\,cm^{-2}$, $kT=1.15^{+2.35}_{-0.65}\,keV)$. We set an upper limit of $LogL_X[erg/s]<29.5$ to the quiescent X-ray luminosity. We build a SED with IR to mm photometry drawn from literature and mid-IR Spitzer and sub-mm Herschel photometry analysed by us, and compare it with pre-computed models. The sub-mm emission peak in the Herschel data suggests that the object is a ClassI protostar. However, the Herschel/IR position offset is larger than for other YSOs in the region, leaving some doubt on the association. This is the first X-ray flare from a YSO recognised as a candidate ClassI YSO via the analysis of its complete SED. This work shows how the analysis of the whole SED is fundamental for the classification of YSOs, and how the X-ray source detection techniques we developed can open a new era in time-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission from stars.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present multi-wavelength observations of the unassociated gamma-ray source 3FGL J2039.6-5618 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The source gamma-ray properties suggest that it is a pulsar, most likely a millisecond pulsar, for which neither radio nor $\gamma$-ray pulsations have been detected yet. We observed 3FGL J2039.6-5618 with XMM-Newton and discovered several candidate X-ray counterparts within/close to the gamma-ray error box. The brightest of these X-ray sources is variable with a period of 0.2245$\pm$0.0081 d. Its X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index $\Gamma_X =1.36\pm0.09$, and hydrogen column density $N_{\rm H} < 4 \times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$, which gives an unabsorbed 0.3--10 keV X-ray flux of $1.02 \times 10^{-13}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Observations with the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) discovered an optical counterpart to this X-ray source, with a time-average magnitude $g'\sim 19.5$. The counterpart features a flux modulation with a period of 0.22748$\pm$0.00043 d that coincides, within the errors, with that of the X-ray source, confirming the association based on the positional coincidence. We interpret the observed X-ray/optical periodicity as the orbital period of a close binary system where one of the two members is a neutron star. The light curve profile of the companion star, with two asymmetric peaks, suggests that the optical emission comes from two regions at different temperatures on its tidally-distorted surface. Based upon its X-ray and optical properties, we consider this source as the most likely X-ray counterpart to 3FGL J2039.6-5618, which we propose to be a new redback system.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We analyzed a deep XMM-Newton observations of the radio-quiet gamma-ray PSR J2055+2539. The spectrum of the X-ray counterpart is non-thermal, with a photon index of 2.36$\pm$0.14 (1$\sigma$ confidence). We detected X-ray pulsations with a pulsed fraction of (25$\pm$3)% and a sinusoidal shape. Taking into account considerations on the gamma-ray efficiency of the pulsar and on its X-ray spectrum, we can infer a pulsar distance ranging from 450 pc to 750 pc. We found two different nebular features associated to PSR J2055+2539 and protruding from it. The angle between the two nebular main axes is $\sim$ (162.8$\pm$0.7) degrees. The main, brighter feature is 12'-long and <20"-thick, characterized by an asymmetry with respect to the main axis that evolves with the distance from the pulsar, possibly forming a helical pattern. The secondary feature is 250" x 30". Both nebulae present an almost flat brightness profile with a sudden decrease at the end. The nebulae can be fitted either by a power-law model or a thermal bremsstrahlung model. A plausible interpretation of the brighter nebula is in terms of a collimated ballistic jet. The secondary nebula is most likely a classical synchrotron-emitting tail.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of PSR J1906+0722, a gamma-ray pulsar detected as part of a blind survey of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources being carried out on the volunteer distributed computing system, Einstein@Home. This newly discovered pulsar previously appeared as the most significant remaining unidentified gamma-ray source without a known association in the second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) and was among the top 10 most significant unassociated sources in the recent third catalog (3FGL). PSR J1906+0722 is a young, energetic, isolated pulsar, with a spin frequency of 8.9 Hz, a characteristic age of 49 kyr, and spin-down power 1.0 ́ 1036 erg s−1. In 2009 August it suffered one of the largest glitches detected from a gamma-ray pulsar (Df f » 4.5 ́ 10-6). Remaining undetected in dedicated radio follow-up observations, the pulsar is likely radio-quiet. An off-pulse analysis of the gamma-ray flux from the location of PSR J1906+0722 revealed the presence of an additional nearby source, which may be emission from the interaction between a neighboring supernova remnant and a molecular cloud. We discuss possible effects which may have hindered the detection of PSR J1906+0722 in previous searches and describe the methods by which these effects were mitigated in this survey. We also demonstrate the use of advanced timing methods for estimating the positional, spin and glitch parameters of difficult-to-time pulsars such as this.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal Letters
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of PSR J1906+0722, a gamma-ray pulsar detected as part of a blind survey of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources being carried out on the volunteer distributed computing system, Einstein@Home. This newly discovered pulsar previously appeared as the most significant remaining unidentified gamma-ray source without a known association in the second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) and was among the top ten most significant unassociated sources in the recent third catalog (3FGL). PSR J1906+0722 is a young, energetic, isolated pulsar, with a spin frequency of $8.9$ Hz, a characteristic age of $49$ kyr, and spin-down power $1.0 \times 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$. In 2009 August it suffered one of the largest glitches detected from a gamma-ray pulsar ($\Delta f / f \approx 4.5\times10^{-6}$). Remaining undetected in dedicated radio follow-up observations, the pulsar is likely radio-quiet. An off-pulse analysis of the gamma-ray flux from the location of PSR J1906+0722 revealed the presence of an additional nearby source, which may be emission from the interaction between a neighboring supernova remnant and a molecular cloud. We discuss possible effects which may have hindered the detection of PSR J1906+0722 in previous searches and describe the methods by which these effects were mitigated in this survey. We also demonstrate the use of advanced timing methods for estimating the positional, spin and glitch parameters of difficult-to-time pulsars such as this.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet Gamma-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from Gamma-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for an about 10 arcsec-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. 2011 and confirm that, on average, the Gamma-ray--to--X-ray flux ratios (Fgamma/Fx) of radio-quiet pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud ones. Furthermore, while the Fgamma/Fx distribution features a single peak for the radio-quiet pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the radio-loud ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of magnetospheres of isolated neutron stars. For a summary, we refer to the paper.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We have analyzed the new deep {\it XMM-Newton} and {\it Chandra} observations of the energetic radio-quiet pulsar J1813$-$1246. The X-ray spectrum is non-thermal, very hard and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available {\it Fermi} ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The $\gamma$-ray lightcurve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardenning towards the bridge. The X-ray peaks lag the $\gamma$-ray ones by 0.25 in phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with {\it INTEGRAL} IBIS/ISGRI, that is consistent with the extrapolation of both the soft X-ray and $\gamma$-ray emission of J1813. The peculiar X and $\gamma$-ray phasing suggests a singular emission geometry. We discuss some possibilities within the current pulsar emission models. Finally, we develop an alternative geometrical model where the X-ray emission comes from polar cap pair cascades.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint γ-ray pulsar J1741–2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the γ-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are ~35%-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal-folded profile well. A 10 bin phase-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the γ-ray peak by more than half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range, in agreement with the radio dispersion measure.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint $\gamma$-ray pulsar J1741-2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of 5 years of Fermi LAT data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the $\gamma$-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are about 35-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal folded profile well. A 10-bin phase-resolved analysis shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray and $\gamma$-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the $\gamma$-ray peak by over half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi has detected ~150 gamma-ray pulsars, about a third of which were discovered in blind searches of the $\gamma$-ray data. Because the angular resolution of the LAT is relatively poor and blind searches for pulsars (especially millisecond pulsars, MSPs) are very sensitive to an error in the position, one must typically scan large numbers of locations. Identifying plausible X-ray counterparts of a putative pulsar drastically reduces the number of trials, thus improving the sensitivity of pulsar blind searches with the LAT. I discuss our ongoing program of Swift, XMM-Newton, and Chandra observations of LAT unassociated sources in the context of our blind searches for gamma-ray pulsars.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Astronomische Nachrichten
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) have been established as the most populous class of TeV gamma-ray emitters. Since launch, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT)identified five high-energy (100MeV <E< 100 GeV) gamma-ray sources as PWNe, and detected a large number of PWNe candidates, all powered by young and energetic pulsars. The wealth of multi-wavelength data available and the new results provided by Fermi-LAT give us an opportunity to find new PWNe and to explore the radiative processes taking place in known ones. The TeV gamma-ray unidentifiedsources (UNIDs) are the best candidates for finding new PWNe. Using 45 months of Fermi-LAT data for energies above 10 GeV, an analysis was performed near the position of 58TeV PWNe and UNIDs within 5deg of the Galactic Plane to establish new constraints on PWNe properties and find new clues on the nature of UNIDs. Of the 58 sources, 30 were detected, and this work provides their gamma-rayfluxes for energies above 10 GeV. The spectral energy distributions (SED) andupper limits, in the multi-wavelength context, also provide new information on the source nature and can help distinguish between emission scenarios, i.e. between classification as a pulsar candidate or as a PWN candidate. Six new GeV PWNe candidates are described in detail and compared with existing models. A population study of GeV PWNe candidates as a function of the pulsar/PWN system characteristics is presented.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Long-term monitoring of PSR J2021+4026 in the heart of the Cygnus region with the Fermi Large Area Telescope unveiled a sudden decrease in flux above 100 MeV over a timescale shorter than a week. The "jump" was near MJD 55850 (2011 October 16), with the flux decreasing from (8.33 ± 0.08) × 10-10 erg cm-2 s-1 to (6.86 ± 0.13) × 10-10 erg cm-2 s-1. Simultaneously, the frequency spindown rate increased from (7.8 ± 0.1) × 10-13 Hz s-1 to (8.1 ± 0.1) × 10-13 Hz s-1. Significant (>5σ) changes in the pulse profile and marginal (<3σ) changes in the emission spectrum occurred at the same time. There is also evidence for a small, steady flux increase over the 3 yr preceding MJD 55850. This is the first observation at γ-ray energies of mode changes and intermittent behavior, observed at radio wavelengths for other pulsars. We argue that the change in pulsed γ-ray emission is due to a change in emission beaming and we speculate that it is precipitated by a shift in the magnetic field structure, leading to a change of either effective magnetic inclination or effective current.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using a new XMM-Newton observation, we have characterized the X-ray properties of the middle-aged radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar J0357+3205 (named Morla) and its tail. The X-ray emission from the pulsar is consistent with a magnetospheric non-thermal origin plus a thermal emission from a hot spot (or hot spots). The lack of a thermal component from the whole surface makes Morla the coldest neutron star in its age range. We found marginal evidence for a double-peaked modulation of the X-ray emission. The study of the 9'-long tail confirmed the lack of extended emission near the pulsar itself. The tail shows a very asymmetric brightness profile and its spectrum lacks any spatial variation. We found the nebular emission to be inconsistent with a classical bow-shock, ram-pressure dominated pulsar wind nebula. We propose thermal bremsstrahlung as an alternative mechanism for Morla's tail emission. In this scenario, the tail emission comes from the shocked interstellar medium (ISM) material heated up to X-ray temperatures. This can fully explain the peculiar features of the tail, assuming a hot, moderately dense interstellar medium around the pulsar. For a bremsstrahlung-emitting tail, we can estimate the pulsar distance to be between 300 and 900 pc. A pulsar velocity of about 1900 km/s is required - which would make Morla the pulsar with the largest velocity - and high inclination angles (>70 degrees) are preferred. We propose Morla's nebula as the first example of a new "turtle's tail" class of thermally-emitting nebulae associated to high velocity pulsars.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The middle-aged PSR J0357+3205 is a nearby, radio-quiet, bright gamma-ray pulsar discovered by the Fermi mission. Our previous Chandra observation revealed a huge, very peculiar structure of diffuse X-ray emission, originating at the pulsar position and extending for > 9' on the plane of the sky. To better understand the nature of such a nebula, we have studied the proper motion of the parent pulsar. We performed relative astrometry on Chandra images of the field spanning a time baseline of 2.2 yr, unveiling a significant angular displacement of the pulsar counterpart, corresponding to a proper motion of 0.165"+/-0.030" yr^(-1). At a distance of ~500 pc, the space velocity of the pulsar would be of ~390 km s^(-1) assuming no inclination with respect to the plane of the sky. The direction of the pulsar proper motion is perfectly aligned with the main axis of the X-ray nebula, pointing to a physical, yet elusive link between the nebula and the pulsar space velocity. No optical emission in the H_alpha line is seen in a deep image collected at the Gemini telescope, which implies that the interstellar medium into which the pulsar is moving is fully ionized.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012 · The Astrophysical Journal Letters
  • Source
    M. Razzano · R. P. Mignani · M. Marelli · A. de Luca
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PSR J1048−5832 is a Vela-like (P = 123.6 ms; τ ∼ 20.3 kyr) γ-ray pulsar detected by Fermi, at a distance of ∼2.7 kpc and with a rotational energy loss rate $\dot{E}_{\rm SD} \sim 2 \times 10^{36}$ erg s−1. The PSR J1048−5832 field has been observed with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in the V and R bands. We used these data to determine the colour of the object detected closest to the Chandra position (Star D) and to confirm that it is not associated with the pulsar. For the estimated extinction along the line of sight, inferred from a re-analysis of the Chandra and XMM–Newton spectra, the fluxes of Star D (V ∼ 26.7; R ∼ 25.8) imply a − 0.13 ≲ (V − R)0 ≲ 0.6. This means that the PSR J1048−5832 spectrum would be unusually red compared to the Vela pulsar. Moreover, the ratio between the unabsorbed optical and X-ray flux of PSR J1048−5832 would be much higher than for other young pulsars. Thus, we conclude that Star D is not the PSR J1048−5832 counterpart. We compared the derived R- and V-band upper limits (R ≳ 26.4; V ≳ 27.6) with the extrapolation of the X-ray and γ-ray spectra and constrained the pulsar spectrum at low energies. In particular, the VLT upper limits suggest that the pulsar spectrum could be consistent with a single power law, stretching from the γ rays to the optical.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of PSR J1838-0537, a gamma-ray pulsar found through a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsar has a spin frequency of 6.9 Hz and a frequency derivative of -2.2e-11 Hz/s, implying a young characteristic age of 4970 years and a large spin-down power of 5.9e36 erg/s. Follow-up observations with radio telescopes detected no pulsations, thus PSR J1838-0537 appears radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. In September 2009 the pulsar suffered the largest glitch so far seen in any gamma-ray-only pulsar, causing a relative increase in spin frequency of about 5.5e-6. After the glitch, during a putative recovery period, the timing analysis is complicated by the sparsity of the LAT photon data, the weakness of the pulsations, and the reduction in average exposure from a coincidental, contemporaneous change in the LAT's sky-survey observing pattern. The pulsar's sky position is coincident with the spatially extended TeV source HESS J1841-055 detected by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). The inferred energetics suggest that HESS J1841-055 contains a pulsar wind nebula powered by the pulsar.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012 · The Astrophysical Journal Letters
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We used optical images taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in the B and V bands to search for the optical counterpart of PSR J1028-5819 or constrain its optical brightness. At the same time, we used an archival Suzaku observation to confirm the preliminary identification of the pulsar's X-ray counterpart obtained by Swift. Due to the large uncertainty on the pulsar's radio position and the presence of a bright (V = 13.2) early F-type star at < 4", we could not detect its counterpart down to flux limits of B~25.4 and V ~25.3, the deepest obtained so far for PSR J1028-5819. From the Suzaku observations, we found that the X-ray spectrum of the pulsar's candidate counterpart is best-fit by a power-law with spectral index 1.7 +/- 0.2 and an absorption column density NH < 10^21 cm-2, which would support the proposed X-ray identification. Moreover, we found possible evidence for the presence of diffuse emission around the pulsar. If real, and associated with a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), its surface brightness and angular extent would be compatible with the expectations for a ~100 kyr old pulsar at the PSR J1028-5819 distance.
    Full-text · Article · May 2012 · Astronomy and Astrophysics

Publication Stats

3k Citations
468.01 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Stanford University
      • Department of Physics
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 2012
    • Leibniz Universität Hannover
      Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 2010-2012
    • Università degli Studi dell'Insubria
      Varese, Lombardy, Italy
    • Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Istituto Universitario di Studi Superiori di Pavia
      Ticinum, Lombardy, Italy
  • 2009-2010
    • The Ohio State University
      • Department of Physics
      Columbus, Ohio, United States