Zee-Yong Park

Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, Gwangju, South Korea

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Publications (40)166.75 Total impact

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    Se Hwan Jang · Chang-Duk Jun · Zee-Yong Park
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    ABSTRACT: Transgelin2, one of cytoskeletal actin binding proteins has recently been suggested to be involved in the formation of immune synapses. Although detailed function of transgelin2 is largely unknown, interactions between transgelin2 and actin appear to be important in regulating cellular functions of transgelin2. Because protein phosphorylation can change ability to interact with other proteins, comprehensive phosphorylation analysis of transgelin2 will be helpful in understanding its functional mechanisms. Here, a specific protein label-free quantitative phosphorylation analysis method combining immuno-precipitation, IMAC phosphopeptide enrichment technique and label-free relative quantification analysis was used to monitor the phosphorylation changes of transgelin2 overexpressed in Jurkat T cells under protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) activation conditions, two representative intracellular signalling pathways of immune cell activation and homeostasis. A total of six serine/threonine phosphorylation sites were identified including threonine-84, a novel phosphorylation site. Notably, distinct phosphorylation patterns of transgelin2 under the two kinase activation conditions were observed. Most phosphorylation sites showing specific kinase-dependent phosphorylation changes were discretely located in two previously characterized actin-binding regions: actin-binding site (ABS) and calponin repeat domain (CNR). PKC activation increased phosphorylation of threonine-180 and serine-185 in the CNR, and PKA activation increased phosphorylation of serine-163 in the ABS. Multiple actin-binding regions of transgelin2 participate to accomplish its full actin-binding capability, and the actin-binding affinity of each actin-binding region appears to be modulated by specific kinase-dependent phosphorylation changes. Accordingly, different actin-binding properties or cellular functions of transgelin2 may result from distinct intracellular signalling events under immune response activation or homeostasis conditions.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Proteome Science
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    ABSTRACT: Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Moleculer Cells
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    ABSTRACT: Organisms must be able to respond to low oxygen in a number of homeostatic and pathological contexts. Regulation of hypoxic responses via the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is well established, but evidence indicates that other, HIF-independent mechanisms are also involved. Here, we report a hypoxic response that depends on the accumulation of lactate, a metabolite whose production increases in hypoxic conditions. We find that the NDRG3 protein is degraded in a PHD2/VHL-dependent manner in normoxia but is protected from destruction by binding to lactate that accumulates under hypoxia. The stabilized NDRG3 protein binds c-Raf to mediate hypoxia-induced activation of Raf-ERK pathway, promoting angiogenesis and cell growth. Inhibiting cellular lactate production abolishes the NDRG3-mediated hypoxia responses. Our study, therefore, elucidates the molecular basis for lactate-induced hypoxia signaling, which can be exploited for the development of therapies targeting hypoxia-induced diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Cell
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    ABSTRACT: The formation of an immunological synapse (IS) requires tight regulation of actin dynamics by many actin polymerizing/depolymerizing proteins. However, the significance of actin stabilization at the IS remains largely unknown. In this paper, we identify a novel function of TAGLN2-an actin-binding protein predominantly expressed in T cells-in stabilizing cortical F-actin, thereby maintaining F-actin contents at the IS and acquiring LFA-1 (leukocyte function-associated antigen-1) activation after T cell receptor stimulation. TAGLN2 blocks actin depolymerization and competes with cofilin both in vitro and in vivo. Knockout of TAGLN2 (TAGLN2(-/-)) reduced F-actin content and destabilized F-actin ring formation, resulting in decreased cell adhesion and spreading. TAGLN2(-/-) T cells displayed weakened cytokine production and cytotoxic effector function. These findings reveal a novel function of TAGLN2 in enhancing T cell responses by controlling actin stability at the IS. © 2015 Na et al.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · The Journal of Cell Biology
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    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · International Immunopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Autoreactive T-cell responses have a crucial role in the pathology and clinical course of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, controlling the activation of these cells is an important strategy for developing therapies and therapeutics. Here, we identified that 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde (4H3MC) has a therapeutic potential for T-cell activation by modulating protein kinase C-θ (PKCθ) and its downstream pathways. Pre- and post-treatment with 4H3MC prevented IL-2 release from human transformed and untransformed T cells at the micromolar concentrations without any cytotoxic effects, in fact more efficiently than its structural analogue 4-hydroxycinnamic acid-a previously reported T-cell inhibitor. In silico analysis showed that 4H3MC is a potential inhibitor of PKC isotypes, including PKCθ-a crucial PKC isotype in T cells. Consistently, 4H3MC significantly blocked PKC activity in vitro and also inhibited the phosphorylation of PKCθ in T cells. 4H3MC had no effect on TCR-mediated membrane-proximal-signalling events such as phosphorylation of Zap70. Instead, it attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK and p38) and promoter activities of NF-κB, AP-1 and NFAT. Taken together, our results provide the evidences that 4H3MC may have curative potential as a novel immune modulator in a broad range of immunopathological disorders by modulating PKCθ activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · International Immunopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) plays an important role in antiviral immunity as a cytosolic receptor recognizing invading viruses. The activation of downstream signaling pathways led by IFN-β promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1), an adaptor, is known to culminate in the activation of IRFs and the expression of type I interferons. However, the role of Src-family-tyrosine kinases (STKs) in the RIG-I signaling pathway has not been fully evaluated. Through a combined approach of immunoprecipitation and micro reversed phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-MS/MS) analysis, we established that Lyn, one of the STKs, is associated with RIG-I in macrophages. The association of Lyn and RIG-I was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation study with 293T cells overexpressing Lyn and RIG-I. Suppression of Lyn by siRNA knockdown or a pharmacological inhibitor (PP2) resulted in the attenuation of IRF3 activation and IFN-β expression induced by short poly I:C, a RIG-I agonist, in macrophages. Lyn activation, as determined by phosphorylation of Tyr396 residue, was observed upon short poly I:C stimulation in the mitochondria of macrophages. Short poly I:C induced the formation of speckle-like aggregates of Lyn, which are prominent in mitochondria. Lyn associated with IPS-1, an adaptor protein of RIG-I, which resides on mitochondria membrane. Helicase domain of RIG-I and CARD of IPS-1 are responsible for the interaction with Lyn while SH3 and SH2 domains in Lyn are required for the association with RIG-I and IPS-1. Collectively, our results indicate that Lyn plays a positive regulatory role in RIG-I-mediated interferon expression as a downstream component of IPS-1. They provide further information as to how tyrosine kinases such as STKs play a role in the regulation of antiviral immunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Cytokine
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and methods: After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Conclusion: Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2014 · BioMed Research International
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    ABSTRACT: To identify ligands for orphan GPCRs, we searched novel neuropeptide genes in the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Here, we describe CNMa, a novel cyclic neuropeptide that is a highly potent and selective agonist for the orphan GPCR, CG33696 (CNMaR). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that arthropod species have two paralogous CNMaRs, but many taxa retain only one. Drosophila CNMa potently activates CNMaR-2 from Apis mellifera, suggesting both receptors are functional. Although CNMa is conserved in most arthropods, Lepidoptera lack the CNMa gene. However, they retain the CNMaR gene. Bombyx CNMaR showed low sensitivity to Drosophila CNMa, hinting toward the existence of additional CNMaR ligand(s).
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · FEBS letters
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    ABSTRACT: Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight disease in rice, and that severely affects yield loss (upto 50%) of total rice production. Here, we report a proteomics investigation of Xoo (compatible race K3)-secreted proteins, isolated from its in vitro culture and in planta infected rice leaves. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS and/or nLC-ESI-MS/MS approach identified 139 protein spots (out of 153 differential spots), encoding 109 unique proteins. Identified proteins belonged to multiple biological and molecular functions. Metabolic and nutrient uptake proteins were common up to both in vitro and in planta secretomes. However, pathogenicity, protease/peptidase, and host defense-related proteins were highly- or specifically-expressed during in planta infection. A good correlation was observed between protein and transcript abundances for nine proteins-secreted in planta as per semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Transgenic rice leaf sheath (carrying PBZ1 promoter::GFP cell death reporter), when used to express a few of the identified secretory proteins, showed a direct activation of cell death signaling, suggesting their involvement in pathogenicity-related with secretion effectors. This work furthers our understanding of rice bacterial blight disease, and serves as a resource for possible translation in generating disease resistant rice plants for improved seed yield.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · Proteomics
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    Jung Eun Koo · Zee-Yong Park · Nam Doo Kim · Joo Young Lee
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    ABSTRACT: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern-recognition receptors that recognize invading pathogens and non-microbial endogenous molecules to induce innate and adaptive immune responses. Since activation of TLRs is deeply implicated in the pathological progress of autoimmune diseases, sepsis, metabolic diseases, and cancer, modulation of TLR activity is considered one of the most important therapeutic approaches. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin of gram-negative bacteria, is a well-known agonist for TLR4 triggering inflammation and septic shock. LPS interacts with TLR4 through binding to a hydrophobic pocket in myeloid differentiation 2 (MD2), a co-receptor of TLR4. In this study, we showed that sulforaphane (SFN) interfered with the binding of LPS to MD2 as determined by in vitro binding assay and co-immunoprecipitation of MD2 and LPS in a cell system. The inhibitory effect of SFN on the interaction of LPS and MD2 was reversed by thiol supplementation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dithiothreitol showing that the inhibitory effect of SFN is dependent on its thiol-modifying activity. Indeed, micro LC-MS/MS analysis showed that SFN preferentially formed adducts with Cys133 in the hydrophobic pocket of MD2, but not with Cys95 and Cys105. Molecular modeling showed that SFN bound to Cys133 blocks the engagement of LPS and lipid IVa to hydrophobic pocket of MD2. Our results demonstrate that SFN interrupts LPS engagement to TLR4/MD2 complex by direct binding to Cys133 in MD2. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of SFN, and provide a novel target for the regulation of TLR4-mediated inflammatory and immune responses by phytochemicals.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purpose: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in recognizing invading pathogens and endogenous danger signal to induce immune and inflammatory responses. Since dysregulation of TLRs enhances the risk of immune disorders and chronic inflammatory diseases, modulation of TLR activity by phytochemicals could be useful therapeutically. We investigated the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on TLR-mediated inflammation and the underlying regulatory mechanism. Experimental approach: Inhibitory effects of CAPE on TLR4 activation were assessed with in vivo murine skin inflammation model and in vitro production of inflammatory mediators in macrophages. In vitro binding assay, cell-based immunoprecipitation study and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis were performed to determine lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding to MD2 and to identify the direct binding site of CAPE in MD2. Key results: Topical application of CAPE attenuated dermal inflammation and oedema induced by intradermal injection of LPS (a TLR4 agonist). CAPE suppressed production of inflammatory mediators and activation of NFκB and interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in macrophages stimulated with LPS. CAPE interrupted LPS binding to MD2 through formation of adduct specifically with Cys133 located in hydrophobic pocket of MD2. The inhibitory effect on LPS-induced IRF3 activation by CAPE was not observed when 293T cells were reconstituted with MD2 (C133S) mutant. Conclusions and implications: Our results show a novel mechanism for anti-inflammatory activity of CAPE to prevent TLR4 activation by interfering with interaction between ligand (LPS) and receptor complex (TLR4/MD2). These further provide beneficial information for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent chronic inflammatory diseases.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2012 · British Journal of Pharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: The in vivo apoplastic fluid secretome of rice-blast fungus interaction remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we report a proteomics investigation of in vivo secreted proteins of rice leaves infected with incompatible (KJ401) and compatible (KJ301) races of Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae) using 2-DGE and MudPIT coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS and/or nESI-LC-MS/MS analyses. Prepared fractions of secretory proteins were essentially free from cytoplasmic contamination. Two-DGE and MudPIT identified 732 secretory proteins, where 291 (40%) and 441 (60%) proteins were derived from rice and M. oryzae, respectively. Of these, 39.2% (rice) and 38.9% (M. oryzae) of proteins were predicted by SignalP as retaining signal peptides. Among these, rice secreted more proteins related to stress response, ROS and energy metabolism, whereas, M. oryzae secreted more proteins involved in metabolism and cell wall hydrolyses. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed their differential expression under compatible/incompatible interactions. In vivo expression of M. oryzae glycosyl hydrolase (GH) protein family members using particle bombardment driven transient expression system showed that four GH genes could act as effectors within host apoplast possibly via interaction with host membrane bound receptor. The established in vivo secretome serves as a valuable resource toward secretome analysis of rice-M. oryzae interaction.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2012 · Journal of proteomics
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    ABSTRACT: Ninjurin1 is known as an adhesion molecule promoting leukocyte trafficking under inflammatory conditions. However, the posttranslational modifications of Ninjurin1 are poorly understood. Herein, we defined the proteolytic cleavage of Ninjurin1 and its functions. HEK293T cells overexpressing the C- or N-terminus tagging mouse Ninjurin1 plasmid produced additional cleaved forms of Ninjurin1 in the lysates or conditioned media (CM). Two custom-made anti-Ninjurin1 antibodies, Ab(1-15) or Ab(139-152), specific to the N- or C-terminal regions of Ninjurin1 revealed the presence of its shedding fragments in the mouse liver and kidney lysates. Furthermore, Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 was responsible for Ninjurin1 cleavage between Leu(56) and Leu(57). Interestingly, the soluble N-terminal Ninjurin1 fragment has structural similarity with well-known chemokines. Indeed, the CM from HEK293T cells overexpressing the GFP-mNinj1 plasmid was able to attract Raw264.7 cells in trans-well assay. Collectively, we suggest that the N-terminal ectodomain of mouse Ninjurin1, which may act as a chemoattractant, is cleaved by MMP9.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
  • Hyekyeong Kwon · Jang-Soo Chun · Zee-Yong Park · Dong-Yu Kim
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    ABSTRACT: The mammalian heart is a muscular organ that can adjust dynamic alterations in its workload. In response to physiological or pathological stimuli and development, the heart changes hypertrophic enlargement which increase in the size of individual cardiac myocytes. A comparative proteomic survey is needed to acquire systemic insights into mammalian cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, using a shotgun proteomics approach based on MudPIT and tandem mass spectrometry, we have gained global protein profiling for each of pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy models and applied a statistical method by normalization of spectral counts. We analyzed relative protein expression abundance and studied their biological functions with bioinformatics tools. Interestingly, between physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy there were little overlap in the expression profiles. More specifically, there was a significant, negative correlation in biological functions of two models. Thus, different models of pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy are associated with distinct proteins controlled each signaling pathway. These data demonstrate key biological functions which describe each type of cardiac hypertrophy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012
  • Hyunwoo Choi · Sungjoon Lee · Chang-Duk Jun · Zee-Yong Park
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    ABSTRACT: Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and metal oxide type affinity chromatography (MOAC) techniques have been widely used for mass spectrometry-based phosphorylation analysis. Unlike MOAC techniques, IMAC requires rather complete removals of buffering reagents, salts and high concentrations of denaturant prior to sample loading in order for the successful enrichment of phosphopeptides. In this study, a simple off-line capillary column-based IMAC phosphopeptide enrichment method can shorten sample preparation time by eliminating the speed-vac step from the desalting process. Tryptic digest peptide samples containing 2M urea can be directly processed and the entire IMAC procedure can be completed within 6 h. When tryptic digest peptide samples prepared from mouse whole brain tissues were analyzed using our method, an average of 249 phosphoproteins and 463 unique phosphopeptides were identified from single 2-h RPLC-MS/MS analysis (~88% specificity). An additional advantage of this method is the significantly improved reproducibility of the phosphopeptide enrichment results. When four independent phosphopeptide enrichment experiments were carried out, the peak areas of phosphopeptides identified among four enrichment experiments were relatively similar (less than 16.2% relative standard dev.). Because of this increased reproducibility, relative phosphorylation quantification analysis of major phosphoproteins appears to be feasible without the need for stable isotope labeling techniques.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2011 · Journal of chromatography. B, Analytical technologies in the biomedical and life sciences
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    ABSTRACT: The filipin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces avermitilis contains pteB, a homolog of crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase. PteB was predicted to be 2-octenoyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, supplying hexylmalonyl-CoA to filipin biosynthesis. Recombinant PteB displayed selective reductase activity toward 2-octenoyl-CoA while generating a broad range of alkylmalonyl-CoAs in the presence of bicarbonate.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Transmembrane 4 L six family member 5 (TM4SF5) is highly expressed in hepatocarcinoma and causes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of hepatocytes. We found that TM4SF5-expressing cells showed lower mRNA levels but maintained normal protein levels in certain gene cases, indicating that TM4SF5 mediates stabilization of proteins. In this study, we explored whether regulation of proteasome activity and TM4SF5 expression led to EMT. We observed that TM4SF5 expression caused inhibition of proteasome activity and proteasome subunit expression, causing morphological changes and loss of cell-cell contacts. shRNA against TM4SF5 recovered proteasome expression, with leading to blockade of proteasome inactivation and EMT. Altogether, TM4SF5 expression appeared to cause loss of cell-cell adhesions via proteasome suppression and thereby proteasome inhibition, leading to repression of cell-cell adhesion molecules, such as E-cadherin.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Journal of Cellular Biochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF) is an adaptor molecule that is recruited to TLR3 and -4 upon agonist stimulation and triggers activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and expression of type 1 IFNs, which are critical for cellular antiviral responses. We show that Akt is a downstream molecule of TRIF/TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and plays an important role in the activation of IRF3 by TLR3 and -4 agonists. Blockade of Akt by a dominant-negative mutant or by short interfering RNA decreased IRF3 activation and IFN-β expression induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)], LPS, TRIF, and TBK1. Association of endogenous TBK1 and Akt was observed in macrophages when stimulated with poly(I:C) and LPS. In vitro kinase assays combined with reversed-phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis showed that TBK1 enhanced phosphorylation of Akt on Ser(473), whereas knockdown of TBK1 expression by short interfering RNA in macrophages decreased poly(I:C)- and LPS-induced Akt phosphorylation. Embryonic fibroblasts derived from TBK1 knockout mice also showed impaired Akt phosphorylation in response to poly(I:C) and LPS. To our knowledge, our results demonstrate a new regulatory mechanism for Akt activation mediated by TBK1 and a novel role of Akt in TLR-mediated immune responses.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2011 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: In plants, plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular channels that function in both metabolite exchange and the transport of proteins and RNAs. Currently, many of the PD structural and regulatory components remain to be elucidated. Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) belonging to a notably expanded protein family in plants compared to the animal kingdom have been shown to play important roles in plant growth, development, pathogen resistance, and cell death. In this study, cell biological approaches were used to identify potential PD-associated RLK proteins among proteins contained within cell walls isolated from rice callus cultured cells. A total of 15 rice RLKs were investigated to determine their subcellular localization, using an Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system. Of these six PD-associated RLKs were identified based on their co-localization with a viral movement protein that served as a PD marker, plasmolysis experiments, and subcellular localization at points of wall contact between spongy mesophyll cells. These findings suggest potential PD functions in apoplasmic signaling in response to environmental stimuli and developmental inputs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00709-010-0251-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · Protoplasma

Publication Stats

726 Citations
166.75 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005-2015
    • Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology
      • Department of Life Sciences
      Gwangju, Gwangju, South Korea
  • 2009
    • Gyeongsang National University
      • Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center
      Chinju, South Gyeongsang, South Korea
  • 2004
    • The Scripps Research Institute
      La Jolla, California, United States