Jingsheng He

Wuhan University, Wu-han-shih, Hubei, China

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Publications (23)51.57 Total impact

  • Bingxin Ma · Jing Tong · Gao Zhou · Qigui Mo · Jingsheng He · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Coptis chinensis inflorescence is rich in isoquinoline alkaloids, especially berberine; these alkaloids comprise a chemical group with anti-hyperglycaemic effect. This study mainly investigated the α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of C. chinensis inflorescence extract (CE). The effect of CE was similar to that of acarbose. Results of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte assay showed that CE can increase glucose consumption. In addition, CE and its main alkaloids (jatrorrhizine, columbamine, epiberberine, coptisine, palmatine, and berberine) were used to ameliorate streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Anti-hyperglycaemic activity was realised by reducing the blood glucose level and increasing the insulin content. Furthermore, CE and its main alkaloids can relieve liver injury and lipid metabolic disturbance. Therefore, CE exerts anti-hyperglycaemic activity, and alkaloids may be an active compound group. Overall, the results provide scientific foundation for C. chinensis inflorescence as functional food to ameliorate hyperglycaemia.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2016
  • Bingxin Ma · Jing Wang · Jing Tong · Gao Zhou · Yuxin Chen · Jingsheng He · Y. Wang

    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Food & Function
  • Jing Tong · Bingxin Ma · Lanlan Ge · Qigui Mo · Gao Zhou · Jingsheng He · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Chicory has a major geographical presence in Europe and Asia. Cichorium glandulosum Boiss. et Huet, a genus Cichorium, is used for medicinal and food purposes in Asia. In this study, a dicaffeoylquinic acid-enriched fraction of C. glandulosum seeds n-BuOH fraction (CGSB) could ameliorate type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in STZ-induced diabetic mice with continuous administration for two weeks. CGSB treatment showed significantly higher plasma insulin levels but lower free fatty acids in adipose tissue and liver. Moreover, CGSB improved pancreatic islet mass. In vitro, different fractions of C. glandulosum seed (CGS) induced the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The mRNA level for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha increased in high glucose treatment group in HepG2 cells, while CGSB significantly down-regulated the mRNA expression. The main compound of CGSB, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid was isolated and identified, which exhibited α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. These findings demonstrated that CGSB attenuated experimental T1DM via multi-pathway protection.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
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    Jun Tian · Bo Huang · Xiuli Luo · Hong Zeng · Xiaoquan Ban · Jingsheng He · Youwei Wang

    Full-text · Dataset · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dill (Anethum graveolens L.) seed essential oil against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and its mechanism of action. The antifungal activities of the two main constituents, namely carvone and limonene, were also measured. Mycelial growth and sclerotial germination were thoroughly inhibited by dill seed essential oil at the 1.00 μL/mL under contact condition and 0.125μL/mL air under vapor condition. Carvone also contributed more than limonene in inhibiting the growth of S. sclerotiorum. Carvone and limonene synergistically inhibited the growth of the fungus. In vivo experiments, the essential oil remarkably suppressed S. sclerotiorum, and considerable morphological alterations were observed in the hyphae and sclerotia. Inhibition of ergosterol synthesis, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase activities, and external medium acidification were investigated to elucidate the antifungal mechanism of the essential oil. The seed essential oil of A. graveolens can be extensively used in agriculture for preventing the oilseed crops fungal disease.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    Jun Tian · Bo Huang · Xiuli Luo · Hong Zeng · Xiaoquan Ban · Jingsheng He · Youwei Wang

    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was performed to evaluate genetic relationships among 52 Chaenomeles speciosa accessions grown in China. A total of 208 polymorphic markers were generated from eight selective primer pair combinations. Genetic variations were remarkably observed in a wide range of dissimilarities, percent polymorphisms, and average polymorphism information. Genetic similarity values were calculated using Jaccard's coefficient between individuals of different flowering quince accessions; these values ranged from 0.296 to 0.931 with a mean of 0.597. Cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis were then performed on the basis of AFLP profiles. In our generated dendrogram, accessions were clustered into seven major groups. Mantel's test was performed to determine cophenetic correlation (r = 0.9); this result indicated a very good fit of the dendrogram. We conducted analysis of molecular variance and found greater variations within cultivars than among cultivars. AFLP analysis results further revealed relevant information regarding the genetic background of flowering quince accessions essential for future breeding programs related to plant improvement.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Biochemical Systematics and Ecology
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    Bo Huang · Yuxin Chen · Bingxin Ma · Gao Zhou · Jing Tong · Jingsheng He · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Cichorium glandulosum Boiss. et Huet, a common herb for treating hepatitis, is indigenous to Europe, Western Asia, and the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. This study aims at evaluating the protective activity of different extracts from C. glandulosum seeds against experimental oxidation- and ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage in rat liver mitochondria. The antioxidant property of different extracts from C. glandulosum seeds was investigated by employing various established in vitro systems, such as α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), and reducing power assay. The protective effects of different C. glandulosum seed extracts against UVB-induced phototoxicity in a mitochondria model were also evaluated by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, glutathione, lipid hydroperoxide, conjugated diene, and 4-hydroxynonenal. The main compounds in C. glandulosum seeds were identified by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that C. glandulosum seed extracts have strong antioxidant activity, in which the ethyl acetate extract (EE) and n-butanol extract (BE) showed better activity than other extracts. In a UVB-induced mitochondria model, both EE and BE have better antioxidant activity and protective effects against phototoxicity than the petroleum ether extract, chloroform extract, and water extract. The differences in antioxidant activity and photoprotective capacity among these five extracts are associated with their phenolic compound content. Therefore, research on this function of C. glandulosum seeds may broaden their applications in the food and medical industry.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014
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    Jun Tian · Yuxin Chen · Bingxin Ma · Jingsheng He · Jing Tong · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Drosera peltata Smith var. lunata (Buch.-Ham.) C. B. Clarke (DPVL) fractions and plumbagin were tested via broth microdilution techniques on Rhizopus oryzae, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae, Penicillium citrinum. All of the test substances [petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol fraction and aqueous residue (AR)] except for the AR were active against all the tested strains. The petroleum ether fraction (PEF) was the most active (MIC = 5.86-46.88 μg/ml, MFC = 23.44-93.75 μg/ml) of the five tested substances and therefore, was selected for further analysis. Based on antifungal activity, bioactivity-guided fractionation of the PEF led to the isolation of plumbagin. The structure of plumbagin was elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR. Using HPLC, DPVL was found to be a new source of plumbagin. Reversed-phase HPLC was performed using a mobile phase of water and methanol, and peaks were detected at 254 nm. Plumbagin showed a good linear relationship at concentrations ranging from 0.625 to 10 μg/ml. Both the intraday and the interday precision showed that the method was precise, with RSDs of at least 3 % at different concentrations. Recovery rates ranging from 97.86 to 99.94 % were observed, which indicate that the method is accurate. The specificity of the method was established by checking the peak purity of plumbagin. For six independent measurements, the average plumbagin content in DPVL was 11.05 ± 0.31 mg/g of dried material. The validated HPLC method provides a new basis for assessing DPVL quality.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology (Formerly MIRCEN Journal of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology)
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    Ling Zhu · Bo Huang · Xiaoquan Ban · Jingsheng He · Yuxin Chen · Li Han · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Cultivated Coptis chinensis inflorescence has been highly valued in Chinese tea production for many years. The main alkaloid compounds in C. chinensis inflorescence ethanolic extracts (CE) were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The detected compounds included jatrorrhizine (4.87 mg/g), coptisine (17.18 mg/g), palmatine (3.32 mg/g), and berberine (31.81 mg/g), as well as columbamine and epiberberine (tentatively identified). CE protective activity against ultraviolet-B (UVB)-induced phototoxicity in a mitochondria model was determined by measuring thiobarbituric acid-reactive substrates, lipid hydroperoxide, conjugated diene, 4-hydroxynonenal, and glutathione. The results showed that CE excellently inhibited UVB-induced lipid peroxidation and glutathione reduction in vitro. This photoprotective effect of CE may be caused by the presence of the abovementioned alkaloid compounds and phenolic compounds that enhances CE antioxidant activity. Therefore, CE possesses potent photoprotective property that may find valuable applications in food industries and in anti-phototoxicity formulations.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association
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    Jingsheng He · Bo Huang · Xiaoquan Ban · Jun Tian · Ling Zhu · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Meconopsis quintuplinervia, a medicinal herb endemic to the Tibetan region, is used to treat hepatitis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the antioxidant potential of the ethanolic extract of this herb using different assays. The antioxidant capacity of Meconopsis quintuplinervia was investigated using various established in vitro systems. An in vivo study of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced antioxidant activity in mice was also conducted by examining the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione (GSH). The extract showed strong in vitro antioxidant ability. In the in vivo study, CCl(4)-induced oxidative stress caused significant decreases in the SOD, CAT, and GSH levels and a significant increase in the MDA level, most of which were significantly reversed (except for SOD in the liver.) by treatment with the extract and standard Vitamin E. This study clearly indicates that the ethanolic extract of Meconopsis quintuplinervia is a valuable source of natural antioxidants. These findings provide scientific support for the traditional use of this herb as a Tibetan medicine for liver diseases.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    Jun Tian · Bo Huang · Xiuli Luo · Hong Zeng · Xiaoquan Ban · Jingsheng He · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: The essential oil extracted from the bark of Cinnamomum jensenianum Hand.-Mazz was tested for antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus. Fifty-five components accounting for 96.66% of the total oil composition were identified by GC–MS. The major components were eucalyptol (17.26%) and α-terpineol (12.52%). Mycelial growth and spore germination was inhibited by the oil in a dose-dependent manner. The oil also exhibited a noticeable inhibition on the dry mycelium weight and the synthesis of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) by A. flavus, completely restraining AFB1 production at 6 μl/ml. The possible mode of action of the oil against A. flavus is discussed based on changes in the mycelial ultrastructure. To confirm the target of the oil in the plasma membrane, studies on the inhibition of ergosterol synthesis were performed. Results show that the oil caused a considerable reduction in the ergosterol quantity. Thus, the essential oil from C. jensenianum can be used as a potential source for food preservative.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · Food Chemistry
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    Jun Tian · Xiaoquan Ban · Hong Zeng · Jingsheng He · Yuxin Chen · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: The essential oil extracted from the seeds of dill (Anethum graveolens L.) was demonstrated in this study as a potential source of an eco-friendly antifungal agent. To elucidate the mechanism of the antifungal action further, the effect of the essential oil on the plasma membrane and mitochondria of Aspergillus flavus was investigated. The lesion in the plasma membrane was detected through flow cytometry and further verified through the inhibition of ergosterol synthesis. The essential oil caused morphological changes in the cells of A. flavus and a reduction in the ergosterol quantity. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), acidification of external medium, and mitochondrial ATPase and dehydrogenase activities were detected. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation was also examined through fluorometric assay. Exposure to dill oil resulted in an elevation of MMP, and in the suppression of the glucose-induced decrease in external pH at 4 µl/ml. Decreased ATPase and dehydrogenase activities in A. flavus cells were also observed in a dose-dependent manner. The above dysfunctions of the mitochondria caused ROS accumulation in A. flavus. A reduction in cell viability was prevented through the addition of L-cysteine, which indicates that ROS is an important mediator of the antifungal action of dill oil. In summary, the antifungal activity of dill oil results from its ability to disrupt the permeability barrier of the plasma membrane and from the mitochondrial dysfunction-induced ROS accumulation in A. flavus.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · PLoS ONE
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    Jun Tian · Xiaoquan Ban · Hong Zeng · Bo Huang · Jingsheng He · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of present study were to determine the antifungal activity in vitro of the essential oil extracted from the seeds of dill (Anethum graveolens L.) and to evaluate its antifungal activity in vivo as a potential food preservative. The antifungal activity of this oil was tested by poisoned food technique against Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger and Alternaria alternata. The wet and dry mycelium weight of the tested fungi was also determined in a liquid culture to evaluate the antifungal activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration of oil for the four tested fungi was found to be 2.0 μl/ml, and the mycelial growth inhibition was determined at day 9. Observations on the microstructure of A. niger using light and scanning electron microscopes revealed degenerative alterations in the conidial heads and hyphal morphology after oil treatment, including distorted conidial heads, decreased hyphal diameters, shriveled hyphal aggregates, and swelling of the hyphal wall. The effect of the essential oil on inhibition of decay development on cherry tomatoes was tested in vivo by exposing inoculated and control fruit to essential oil vapor at 120 μl/ml and 100 μl/ml concentrations, respectively. Thus, the essential oil of dill could be used to control food spoilage as a potential source of food preservative.Highlights► We assessed the effects of dill oil on mycelial growth and the biomass of mycelium. ► We assessed the effects of dill oil on the mycelial morphological and physiological changes of A. niger. ► We assessed the potential application of dill oil to control post harvest spoilage on stored cherry tomatoes.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2011 · Food Control
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    Yue Chen · Bo Huang · Jingsheng He · Li Han · Yichao Zhan · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Swertia chirayita, a medicinal herb endemic to the Tibetan region, is used as a special remedy for liver disorders. The hepatoprotective activity of its plant extracts has been associated with its antioxidant activity. This paper aims to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant effects of Swertia chirayita extracts (SCE). Antioxidant ability of Swertia chirayita was investigated by employing several established in vitro methods. In vivo antioxidant activity was tested against CCl(4)-induced toxicity in mice. The levels and activities of malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione (GSH), were then assayed using standard procedures. SCE exhibited strong antioxidant ability in vitro. The liver and kidney of CCl(4)-intoxicated animals exhibited a significant (p<0.001) decrease in SOD, CAT, and GSH levels. Additionally, these organs exhibited a significant (p<0.001) increase in MDA level. CCl(4) did not exhibit toxicity on mice treated with SCE and Vitamin E. The effects of Swertia chirayita (three dosages) were comparable to those of Vitamin E, except in MDA level in the liver and GSH level in the kidney (p<0.05). This study suggests that the ethanolic extract of Swertia chirayita possesses in vitro and in vivo antioxidant effects. This supports the traditional use of Swertia chirayita in Tibetan medicine to cure liver diseases.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2011 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    Jun Tian · Xiaoquan Ban · Hong Zeng · Jingsheng He · Bo Huang · Youwei Wang

    Full-text · Article · May 2011 · International Journal of Food Microbiology
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    Xiaoquan Ban · Bo Huang · Jingsheng He · Yuxin Chen · Hong Zeng · Li Han · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: The inflorescence of cultivated Coptis chinensis has been valued for tea production for many years in China. The antioxidant activities of C. chinensis inflorescence extracts prepared by various solvents were investigated by using several established in vitro systems: 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS), α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radical scavenging assays, reducing power assay, and ferrothiocyanate (FTC) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assays. The results showed that the 70% ethanol extract (EE) had the strongest antioxidant activity in vitro among the various extracts. Based on the in vitro results, EE was used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of C. chinensis inflorescence in vivo. The liver and kidney of intoxicated animals showed a significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels, while the malondialdehyde (MDA) level showed a significant increase. These changes were significantly reversed after treatment with EE and the standard vitamin E. Thus, the C. chinensis inflorescence may be a valuable natural source that can be applicable to food industries.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2011 · Plant Foods for Human Nutrition
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    Jun Tian · Xiaoquan Ban · Hong Zeng · Jingsheng He · Bo Huang · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: The essential oil extracted from the fruits of Cicuta virosa L. var. latisecta Celak was tested in vitro and in vivo against four foodborne fungi, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger, and Alternaria alternata. Forty-five different components accounting for 98.4% of the total oil composition were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major components were γ-terpinene (40.92%), p-cymene (27.93%), and cumin aldehyde (21.20%). Antifungal activity was tested by the poisoned food technique against the four fungi. Minimum inhibitory concentration against the fungi was 5 μL/mL and percentage inhibition of mycelial growth was determined at day 9. The essential oil had a strong inhibitory effect on spore production and germination in all tested fungi proportional to concentration. The oil exhibited noticeable inhibition on dry mycelium weight and synthesis of aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) by A. flavus, completely inhibiting AFB(1) production at 4 μL/mL. The effect of the essential oil on inhibition of decay development in cherry tomatoes was tested in vivo by exposing inoculated and control fruit to essential oil vapor at a concentration of 200 μL/mL. Results indicated that the essential oil from C. virosa var. latisecta (CVEO) has potential as a preservative to control food spoilage.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2011 · International journal of food microbiology
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    ABSTRACT: Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) is an extensively cultivated vegetable in eastern Asia, particularly in China. Both lotus rhizome knot (LRK) and lotus leaf (LL) are waste products of the lotus industry. Extracts from LRK and LL are proposed as antioxidants for meat. Porcine and bovine ground meat samples were subjected to three treatments: CONTROL (with no additives), LRK (lotus rhizomes knot extract 3% w/w), and LL (lotus leaf extract 3% w/w). Raw and cooked samples were stored at 4°C and the antioxidant activity was determined at 1, 3, 6 and 10 days. Antioxidant activity was significantly increased in all meat samples with the addition of both LRK and LL, but LRK was more effective against lipid oxidation. The results show the potential for using LRK and LL extracts in the meat industry to prolong shelf life.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · Meat Science
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    Bo Huang · Haibin Ke · Jingsheng He · Xiaoquan Ban · Hong Zeng · Youwei Wang
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    ABSTRACT: The antioxidant properties of different extracts of Halenia elliptica was investigated by employing various established in vitro systems. The results showed that various extracts possessed strong antioxidant activity in vitro, and the 70% methanol extract (ME) had the strongest antioxidant activity. Based on our in vitro results, ME was used for investigating the antioxidant properties of H. ellipticain vivo. The liver and kidney of CCl(4)-intoxicated animals exhibited a significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels. Additionally, these organs exhibited a significant increase in the level of malondialdehyde (MDA). These changes were significantly reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, after treatment with ME and the standard treatment Vitamin E. Thus, it may be concluded that the ME possesses potent antioxidant properties, and might be valuable natural source of antioxidants that could be applicable to both the medical and food industries.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2010 · Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association

Publication Stats

517 Citations
51.57 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009-2016
    • Wuhan University
      • • School of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      • • Department of Traditional Chinese and Natural Products Medicine
      Wu-han-shih, Hubei, China
  • 2008
    • Chinese Academy of Sciences
      Peping, Beijing, China