M. Prescott

IT University of Copenhagen, København, Capital Region, Denmark

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Publications (79)262.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ∼286 deg2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238 000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm–1 m. Here, we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release, we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component Sérsic fits, stellar masses, Hα-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72 225 objects in total). The data base serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: The Nilsson et al. (2006) Lyman-alpha nebula has often been cited as the most plausible example of a Lyman-alpha nebula powered by gravitational cooling. In this paper, we bring together new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory as well as comparisons to recent theoretical simulations in order to revisit the questions of the local environment and most likely power source for the Lyman-alpha nebula. In contrast to previous results, we find that this Lyman-alpha nebula is associated with 6 nearby galaxies and an obscured AGN that is offset by $\sim$4"$\approx$30 kpc from the Lyman-alpha peak. The local region is overdense relative to the field, by a factor of $\sim$10, and at low surface brightness levels the Lyman-alpha emission appears to encircle the position of the obscured AGN, highly suggestive of a physical association. At the same time, we confirm that there is no compact continuum source located within $\sim$2-3"$\approx$15-23 kpc of the Lyman-alpha peak. Since the latest cold accretion simulations predict that the brightest Lyman-alpha emission will be coincident with a central growing galaxy, we conclude that this is actually a strong argument against, rather than for, the idea that the nebula is gravitationally-powered. While we may be seeing gas within cosmic filaments, this gas is primarily being lit up, not by gravitational energy, but due to illumination from a nearby buried AGN.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    Moire K. M. Prescott · Crystal L. Martin · Arjun Dey
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    ABSTRACT: We use spatially extended measurements of Ly$\alpha$ as well as less optically thick emission lines from an $\approx$80 kpc Ly$\alpha$ nebula at $z\approx1.67$ to assess the role of resonant scattering and to disentangle kinematic signatures from Ly$\alpha$ radiative transfer effects. We find that the Ly$\alpha$, CIV, HeII, and CIII] emission lines all tell a similar story in this system, and that the kinematics are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation. First, the observed surface brightness profiles are similar in extent in all four lines, strongly favoring a picture in which the Ly$\alpha$ photons are produced in situ instead of being resonantly scattered from a central source. Second, we see low kinematic offsets between Ly$\alpha$ and the less optically thick HeII line ($\sim$100-200 km s$^{-1}$), providing further support for the argument that the Ly$\alpha$ and other emission lines are all being produced within the spatially extended gas. Finally, the full velocity field of the system shows coherent velocity shear in all emission lines: $\approx$500 km s$^{-1}$ over the central $\approx$50 kpc of the nebula. The kinematic profiles are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation in a gas disk that is at least partially stable against collapse. These observations suggest that the Ly$\alpha$ nebula represents accreting material that is illuminated by an offset, hidden AGN or distributed star formation, and that is undergoing rotation in a clumpy and turbulent gas disk. With an implied mass of M(<R=20 kpc)$\sim3\times10^{11}$ $M_{\odot}$, this system may represent the early formation of a large Milky Way mass galaxy or galaxy group.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We use 10 387 galaxies from the Herschel Astrophysical TeraHertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) to probe the far-infrared radio correlation (FIRC) of star-forming galaxies as a function of redshift, wavelength, and effective dust temperature. All of the sources in our 250 μm-selected sample have spectroscopic redshifts, as well as 1.4 GHz flux density estimates measured from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimetres (FIRST) survey. This enables us to study not only individual sources, but also the average properties of the 250 μm-selected population using median stacking techniques. We find that individual sources detected at ≥5σ in both the H-ATLAS and FIRST data have logarithmic flux ratios (i.e. FIRC qλ parameters) consistent with previous studies of the FIRC. In contrast, the stacked values show larger qλ, suggesting excess far-IR flux density/luminosity in 250 μm-selected sources above what has been seen in previous analyses. In addition, we find evidence that 250 μm sources with warm dust spectral energy distributions have a larger 1.4 GHz luminosity than the cooler sources in our sample. Though we find no evidence for redshift evolution of the monochromatic FIRC, our analysis reveals significant temperature dependence. Whilst the FIRC is reasonably constant with temperature at 100 μm, we find increasing inverse correlation with temperature as we probe longer PACS and SPIRE wavelengths. These results may have important implications for the use of monochromatic dust luminosity as a star formation rate indicator in star-forming galaxies, and in the future, for using radio data to determine galaxy star formation rates.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2014
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    ABSTRACT: We use a highly complete subset of the GAMA-II redshift sample to fully describe the stellar mass dependence of close-pairs and mergers between 10^8 Msun and 10^12 Msun. Using the analytic form of this fit we investigate the total stellar mass accreting onto more massive galaxies across all mass ratios. Depending on how conservatively we select our robust merging systems, the fraction of mass merging onto more massive companions is 2.0%-5.6%. Using the GAMA-II data we see no significant evidence for a change in the close-pair fraction between redshift $z = 0.05-0.2$. However, we find a systematically higher fraction of galaxies in similar mass close-pairs compared to published results over a similar redshift baseline. Using a compendium of data and the function $\gamma_M =A(1+z)m$ to predict the major close-pair fraction, we find fitting parameters of $A = 0.021 \pm 0.001$ and $m = 1.53 \pm 0.08$, which represents a higher low-redshift normalisation and shallower power-law slope than recent literature values. We find that the relative importance of in-situ star-formation versus galaxy merging is inversely correlated, with star-formation dominating the addition of stellar material below Mstar and merger accretion events dominating beyond Mstar. We find mergers have a measurable impact on the whole extent of the GSMF, manifest as a deepening of the dip in the GSMF over the next Gyr and an increase in Mstar by as much as 0.01-0.05 dex.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: We present IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer observations of the CO(3-2) and CO(5-4) line transitions from an Lyα blob at z ~ 2.7 in order to investigate the gas kinematics, determine the location of the dominant energy source, and study the physical conditions of the molecular gas. CO line and dust continuum emissions are detected at the location of a strong MIPS source that is offset by ~15 from the Lyα peak. Neither of these emission components is resolved with the 17 beam, showing that the gas and dust are confined to within ~7 kpc from this galaxy. No millimeter source is found at the location of the Lyα peak, ruling out a central compact source of star formation as the power source for the Lyα emission. Combined with a spatially resolved spectrum of Lyα and He II, we constrain the kinematics of the extended gas using the CO emission as a tracer of the systemic redshift. Near the MIPS source, the Lyα profile is symmetric, and its line center agrees with that of the CO line, implying that there are no significant bulk flows and that the photo-ionization from the MIPS source might be the dominant source of the Lyα emission. In the region near the Lyα peak, the gas is slowly receding (~100 km s–1) with respect to the MIPS source, thus making the hyper-/superwind hypothesis unlikely. We find a sub-thermal line ratio between two CO transitions, I CO(5-4)/I CO(3-2) = 0.97 ± 0.21. This line ratio is lower than the average values found in high-z submillimeter galaxies and QSOs but is consistent with the value found in the Galactic center, suggesting that there is a large reservoir of low-density molecular gas that is spread over the MIPS source and its vicinity.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We present IRAM PdBI observations of the CO(3-2) and CO(5-4) line transitions from a Ly-alpha blob at z~2.7 in order to investigate the gas kinematics, determine the location of the dominant energy source, and study the physical conditions of the molecular gas. CO line and dust continuum emission are detected at the location of a strong MIPS source that is offset by ~1.5" from the Ly-alpha peak. Neither of these emission components is resolved with the 1.7" beam, showing that the gas and dust are confined to within ~7kpc from this galaxy. No millimeter source is found at the location of the Ly-alpha peak, ruling out a central compact source of star formation as the power source for the Ly-alpha emission. Combined with a spatially-resolved spectrum of Ly-alpha and HeII, we constrain the kinematics of the extended gas using the CO emission as a tracer of the systemic redshift. Near the MIPS source, the Ly-alpha profile is symmetric and its line center agrees with that of CO line, implying that there are no significant bulk flows and that the photo-ionization from the MIPS source might be the dominant source of the Ly-alpha emission. In the region near the Ly-alpha peak, the gas is slowly receding (~100km/s) with respect to the MIPS source, thus making the hyper-/superwind hypothesis unlikely. We find a sub-thermal line ratio between two CO transitions, I_CO(5-4)/I_CO(3-2)=0.97+/-0.21. This line ratio is lower than the average values found in high-z SMGs and QSOs, but consistent with the value found in the Galactic center, suggesting that there is a large reservoir of low-density molecular gas that is spread over the MIPS source and its vicinity.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014
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    Sungryong Hong · Arjun Dey · Moire K. M. Prescott
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    ABSTRACT: Modern spectroscopic surveys produce large spectroscopic databases, generally with sizes well beyond the scope of manual investigation. The need arises, therefore, for an automated line detection method with objective indicators for detection significance. In this paper, we present an automated and objective method for emission line detection in spectroscopic surveys and apply this technique to 1574 spectra, obtained with the Hectospec spectrograph on the MMT Observatory (MMTO), to detect Lyman alpha emitters near z ~ 2.7. The basic idea is to generate on-source (signal plus noise) and off-source (noise only) mock observations using Monte Carlo simulations, and calculate completeness and reliability values, (C, R), for each simulated signal. By comparing the detections from real data with the Monte Carlo results, we assign the completeness and reliability values to each real detection. From 1574 spectra, we obtain 881 raw detections and, by removing low reliability detections, we finalize 649 detections from an automated pipeline. Most of high completeness and reliability detections, (C, R) ~ (1.0, 1.0), are robust detections when visually inspected; the low C and R detections are also marginal on visual inspection. This method at detecting faint sources is dependent on the accuracy of the sky subtraction.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
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    ABSTRACT: We present observations of 18 galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey made with the SPIRAL optical integral field unit (IFU) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The galaxies are selected to have a narrow range in stellar mass (6x10^9Msolar < M* <2x10^10 Msolar) in order to focus on the effects of environment. Local galaxy environments are measured quantitatively using 5th nearest neighbour surface densities. We find that the total star formation rates (SFR) measured from the IFU data are consistent with total SFRs measured from aperture correcting either GAMA or Sloan Digital Sky Survey single-fibre observations. The mean differences are SFR_GAMA/SFR_IFU = 1.26+/-0.23, sigma=0.90 and for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we similarly find SFR_Brinchmann/SFR_IFU = 1.34+/-0.17, sigma=0.67. Examining the relationships with environment, we find off-centre and clumpy Halpha emission is not significantly dependent on environment, being present in 2/7 (29^+20_-11 per cent) galaxies in high-density environments (>0.77 Mpc^-2), and 5/11 (45^+15_-13 per cent) galaxies in low-density environments (<0.77 Mpc^-2). We find a weak but not significant relationship of the total star formation rates of star-forming galaxies with environment. Due to the size of our sample and the scatter observed we do not draw a definitive conclusion about a possible SFR dependence on environment. Examining the spatial distribution of the Halpha emission, we find no evidence for a change in shape or amplitude of the radial profile of star-forming galaxies with environment. If these observations are borne out in larger samples this would infer that any environment-driven star-formation suppression must either act very rapidly (the `infall-and-quench' model) or that galaxies must evolve in a density-dependent manner (an `in-situ evolution' model).
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: Measurements of the low-z Halpha luminosity function have a large dispersion in the local number density of sources, and correspondingly in the SFR density. The possible causes for these discrepancies include limited volume sampling, biases arising from survey sample selection, different methods of correcting for dust obscuration and AGN contamination. The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) provide deep spectroscopic observations over a wide sky area enabling detection of a large sample of star-forming galaxies spanning 0.001<SFR(Halpha)<100 with which to robustly measure the evolution of the SFR density in the low-z universe. The large number of high SFR galaxies present in our sample allow an improved measurement of the bright end of the luminosity function, indicating that the decrease in number density of sources at bright luminosities is best described by a Saunders functional form rather than the traditional Schechter function. This result is consistent with other published luminosity functions in the FIR and radio. For GAMA and SDSS we find the r-band apparent magnitude limit, combined with the subsequent requirement for Halpha detection leads to an incompleteness due to missing bright Halpha sources with faint r-band magnitudes.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, \tau^f_B, and the stellar mass surface density, \mu_{*}, of nearby (z < 0.13) spiral galaxies: log(\tau^f_B) = 1.12(+-0.11)log(\mu_{*}/M_sol kpc^2)-8.6(+-0.8). This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and detected in the FIR/submm in the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to \mu_{*} we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and S'ersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships between stellar mass, metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the ISM. We use the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu & Tuffs (2011) to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (sSFR), stellar mass, and \mu_{*}, in which the attenuation of the UV light used to measure the SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which is demonstrably due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar radiation field.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ~300000 galaxies over 280 square degrees, to a limiting magnitude of r_pet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0<z<0.5 with a median redshift of z~0.2, although the redshift distribution includes a small number of systems, primarily quasars, at higher redshifts, up to and beyond z=1. The redshift accuracy ranges from sigma_v~50km/s to sigma_v~100km/s depending on the signal-to-noise of the spectrum. Here we describe the GAMA spectroscopic reduction and analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750<lambda<8850 A at a resolution of R~1300. The final flux calibration is typically accurate to 10-20%, although the reliability is worse at the extreme wavelength ends, and poorer in the blue than the red. We present details of the measurement of emission and absorption features in the GAMA spectra. These measurements are characterised through a variety of quality control analyses detailing the robustness and reliability of the measurements. We illustrate the quality of the measurements with a brief exploration of elementary emission line properties of the galaxies in the GAMA sample. We demonstrate the luminosity dependence of the Balmer decrement, consistent with previously published results, and explore further how Balmer decrement varies with galaxy mass and redshift. We also investigate the mass and redshift dependencies of the [NII]/Halpha vs [OIII]/Hbeta spectral diagnostic diagram, commonly used to discriminate between star forming and nuclear activity in galaxies.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    Moire K. M. Prescott · Arjun Dey · Buell T. Jannuzi
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    ABSTRACT: Using a systematic broadband search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Lyα nebulae (or Lyα "blobs") at 2 z 3 within 8.5 deg2 of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Boötes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of ≈108h –370 Mpc3. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Lyα nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Lyα emission at 1.7 z 2.7, 4 of which were new discoveries. The confirmed Lyα nebulae span a range of Lyα equivalent widths, colors, sizes, and line ratios, and most show spatially extended continuum emission. The remaining candidates did not reveal any strong emission lines, but instead exhibit featureless, diffuse, blue continuum spectra. Their nature remains mysterious, but we speculate that some of these might be Lyα nebulae lying within the redshift desert (i.e., 1.2 z 1.6). Our spectroscopic follow-up confirms the power of using deep broadband imaging to search for the bright end of the Lyα nebula population across enormous comoving volumes.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2012 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We use the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey (GAMA) I data set combined with GALEX, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) imaging to construct the low-redshift (z < 0.1) galaxy luminosity functions in FUV, NUV, ugriz and YJHK bands from within a single well-constrained volume of 3.4 x 10(5) (Mpc h(-1))(3). The derived luminosity distributions are normalized to the SDSS data release 7 (DR7) main survey to reduce the estimated cosmic variance to the 5 per cent level. The data are used to construct the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) from 0.1 to 2.1 mu m free from any wavelength-dependent cosmic variance for both the elliptical and non-elliptical populations. The two populations exhibit dramatically different CSEDs as expected for a predominantly old and young population, respectively. Using the Driver et al. prescription for the azimuthally averaged photon escape fraction, the non-ellipticals are corrected for the impact of dust attenuation and the combined CSED constructed. The final results show that the Universe is currently generating (1.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(35) h W Mpc(-3) of which (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10(35) h W Mpc-3 is directly released into the inter-galactic medium and (0.6 +/- 0.1) x 10(35) h W Mpc(-3) is reprocessed and reradiated by dust in the far-IR. Using the GAMA data and our dust model we predict the mid- and far-IR emission which agrees remarkably well with available data. We therefore provide a robust description of the pre- and post-dust attenuated energy output of the nearby Universe from 0.1 mu m to 0.6 mm. The largest uncertainty in this measurement lies in the mid- and far-IR bands stemming from the dust attenuation correction and its currently poorly constrained dependence on environment, stellar mass and morphology.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    Moire K. M. Prescott · Arjun Dey · Buell T. Jannuzi
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    ABSTRACT: Using a systematic broad-band search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Lya nebulae (or Lya "blobs") at 2<z<3 within 8.5 square degrees of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) Bootes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of ~10^8 h_70^-3 Mpc^3. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Lya nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Lya emission at 1.7<z<2.7, four of which were new discoveries. The confirmed Lya nebulae span a range of Lya equivalent widths, colors, sizes, and line ratios, and most show spatially-extended continuum emission. The remaining candidates did not reveal any strong emission lines, but instead exhibit featureless, diffuse, blue continuum spectra. Their nature remains mysterious, but we speculate that some of these might be Lya nebulae lying within the redshift desert (i.e., 1.2<z<1.6). Our spectroscopic follow-up confirms the power of using deep broad-band imaging to search for the bright end of the Lya nebula population across enormous comoving volumes.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2012
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    ABSTRACT: This document summarizes the results of a community-based discussion of the potential science impact of the Mayall+BigBOSS highly multiplexed multi-object spectroscopic capability. The KPNO Mayall 4m telescope equipped with the DOE- and internationally-funded BigBOSS spectrograph offers one of the most cost-efficient ways of accomplishing many of the pressing scientific goals identified for this decade by the "New Worlds, New Horizons" report. The BigBOSS Key Project will place unprecedented constraints on cosmological parameters related to the expansion history of the universe. With the addition of an open (publicly funded) community access component, the scientific impact of BigBOSS can be extended to many important astrophysical questions related to the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, and the IGM. Massive spectroscopy is the critical missing ingredient in numerous ongoing and planned ground- and space-based surveys, and BigBOSS is unique in its ability to provide this to the US community. BigBOSS data from community-led projects will play a vital role in the education and training of students and in maintaining US leadership in these fields of astrophysics. We urge the NSF-AST division to support community science with the BigBOSS multi-object spectrograph through the period of the BigBOSS survey in order to ensure public access to the extraordinary spectroscopic capability.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Context: The mass-metallicity relationship (MMR) of star-forming galaxies is well-established, however there is still some disagreement with respect to its exact shape and its possible dependence on other observables. Aims: We measure the MMR in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We compare our measured MMR to that measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and study the dependence of the MMR on various selection criteria to identify potential causes for disparities seen in the literature. Methods: We use strong emission line ratio diagnostics to derive oxygen abundances. We then apply a range of selection criteria for the minimum signal-to-noise in various emission lines, as well as the apparent and absolute magnitude to study variations in the inferred MMR. Results: The shape and position of the MMR can differ significantly depending on the metallicity calibration and selection used. After selecting a robust metallicity calibration amongst those tested, we find that the mass-metallicity relation for redshifts 0.061< z<0.35 in GAMA is in reasonable agreement with that found in the SDSS despite the difference in the luminosity range probed. Conclusions: In view of the significant variations of the MMR brought about by reasonable changes in the sample selection criteria and method, we recommend that care be taken when comparing the MMR from different surveys and studies directly. We also conclude that there could be a modest level of evolution over 0.06<z<0.35 within the GAMA sample.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2012 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
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    ABSTRACT: We have measured the clustering properties of low-redshift (z < 0.3) sub-mm galaxies detected at 250 micron in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) field. We selected a sample for which we have high-quality spectroscopic redshifts, obtained from reliably matching the 250-micron sources to a complete (for r < 19.4) sample of galaxies from the GAMA database. Both the angular and spatial clustering strength are measured for all z < 0.3 sources as well as for five redshift slices with thickness delta z=0.05 in the range 0.05 < z < 0.3. Our measured spatial clustering length r_0 is comparable to that of optically-selected, moderately star-forming (blue) galaxies: we find values around 5 Mpc. One of the redshift bins contains an interesting structure, at z = 0.164.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: We use the GAMA I dataset combined with GALEX, SDSS and UKIDSS imaging to construct the low-redshift (z<0.1) galaxy luminosity functions in FUV, NUV, ugriz, and YJHK bands from within a single well constrained volume of 3.4 x 10^5 (Mpc/h)^{3}. The derived luminosity distributions are normalised to the SDSS DR7 main survey to reduce the estimated cosmic variance to the 5 per cent level. The data are used to construct the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) from 0.1 to 2.1 \mum free from any wavelength dependent cosmic variance for both the elliptical and non-elliptical populations. The two populations exhibit dramatically different CSEDs as expected for a predominantly old and young population respectively. Using the Driver et al. (2008) prescription for the azimuthally averaged photon escape fraction, the non-ellipticals are corrected for the impact of dust attenuation and the combined CSED constructed. The final results show that the Universe is currently generating (1.8 +/- 0.3) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} of which (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is directly released into the inter-galactic medium and (0.6 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is reprocessed and reradiated by dust in the far-IR. Using the GAMA data and our dust model we predict the mid and far-IR emission which agrees remarkably well with available data. We therefore provide a robust description of the pre- and post dust attenuated energy output of the nearby Universe from 0.1micron to 0.6mm. The largest uncertainty in this measurement lies in the mid and far-IR bands stemming from the dust attenuation correction and its currently poorly constrained dependence on environment, stellar mass, and morphology.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012

Publication Stats

2k Citations
262.58 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013-2015
    • IT University of Copenhagen
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
    • University of the Western Cape
      • Department of Physics
      Kaapstad, Western Cape, South Africa
  • 2011-2014
    • University of California, Santa Barbara
      • Department of Physics
      Santa Barbara, California, United States
    • Paris Diderot University
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2002-2013
    • Liverpool John Moores University
      • Astrophysics Research Institute
      Liverpool, England, United Kingdom
  • 2009
    • University of Central Lancashire
      • School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences
      Preston, England, United Kingdom
  • 2006-2009
    • The University of Arizona
      • Department of Astronomy
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 2004
    • California Institute of Technology
      • Spitzer Science Center
      Pasadena, California, United States