Francisco Javier Algar Algar

Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Cordoue, Andalusia, Spain

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Publications (48)67.17 Total impact


  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Transplantation Proceedings
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The survival benefit of lung transplantation (LTx) for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is well demonstrated. We aim to compare children and adult CF recipients to assess whether there are differences in survival and clinical outcomes, and to identify risk factors for mortality. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 442 consecutive LTx performed at our institution in a 20-year period was conducted. CF patients were distributed into two groups: children (age <18 years) and adults (age ≥18 years). Donor and recipient general demographic data, perioperative and postoperative factors including 30-day mortality, survival, primary graft dysfunction (PGD), complications, acute rejection (AR) and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) were analysed and compared between groups. Univariable, Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed. Results: The study group included 120 consecutive CF patients: 50 children (13 ± 3 years) and 70 adults (25 ± 6 years) undergoing 111 bilateral, 4 lobar, 4 combined and 1 unilateral LTx. Comparative analysis (children versus adults): survival (overall; 5, 10 and 15 years) 57, 45, 35% vs 67, 55, 43% (P = 0.32); survival (1-year survivors; 5, 10 and 15 years): 75, 64, 46% vs 90, 75, 59% (P = 0.09); 30-day mortality: 14 vs 16% (P = 0.27); urgent LTx: 32 vs 17% (P = 0.04); use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB): 56 vs 28% (P = 0.002); intensive care unit stay: 20 ± 19 vs 10 ± 9 days (P = 0.006); AR episodes (n): 1.4 ± 0.7 vs 1.2 ± 0.8 (P = 0.004). Incidence of PGD and freedom from CLAD did not differ between groups. Predictors of mortality were: use of CPB (HR 3.12; 95% CI 1.33-7.35; P < 0.01), post-transplant diabetes mellitus (HR 2.49; 95% CI 1.13-5.43; P = 0.02) and pneumonia episodes within the first month post-transplant (HR 2.82; 95% CI 1.27-6.29; P = 0.01). Conclusion: Paediatric CF patients usually present with poorer pre-transplant status, require CPB more frequently and have a higher incidence of post-LTx diabetes and infections. This might explain the trend towards a better long-term survival observed in adult CF patients.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: High early mortality after lung transplantation (LT) for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is still not well controlled, and some aspects remain debated. The aim of this study was to evaluate our experience to identify factors that might improve the early outcomes. Among the 427 patients transplanted from October 1993 to December 2014, 117 IPF patients underwent LT at our department. There was an increasing age of transplant recipients, and the overall early (1-mo_ mortality was 25/117 (21.4%) with a progressive decrease over the years. Logistic regression analysis for early mortality was performed, and multivariate analysis identified recipient age <55 years (P = .042; odds ratio [OR], 2.98), single-lung transplants (P = .001; OR, 5.226), and previous corticosteroid treatment (P = .05; OR, 5.128) as independent risk factors for development of early mortality. In conclusion, despite the increasing age of transplant recipients, we observed a decrease in mortality to almost one-half compared with our initial results. According to our results, the mortality risk in patients <55 years old is independent from the type of transplant (single or double), being higher with a single transplant. In addition, corticosteroid treatment should be reduced to achieve lower early mortality.
    Preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The number of geriatric patients with lung cancer is expected to increase in the next few years, especially patients over 80, and therefore it is important to know where the therapeutic limits should be drawn. Is surgery a good option in patients over 80? Objective To show the results of lung resection in patients over 80 years of age to evaluate the safety and short-term results. Material and methods Retrospective study of 21 patients who underwent lung resection between October 1999 and October 2011. Results The mean age of the patients was 82 ± 2; 13 lobectomies were performed,5 transegmental resections, 2 segmentectomies, and 1 pneumonectomy. Postoperative complications (28.6%) were: respiratory 66.6%, cardiological 16.7% and digestive 16,7%. Perioperative mortality was 9,5% (2). There was a significant association between mortality and age (P = .023), or pneumonectomy (P = .002). We studied COPD as a risk factor for mortality and found a statistically significant relation with the need for ICU (P < .007), and the appearance of complications (P < .044). Conclusions Resective lung surgery is feasible and safe in selected patients over 80 years of age. In our experience, squamous cell carcinoma was the most frequent tumor. The most common procedure was lobectomy which is a safe technique with a low complicaction rate in elderly patients. Pneumonectomy s hould be avoided, as we have found a significant association with perioperative mortality.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Cirugía Española
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years advances in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery have been aimed at reducing the number of video surgery ports, and especially major lung resections pose the greatest challenge. We describe a new minimally invasive as well as aesthetic approach for thoracoscopic lobectomy. The technique poses no difficulty for the surgeon and has certain advantages over other videothoracoscopic approaches.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · The Annals of thoracic surgery

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Cirugía Española

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Cirugía Española
  • Elisabet Arango Tomás · Francisco Javier Algar Algar · Ángel Salvatierra Velázquez

    No preview · Article · Jan 2014
  • Elisabet Arango Tomás · Francisco Javier Algar Algar · Ángel Salvatierra Velázquez

    No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Cirugía Española
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    ABSTRACT: Extended donors (EDs) are safely used to increase the donor pool in lung transplantation (LT), but their influence in critically ill patients (extended recipients [ERs]) remains controversial. We compared LT outcomes matching optimal donors (ODs) or EDs with optimal recipients (ORs) or ERs. Three hundred and sixty-five LTs were reviewed. ED criteria: age >55, PaO2/FiO2 < 350 mmHg, pulmonary infiltrates/purulent secretions and ischaemic times >6 h (single LT [SLT]) and >9 h (double LT [DLT]). ER criteria: pulmonary fibrosis or pulmonary hypertension, pretransplant intubation, age >60 years and bypass >2 h. Four groups were created: Group 1 (OD/OR), Group 2 (OD/ER), Group 3 (ED/OR) and Group 4 (ED/ER). Thirty-day mortality, primary graft dysfunction (PGD), onset of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), long-term survival and other transplant outcomes were compared between OD and ED, OR and ER and among the four groups of study. There were 151 SLTs and 214 DLTs. Donors: OD (n = 229) vs ED (n = 136); PGD 8 vs 10% (P = 0.43); 30-day mortality 19 vs 20% (P = 0.53) and survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years) 67, 47, 34, 26 vs 69, 53, 46 and 29% (P = 0.33). Recipients: OR (n = 182) vs ER (n = 183); PGD 7 vs 10% (P = 0.10); 30-day mortality 15 vs 23% (P = 0.04) and survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years): 73, 57, 46, 30 vs 61, 42, 29 and 23% (P = 0.002). Four donor/recipient (D/R) groups: Group 1 (n = 122), Group 2 (n = 106), Group 3 (n = 61), Group 4 (n = 76); PGD 10, 6, 3 and 16% (P = 0.05); 30-day mortality 13, 26, 19 and 20%, respectively (P = 0.13); survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years) 74, 55, 44 and 35% (Group 1), 55, 39, 22 and 16% (Group 2), 70, 59, 48 and 26% (Group 3) and 68, 47, 37 and 22% (Group 4) (P = 0.004). No differences in the onset of BOS were observed among the four study groups. LT in critically ill recipients is associated with poor early and long-term outcomes, irrespective of the quality of the donor and length of ischaemic times.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2013 · European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The number of geriatric patients with lung cancer is expected to increase in the next few years, especially patients over 80, and therefore it is important to know where the therapeutic limits should be drawn. Is surgery a good option in patients over 80? To show the results of lung resection in patients over 80 years of age to evaluate the safety and short-term results. Retrospective study of 21 patients who underwent lung resection between October 1999 and October 2011. The mean age of the patients was 82±2; 13 lobectomies were performed,5 transegmental resections, 2 segmentectomies, and 1 pneumonectomy. Postoperative complications (28.6%) were: respiratory 66.6%, cardiological 16.7% and digestive 16,7%. Perioperative mortality was 9,5% (2). There was a significant association between mortality and age (P=.023), or pneumonectomy (P=.002). We studied COPD as a risk factor for mortality and found a statistically significant relation with the need for ICU (P<.007), and the appearance of complications (P<.044). Resective lung surgery is feasible and safe in selected patients over 80 years of age. In our experience, squamous cell carcinoma was the most frequent tumor. The most common procedure was lobectomy which is a safe technique with a low complicaction rate in elderly patients. Pneumonectomy s hould be avoided, as we have found a significant association with perioperative mortality.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · Cirugía Española
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    ABSTRACT: Suppl. 1 to Vol. 17 (26–29 May 2013) - SESSION IV: YOUNG INVESTIGATORS AWARD
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To determine whether lung retrieval from traumatic donors performed within 24 h of brain death has a negative impact on early graft function and survival after lung transplantation (LT), when compared with those retrieved after 24 h. Methods: Review of lung transplants performed from traumatic donors over a 17-year period. Recipients were distributed into two groups: transplants from traumatic donor lungs retrieved within 24 h of brain death (Group A), and transplants from traumatic donor lungs retrieved after 24 h of brain death (Group B). Demographic data of donors and recipients, early graft function, perioperative complications and mortality were compared between both groups. Results: Among 356 lung transplants performed at our institution, 132 were from traumatic donors (70% male, 30% female). Group A: 73 (55%); Group B: 59 (45%). There were 53 single, 77 double, and 2 combined LT. Indications were emphysema in 41 (31%), pulmonary fibrosis in 31 (23%), cystic fibrosis in 38 (29%), bronchiectasis in 9 (7%) and other indications in 13 patients (10%). Donor and recipient demographic data, need or cardiopulmonary bypass, postoperative complications and Intensive Care Unit and hospital stay did not differ between groups. Primary graft dysfunction (A vs B): 9 (16%) vs 13 (26%) P = 0.17. PaO2/FiO2 24 h post-transplant (A vs B): 303 mmHg vs 288 mmHg (P = 0.57). Number of acute rejection episodes (A vs B): 0.93 vs 1.49 (P = 0.01). Postoperative intubation time (A vs B): 99 vs 100 h (P = 0.99). 30-day mortality (A vs B): 7 (10%) vs 2 (3.5%) (P = 0.13). Freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (A vs B): 82, 72, 37, 22 vs 78, 68, 42, 15%, at 3, 5, 10 and 15 years, respectively (P = 0.889). Survival (A vs B): 65, 54, 46, 42 and 27 vs 60, 50, 45, 43 and 29% at 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years, respectively (P = 0.937). Conclusions: In our experience, early lung retrieval after brain death from traumatic donors does not adversely affect early and long-term outcomes after LT.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery
  • Elisabet Arango Tomás · Francisco Javier Algar Algar · Angel Salvatierra Velázquez

    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Cirugía Española
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES In current practice, donors and recipients are not matched for gender in lung transplantation. However, some data have suggested a possible effect of gender combinations on lung transplant outcomes. We examined whether donor-recipient (D/R) gender mismatch is related to adverse outcomes after lung transplantation in terms of early and long-term graft function and survival.METHODS We reviewed 256 donors and lung transplant recipients over a 14-year period. Patients were distributed into four groups: Group A (D/R: female/female), Group B (D/R: male/male), Group C (D/R: female/male), Group D (D/R: male/female). Donor and recipient variables were compared among groups, including early graft function, 30-day mortality, freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), and long-term survival.RESULTSGroup A: 57 (22%), Group B: 99 (39%), Group C: 62 (24%), Group D: 38 (15%) transplants (P = 0.001). Donor age was 29 ± 14, 27 ± 12, 33 ± 13 and 23 ± 12 years for Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.004). Recipient age was 31 ± 15, 44 ± 17, 42 ± 16 and 30 ± 16 years for Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.000). PaO(2)/FiO(2) (mmHg) 24 h post-transplant was: Group A: 276 ± 144, Group B: 297 ± 131, Group C: 344 ± 133 and Group D: 238 ± 138 (P = 0.015). Primary graft dysfunction developed in 23, 14, 17 and 21% of recipients from Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.45). Operative mortality was 4.4, 6.5, 5.2 and 2%, for recipients from Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.66). Freedom from BOS was 73, 59 and 36% for gender-matched transplants vs 76, 67 and 40% for gender-mismatched transplants at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively (P = 0.618), without differences among groups. A non-significant survival benefit was observed for female recipients, irrespective of the donor gender.CONCLUSIONS Donor-recipient gender mismatch does not have a negative impact on early graft function and mortality following lung transplantation. There is a trend towards a survival benefit for female recipients, irrespective of the donor gender.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The postoperative period following lung transplantation remains critical because of several complications. Infection, primary graft failure, acute rejection, and surgical complications are risk factors for mortality and morbidity. The recognition and early treatment of these complications is important to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of postoperative complications observed in our center during the last year. We were particularly interested in the influence of variables, such as inotrope usage and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) score, a well-known, and validated mortality prediction model for general intensive care unit (ICU) patients only infrequently reported in the transplantation literature. High APACHE II scores were significantly associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation (P = 0.041) and a tracheostomy requirement (P = .035). The factors significantly associated with an early postoperative death were older donor age (P = .005), prolonged donor ICU period (P = .004), need for cardiopulmonary bypass (CB; P = .005), and high inotrope requirements in the ICU (P = .034). CB data were biased because we selected the worst case patients. Donor age and high inotrope requirements in the ICU have been reported previously to be prognostic factors for poor graft function. We believe that control of these variables may improve outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · Transplantation Proceedings
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to describe the incidence of lung cancer in patients after lung transplantation (LT). We performed an observational, retrospective, descriptive study based on data from 340 patients undergoing lung transplantation between October 1993 and December 2010. We collected data about the donors, recipients, intra- and postoperative periods, and survivals. We identified 9 (2.6%) patients who developed lung cancer after LT. Their average age was 56 ± 9.3 years (range, 18-63). All cases were men with 8/9 (88.8%) having received a single lung transplant. All cancers developed in the native lung. The indications for transplantation were: emphysema type chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n = 5), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 3), or cystic fibrosis (n = 1); 77% of them were former smokers. All of the COPD patient were affected. The interval from transplantation to diagnosis was 53.3 ± 12 months (range 24-86). Survival after cancer diagnosis was 49.3 ± 6.3 (range = 0-180) months. LT was associated with a relatively high incidence of lung cancer, particularly in the native lung. In our series, lung cancer was related more to patients with emphysema-type COPD and a history of smoking. We believe that these patients should be closely followed to establish the diagnosis and apply early treatment.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2012 · Transplantation Proceedings
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    ABSTRACT: Lung Volume Reduction Surgery (LVRS) has become a palliative treatment for patients with advanced emphysema and disabling dyspnea. After single lung transplantation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, LVRS may be indicated to improve graft dysfunction caused by native lung hyperinflation compressing the grafted lung. This common complication is the subject of our study, which showed LVRS to be helpful to manage this situation. We performed an observational retrospective and descriptive study using the data of 293 patients transplanted in our center between January 1996 and October 2011. Some of the patients who underwent a single lung transplantation developed native lung hyperinflation years after the transplantation, interfering with respiratory function due to graft compression.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · Transplantation Proceedings
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    ABSTRACT: Lung transplantation (OLT) remains the only available therapy for patients with end-stage idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The objective of this study was to review our experience of OLT for end-stage IPF (IPFLT) patients, seeking to identify variables associated with survival for comparison with outcomes of other indications for LT (OILT). From October 1993 to December 2009, we performed 310 consecutive OLT in 301 patients for treatment of various end-stage pulmonary conditions. The indications for OLT were: IPF (n=89, 30.5%) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=82), cystic fibrosis (n=80), bronchiectasis (n=12), alfa-1-antitrypsin deficit (n=6), primary pulmonary hypertension (n=4), bronchiolitis obliterans (n=4), other conditions (n=15). We observed significant differences in the actuarial survival between the IPFLT and the OILT groups particularly at the expense of worse perioperative 30-day and early 1-year mortality in the IPFLT group. Upon univariate and multivariate analyses, the need for cardiopulmonary bypass, previous recipient ventilator dependence, and donor age>50 years were all associated with poorer survival rates among IPF patients. In our experience, survival did not differ between patients who underwent a single versus a bilateral sequential lung transplant (BSLT); however, BSLT cases were associated with short-term damage but long-term survival. The functional results in the IPFLT group were excellent. We observed significant improvements in the values of arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2), arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2), forced vital capacity (FVC%) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%) at 6, 12, and 36 months compared to their pretransplant baseline results.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2010 · Transplantation Proceedings
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    ABSTRACT: The number of patients awaiting lung transplantation has steadily increased over the past decade, but the number of donors has remained relatively stable. Owing to the increasing scarcity of donor lungs, especially for pediatric and small adult recipients, advanced operative strategies for the use of larger grafts for smaller recipients have been developed. Size matching between donors and recipients represents one of the organ distribution criteria widely accepted by lung transplantation teams. However, in some cases it is not possible to allocate a donor to the corresponding size-compatible recipient. To avoid possible complications derived from the implantation of oversized lungs into smaller recipients, various methods of downsizing are applied for cadaveric donor lungs, such as lobar transplantation. We review our experience in 6 patients undergoing volume reduction of the lung graft by lobar resection at the time of transplantation. Graft volume reduction by anatomic resection (lobar transplantation) is a reliable and safe procedure to overcome size disparities between the donor and the recipient of a lung transplant, and thus to maximize the number of donors.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2010 · Transplantation Proceedings