B J Rensing

St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegen, Utrecht, Netherlands

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Publications (122)761.35 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Data on procedural and clinical outcomes of the everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS, Abbott) in percutaneous coronary intervention in a real-world setting is limited. Early and mid-term clinical outcomes of the BVS in a real-world population were investigated in this single centre study. Methods: Patients treated with the BVS in the St. Antonius Hospital from April 2012 to February 2015 were included in a prospective single centre registry. Procedural success defined as b20% residual restenosis and 30- day and 6-month clinical outcome were investigated. Cumulative event rates were expressed using Kaplan - Meier method. Results: A total of 108 patients were included in the study, including patientswith ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) 18.5%, non-STEMI 22.2% and unstable angina 9.3%. In total 125 lesions were treated with the BVS, of which 48.8% B2/C type lesions including 19.2% bare metal or drugs-eluting in-stent restenosis. Procedural angiographic success was achieved in 99.2% of all patients. Clinical follow-up rate was 100% at 30-day and 87% at 6-month. The rate of cardiac death, target vessel revascularization and definite stent thrombosis was 0%, 0.9% and 0.9% at 30-day and 0.9%, 5.6% and 1.9% at 6-month. The composite end point of target lesion failure (Cardiac death, target lesion myocardial infarction MI and target lesion revascularization) was 1.9% at 30-day and 5.6% at 6-month, respectively. Conclusions: The use of the BVS in a real-world setting demonstrated excellent procedural success and acceptable mid-term clinical outcomes. The rate of definite scaffold thrombosis was not dissimilar to other BVS registries.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Myocardial SPECT remains an important diagnostic technique in patients suspected of significant coronary artery disease. However, the diagnostic accuracy is hampered by several clinical and technical difficulties. Among these, soft tissue attenuation is one of the most frequent causes. Attenuation correction has the power to correct for these artifacts, increasing the diagnostic accuracy of myocardial SPECT. The current review summarizes the available clinical evidence for attenuation correction and raises the question if this technique is not underutilized in current clinical practice.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports
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    ABSTRACT: Drug-eluting stents (DES), delivering antiproliferative drugs from a durable polymer, have shown to reduce in-stent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared to bare-metal stents (BMS). However, they have been associated with a hypersensitivity reaction, delayed healing, and incomplete endothelialization, which may contribute to an increased risk of late stent thrombosis. Consequently, a prolonged duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is needed, with an increased risk of bleeding complication. A number of stent technologies are being developed in an attempt to modify late thrombotic events and DAPT duration. The Optimax™ stent is such a novel, next generation bioactive stent (BAS), in which a thicker layer of titanium-nitride-oxide coating is inserted over the stent struts. The rationale of this is to obtain more efficient and rapid vascular healing at the site of the stent implantation. The aim of TIDES-ACS Trial is to compare clinical outcome in patients presenting with ACS, treated with PCI using Optimax-BAS versus Synergy™-EES. Second objective is to explore whether the Optimax™-BAS use is superior compared with Synergy™-EES use with respect of hard end points (cardiac death, myocardial infarction [MI] and major bleeding). A prospective, randomized, multicenter trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02049229), will be conducted in interventional centres in Finland (six centres), France (five centres) and Holland (two centres), including a total of 1800 patients.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Minerva cardioangiologica
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    ABSTRACT: Transcatheter edge-to-edge mitral valve repair is an approach for treating mitral regurgitation, which is an alternative for surgery in patients with a high surgical risk. Although the safety and efficacy of the technique have been demonstrated, it is still associated with potentially life-threatening complications. The aim of this paper is to discuss the nature, management, and prevention of the most important procedural complications associated with this procedure.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Herz

  • No preview · Article · May 2013 · Heart (British Cardiac Society)
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: We investigated whether sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) are superior to next-generation zotarolimus-eluting stents (ZES) in treating patients with total coronary occlusions (TCO). Methods and results: In a prospective, randomised trial we compared the SES with the zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES; Endeavor or Resolute) after successful recanalisation of TCO. During the first phase of the trial, 51 patients were assigned to receive the SES and 46 patients to receive the Endeavor ZES. In the second phase we randomised 103 patients to the SES group and 104 patients to the Resolute ZES group. The primary endpoint was in-segment late lumen loss at eight-month follow-up. At eight months, patients in the SES group had less in-segment and in-stent late loss as compared to the Endeavor group: -0.13±0.3 mm vs. 0.27±0.6 mm (p=0.0002) and -0.13±0.5 mm vs. 0.54±0.5 mm (p<0.0001), respectively. In contrast, the SES and the Resolute ZES showed comparable amounts of in-segment (-0.03±0.7 mm vs. -0.10±0.7 mm, p=0.6) and in-stent (0.03±0.8 mm vs. 0.05±0.8 mm, p=0.9) late loss. Conclusions: In the treatment of TCOs, the SES was associated with superior angiographic outcomes compared to the Endeavor ZES. On the other hand, the SES and the Resolute ZES showed comparable angiographic outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · EuroIntervention: journal of EuroPCR in collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, affecting millions of individuals worldwide (1-3). The rapid, irregular, and disordered electrical activity in the atria gives rise to palpitations, fatigue, dyspnea, chest pain and dizziness with or without syncope (4, 5). Patients with AF have a five-fold higher risk of stroke (6). Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with warfarin is commonly used for stroke prevention in patients with AF and has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke by 64% (7). Warfarin therapy has several major disadvantages, however, including bleeding, non-tolerance, interactions with other medications and foods, non-compliance and a narrow therapeutic range (8-11). These issues, together with poor appreciation of the risk-benefit ratio, unawareness of guidelines, or absence of an OAC monitoring outpatient clinic may explain why only 30-60% of patients with AF are prescribed this drug (8). The problems associated with warfarin, combined with the limited efficacy and/or serious side effects associated with other medications used for AF (12,13), highlight the need for effective non-pharmacological approaches to treatment. One such approach is catheter ablation (CA), a procedure in which a radiofrequency electrical current is applied to regions of the heart to create small ablation lesions that electrically isolate potential AF triggers (4). CA is a well-established treatment for AF symptoms (14, 15), that may also decrease the risk of stroke. Recent data showed a significant decrease in the relative risk of stroke and transient ischemic attack events among patients who underwent ablation compared with those undergoing antiarrhythmic drug therapy (16). Since the left atrial appendage (LAA) is the source of thrombi in more than 90% of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (17), another approach to stroke prevention is to physically block clots from exiting the LAA. One method for occluding the LAA is via percutaneous placement of the WATCHMAN LAA closure device. The WATCHMAN device resembles a small parachute. It consists of a nitinol frame covered by fabric polyethyl terephthalate that prevents emboli, but not blood, from exiting during the healing process. Fixation anchors around the perimeter secure the device in the LAA (Figure 1). To date, the WATCHMAN is the only implanted percutaneous device for which a randomized clinical trial has been reported. In this study, implantation of the WATCHMAN was found to be at least as effective as warfarin in preventing stroke (all-causes) and death (all-causes) (18). This device received the Conformité Européenne (CE) mark for use in the European Union for warfarin eligible patients and in those who have a contraindication to anticoagulation therapy (19). Given the proven effectiveness of CA to alleviate AF symptoms and the promising data with regard to reduction of thromboembolic events with both CA and WATCHMAN implantation, combining the two procedures is hoped to further reduce the incidence of stroke in high-risk patients while simultaneously relieving symptoms. The combined procedure may eventually enable patients to undergo implantation of the WATCHMAN device without subsequent warfarin treatment, since the CA procedure itself reduces thromboembolic events. This would present an avenue of treatment previously unavailable to patients ineligible for warfarin treatment because of recurrent bleeding (20) or other warfarin-associated problems. The combined procedure is performed under general anesthesia with biplane fluoroscopy and TEE guidance. Catheter ablation is followed by implantation of the WATCHMAN LAA closure device. Data from a non-randomized trial with 10 patients demonstrates that this procedure can be safely performed in patients with a CHADS2 score of greater than 1 (21). Further studies to examine the effectiveness of the combined procedure in reducing symptoms from AF and associated stroke are therefore warranted.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Journal of Visualized Experiments
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    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2013
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    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2013
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    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2013
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    ABSTRACT: AimsHybrid myocardial perfusion imaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT coronary angiography (CCTA) has the potential to play a major role in patients with non-conclusive SPECT or CCTA results. We evaluated the performance of hybrid SPECT/CCTA vs. standalone SPECT and CCTA for the diagnosis of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with an intermediate to high pre-test likelihood of CAD.Methods and resultsIn total, 98 patients (mean age 62.5 ± 10.1 years, 68.4% male) with stable anginal complaints and a median pre-test likelihood of 87% (range 22-95%) were prospectively included in this study. Hybrid SPECT/CCTA was performed prior to conventional coronary angiography (CA) including fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. Hybrid analysis was performed by combined interpretation of SPECT and CCTA images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV), and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated for standalone SPECT, CCTA, and hybrid SPECT/CCTA on per patient level, using an FFR <0.80 as a reference for significant CAD. Significant CAD was demonstrated in 56 patients (57.9%). Non-conclusive SPECT or CCTA results were found in 32 (32.7%) patients. SPECT had a sensitivity of 93%, specificity 79%, PPV 85%, and NPV 89%. CCTA had a sensitivity of 98%, specificity 62%, PPV 77%, and NPV 96%. Hybrid analysis of SPECT and CCTA improved the overall performance: sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for the presence of significant CAD to 96, 95, 96, and 95%, respectively.Conclusions In > 40% of the patients with a high pre-test likelihood no significant CAD was demonstrated, emphasizing the value of accurate pre-treatment cardiovascular imaging. Hybrid SPECT/CCTA was able to accurately diagnose and exclude significant CAD surpassing standalone myocardial SPECT and CCTA, vs. a reference standard of FFR measurements.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether early atorvastatin treatment will reduce left ventricle (LV) remodeling, infarct size, and improve microvascular perfusion. Background: In animal studies, early statin therapy reduces reperfusion injury after a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: Forty-two consecutive patients (82% male, mean age 61.2 ± 9.8) who underwent a primary PCI for a first ST-elevated AMI were randomized for pretreatment with atorvastatin 80 mg (n = 20) or placebo (n = 22) and continued with the same dosage daily for 1 week. All patients received atorvastatin 80 mg once daily 7 days after primary PCI. The LV function and infarct size were measured by magnetic resonance imaging within 1 day, at 1 week, and 3 months follow up. The primary endpoint was the end-systolic volume index (ESVI) at 3 months. Secondary endpoints were global LV function measurements, myocardial infarct size, biochemical cardiac markers, TIMI flow, and ST-T elevation resolution. Results: ESVI 3 months after AMI was 25.1 mL/m(2) in the atorvastatin arm and 25.0 mL/m(2) in the placebo arm (P = 0.74). The differences in change from baseline to 3 months follow up in global LV function and myocardial infarct size did not differ between both treatment arms. Furthermore, biochemical markers, TIMI flow, and ST-T elevation resolution did not differ between atorvastatin and placebo arm. Conclusions: In this pilot study, pretreatment with atorvastatin in an acute myocardial infarction does not result in an improved cardiac function, microvascular perfusion, or decreased myocardial infarct size. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals Inc.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To evaluate to what extent treatment decisions for patients with stable angina pectoris can be made based on hybrid myocardial perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT) and CT coronary angiography (CCTA). It has been shown that hybrid SPECT/CCTA has good performance in the diagnosis of significant coronary artery disease (CAD). The question remains whether these imaging results lead to similar treatment decisions as compared to standalone SPECT and invasive coronary angiography (CA). Methods We prospectively included 107 patients (mean age 62.8±10.0 years, 69% male) with stable anginal complaints and an intermediate to high pre-test likelihood for CAD. Hybrid SPECT/CCTA was performed prior to CA in all patients. The study outcome was the treatment decision categorised as: no revascularisation, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Treatment decisions were made by two interventional cardiologists and one cardiothoracic surgeon in two steps: first, based on the results of hybrid SPECT/CCTA; second, based on SPECT and CA. Results Revascularisation (PCI or CABG) was indicated in 54 (50%) patients based on SPECT and CA. Percentage agreement of treatment decisions in all patients based on hybrid SPECT/CCTA versus SPECT and CA on the necessity of revascularisation was 92%. Percentage agreement of treatment decisions in patients with matched, unmatched and normal hybrid SPECT/CCTA findings was 95%, 84% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions Panel evaluation shows that patients could be accurately indicated for and deferred from revascularisation based on hybrid SPECT/CCTA.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · Heart (British Cardiac Society)
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    Martin J Swaans · Martijn C Post · Benno J W M Rensing · Lucas V.A. Boersma
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    ABSTRACT: Drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF) increasingly is being treated with catheter ablation. However, the long-term success rate, expressed as freedom from AF, is <50%. Therefore, vitamin K antagonists, with all their complications, remain necessary. Recently, left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion devices were introduced as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists. Here, we investigated whether AF ablation and LAA occlusion could be a feasible and safe combination in patients with symptomatic drug-refractory AF and a CHADS(2) score ≥1 or a contraindication for vitamin K antagonists. Ablation was performed by using multielectrode catheters with phased radiofrequency energy. LAA was occluded with the Watchman device (Atritech, Inc, Plymouth, MN). Between February 2010 and February 2011, 30 patients were treated (21 male; age, 62.8±8.5 years). Median CHADS(2) score was 2.5 (25th to 75th percentiles: 2 to 3), median CHADS-VASc score was 3 (25th to 75th percentiles: 3 to 5), 77% had prior stroke, and 27% had a contraindication for vitamin K antagonists. Median HAS-BLED score was 2 (range, 1 to 5). Successful device implantation was achieved with a median number of 1.5 devices (median diameter 24 mm [25th to 75th percentiles: 24 to 24 mm]). Total procedure time was 97 minutes (25th to 75th percentiles: 75 to 115 minutes). At 60 days, all patients met the criteria for successful sealing. Follow-up visit at 12 months showed a 30% rate of documented recurrence of AF. A repeated pulmonary vein isolation was performed successfully in 4 patients, without interference of the LAA closure device. No thromboembolic events occurred during 1-year follow-up. LAA occlusion with the Watchman device and AF ablation can be combined successfully and safely in a single procedure. The Watchman does not interfere with a repeated ablation.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Journal of the American Heart Association
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    ABSTRACT: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting millions of individuals worldwide, and a major risk factor for disabling cerebral embolic stroke. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, characterized by vascular abnormalities with high-bleeding tendency and therefore intolerance for oral anticoagulation. We report a case of percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage, which might be a good alternative strategy instead of chronic oral anticoagulation to protect patients with high-risk AF and HHT from cerebral embolic strokes.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary calcium scoring (CCS) adds to the diagnostic performance of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to assess the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients with a high pre-test likelihood are expected to have a high CCS which potentially could enhance the diagnostic performance of myocardial perfusion SPECT in this specific patient group. We evaluated the added value of CCS to SPECT in the diagnosis of significant CAD in patients with an intermediate to high pre-test likelihood. In total, 129 patients (mean age 62.7 ± 9.7 years, 65 % male) with stable anginal complaints and intermediate to high pre-test likelihood of CAD (median 87 %, range 22-95) were prospectively included in this study. All patients received SPECT and CCS imaging preceding invasive coronary angiography (CA). Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements were acquired from patients with angiographically estimated 50-95 % obstructive CAD. For SPECT a SSS > 3 was defined significant CAD. For CCS the optimal cut-off value for significant CAD was determined by ROC curve analysis. The reference standard for significant CAD was a FFR of <0.80 acquired by CA. Significant CAD was demonstrated in 64 patients (49.6 %). Optimal CCS cut-off value for significant CAD was >182.5. ROC curve analysis for prediction of the presence of significant CAD for SPECT, CCS and the combination of CCS and SPECT resulted in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.88 (95 % CI 81-94), 0.75 (95 % CI 66-83 %) and 0.92 (95 % CI 87-97 %) respectively. The difference of the AUC between SPECT and the combination of CCS and SPECT was 0.05 (P = 0.12). The addition of CCS did not significantly improve the diagnostic performance of SPECT in the evaluation of patients with a predominantly high pre-test likelihood of CAD.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2012 · The international journal of cardiovascular imaging
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    M J Swaans · M C Post · B J W M Rensing · L V A Boersma
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    ABSTRACT: Percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure can be an alternative to coumadin treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) at high risk for thromboembolic events and/or bleeding complications. We report the initial experience with this new technique. Patients were eligible if they had AF with a high stroke risk (CHADS(2) score >1), and/or contraindication for coumadin therapy. The procedure was performed under general anaesthesia, using biplane fluoroscopy and (3D) transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) guidance. Patients were discharged on coumadin until a TEE was repeated at 45 days after closure to evaluate LAA occlusion. If LAA occlusion was achieved, oral anticoagulation was discontinued and aspirin started. Percutaneous LAA closure was performed in 10 patients (50% male, age 61.6 ± 9.6 years). The median CHADS(2) score was 3 (range 2-4), median CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score 3.5 (range 2-6) and HAS-BLED score 1.5 (range 1-4). Nine patients had a history of stroke and 2 patients had a history of major bleeding while on coumadin. Concomitant pulmonary vein isolation was performed in 9 patients. The device was successfully placed in all patients within a median of 56 min (38-137 min). Asymptomatic catheter thrombus occurred in one patient. At 45-day follow-up, no thromboembolic events occurred, TEE showed minimal residual flow in the LAA in three patients. In one patient the LAA device was dislocated, requiring successful percutaneous retrieval. Device closure of the LAA may provide an alternative strategy to chronic coumadin therapy in patients with AF and high risk of stroke and/or bleeding complications using coumadin.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · Netherlands heart journal: monthly journal of the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Heart Foundation
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to assess the feasibility and safety of percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve (MV) repair in patients with an unacceptably high operative risk. MV repair for mitral regurgitation (MR) can be accomplished by use of a clip that approximates the free edges of the mitral leaflets. All patients were declined for surgery because of a high logistic EuroSCORE (>20%) or the presence of other specific surgical risk factors. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed before and 6 months after the procedure. Differences in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, quality of life (QoL) using the Minnesota questionnaire, and 6-min walk test (6-MWT) distances were reported. Fifty-five procedures were performed in 52 patients (69.2% male, age 73.2 ± 10.1 years, logistic EuroSCORE 27.1 ± 17.0%). In 3 patients, partial clip detachment occurred; a second clip was placed successfully. One patient experienced cardiac tamponade. Two patients developed inguinal bleeding, of whom 1 needed surgery. Six patients (11.5%) died during 6-month follow-up (5 patients as a result of progressive heart failure and 1 noncardiac death). The MR grade before repair was ≥3 in 100%; after 6 months, a reduction in MR grade to ≤2 was present in 79% of the patients. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic diameter, LV ejection fraction, and systolic pulmonary artery pressure improved significantly. Accompanied improvements in NYHA functional class, QoL index, 6-MWT distances, and log N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide were observed. In a high-risk population, MR reduction can be achieved by percutaneous edge-to-edge valve repair, resulting in LV remodeling with improvement of functional capacity after 6 months.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · JACC. Cardiovascular Interventions

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Journal of Nuclear Cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the safety and efficacy of the Genous™ endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) capturing stent in conjunction with HmG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) to stimulate EPC recruitment, in the treatment of patients with de novo coronary artery lesions. The HEALING IIB study was a multi-center, prospective trial, including 100 patients. The primary efficacy endpoint was late luminal loss by QCA at 6-month follow-up (FU). Although statin therapy increased relative EPC levels by 5.6-fold, the angiographic outcome at 6 month FU was not improved in patients with an overall in-stent late luminal loss of 0.76±0.50 mm. The composite major adverse cardiac events (MACE) rate was 9.4%, whereas 6.3% clinically justified target lesion revascularizations (TLRs) were observed. 2 Patients died within the first 30 days after stent implantation due to angiographically verified in-stent thrombosis. At 12 month FU, MACE and TLR increased to 15.6% and 11.5% respectively and stabilized until 24 month FU. 18 Month angiographic FU showed a significant decrease in late luminal loss (0.67±0.54, 11.8% reduction or 10% by matched serial analysis, P=0.001). The HEALING IIB study suggests that statin therapy in combination with the EPC capture stent does not contribute to a reduction of in-stent restenosis formation for the treatment of de novo coronary artery disease. Although concomitant statin therapy was able to stimulate EPC recruitment, it did not improve the angiographic outcome of the bio-engineered EPC capture stent. Remarkably, angiographic late loss was significantly reduced between 6 and 18 months.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2011 · Atherosclerosis

Publication Stats

6k Citations
761.35 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004-2015
    • St. Antonius Ziekenhuis
      • Department of Cardiology
      Nieuwegen, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 2002-2011
    • Antonius Ziekenhuis
      Sneek, Friesland, Netherlands
  • 2003
    • University of Groningen
      Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • 2002-2003
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Cardiology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1988-2002
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • Department of Cardiology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1998
    • University of Minnesota Rochester
      Рочестер, Minnesota, United States