Oldrich Sychra

University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Brünn, South Moravian, Czech Republic

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Publications (80)

  • MIROSLAV VALAN · OLDRICH SYCHRA · IVAN LITERAK
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Two species of the chewing louse genus Ricinus are redescribed and illustrated: Ricinus dalgleishi Nelson, 1972 from Helmitheros vermivorum (Gmelin, 1789), a new host-louse association, and Ricinus tanagraephilus Eichler, 1956 from Euphonia laniirostris d'Orbigny & Lafresnaye, 1837. Also, new host-louse associations are recorded for Ricinus vireoen-sis Nelson, 1972 from Vireo pallens Salvin, 1863, and for females of an unidentified species of Ricinus sp. from Corytho-pis delalandi (Lesson, 1831), which are described and illustrated.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Zootaxa
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    Tomas Najer · Daniel R Gustafsson · Oldrich Sychra
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Two new species of the louse genus Philopteroides Mey, 2004 are described and illustrated from two host species of painted berrypeckers, endemic to New Guinea: Philopteroides sinancorellus n. sp. ex Oreocharis arfaki (Meyer, 1875) (tit ber-rypecker), and Philopteroides gigas n. sp. ex Paramythia montium De Vis, 1892 (crested berrypecker). Both louse species belong to the beckeri species-group based on their short, broad preantennal areas, and shallow median indentations of the hyaline margin. The description of these two new species brings the total number of Philopteroides species to 15. An amended key to the beckeri species-group is included.
    Full-text Article · Jul 2016 · Zootaxa
  • OLDRICH SYCHRA · STANISLAV KOLENCIK · RICARDO L. PALMA
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Myrsidea ivanliteraki new species, M. novaeseelandiae new species, and M. hihi new species are described and illustrated from New Zealand birds, with Gymnorhina tibicen, Anthornis melanura and Notiomystis cincta as type hosts respectively. Also, Myrsidea vincula is redescribed and illustrated from one sample ex Strepera fuliginosa from Australia. Keys for the identification of females and males of the five species of Myrsidea recorded from New Zealand are also given.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Zootaxa
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The new species Myrsidea alexanderi is described and illustrated ex Pheugopedius maculipectus (Troglodytidae) from Honduras. Redescriptions and illustrations are given for both sexes of Myrsidea chiapensis ex Calocitta formosa from Costa Rica, and the male of M. dissimilis ex Progne chalybea from Brazil. Also, seven other previously known species or subspecies of the louse genus Myrsidea are recorded and discussed from passerine birds of the Neotropical Region, as follows: Myrsidea antiqua, Myrsidea balteri, Myrsidea diffusa, Myrsidea nesomimi borealis, Myrsidea paleno, Myrsidea psittaci and Myrsidea serini. Our data increase knowledge of intraspecific morphological variability within these species, and also of their host and geographical distribution. New host-louse associations are: Agelaioides badius for M. psittaci; Basileuterus culicivorus and Myiothlypis leucoblephara for M. paleno; Mimus saturninus for M. nesomimi borealis; and Icterus dominicensis and Molothrus rufoaxillaris for Myrsidea sp.
    Full-text Article · Mar 2016 · Zootaxa
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    Miroslav Valan · Oldrich Sychra · Ivan Literak
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We revised a collection of chewing lice deposited at the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg, Russia. We studied 60 slides with 107 specimens of 10 species of the genus Ricinus (De Geer, 1778). The collection includes lectotype specimens of Ricinus ivanovi Blagoveshtchensky, 1951 and of Ricinus tugarinovi Blagoveshtchensky, 1951. We registered Ricinus elongatus Olfers, 1816 ex Turdus ruficollis, R. ivanovi ex Leucosticte tephrocotis and Ricinus serratus (Durrant, 1906) ex Calandrella acutirostris and Calandrella cheleensis which were not included in Price's world checklist. New records for Russia are R. elongatus ex Turdus ruficollis; Ricinus fringillae De Geer, 1778 ex Emberiza aureola, Emberiza leucocephalos, Emberiza rustica, Passer montanus and Prunella modularis; Ricinus rubeculae De Geer, 1778 ex Erithacus rubecula and Luscinia svecica; Ricinus serratus (Durrant, 1906) ex Alauda arvensis. New records for Kyrgyzstan are R. fringillae ex E. leucocephalos and ex Fringilla coelebs. A new record for Tajikistan is R. serratus ex Calandrella acutirostris. The new species Ricinus vaderi Valan n. sp. is described with Calandra lark, Melanocorypha calandra; from Azerbaijan, as a type host. © M. Valan et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.
    Full-text Article · Feb 2016 · Parasite
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Wild birds are common hosts of ticks and can transport them for long distances, contributing to the spreading of tick-borne pathogens. The information about ticks on birds and tick-borne pathogens in Greece is limited. The present study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and species of ticks infesting wild resident birds (mostly small passerines) in Greece, and to assess Borrelia and Rickettsia infection in the collected ticks. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. was performed by nested PCR targeting the flaB gene. Rickettsia spp. were detected by PCR targeting the gltA and ompA genes. Seven (2 %) out of 403 birds examined in northern Greece in 2013 were infested with 15 ticks, identified as Ixodes frontalis, Ixodes acuminatus, Hyalomma marginatum, Hyalomma aegyptium and Hyalomma sp. All ticks were negative for Borrelia spp. while four of them were positive for rickettsiae (Rickettsia aeschlimannii in H. aegyptium and Rickettsia sp. in I. frontalis, H. aegyptium and H. marginatum). Ixodes acuminatus is reported for the first time in Greece and Sylvia borin is reported as a new host record for I. acuminatus.
    Article · Feb 2016 · Parasitology Research
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We examined the presence of borreliae and rickettsiae bacteria in ticks from wild passerine birds on three islands of the Archipelago of the Azores, the westernmost region of Palearctic. A total of 266 birds belonging to eight species from seven families were examined on São Miguel, Santa Maria and Graciosa islands in 2013. Ticks collected from these birds consisted of 55 Ixodes frontalis (22 larvae, 32 nymphs, 1 adult female) and 16 Haemaphysalis punctata nymphs. Turdus merula and Erithacus rubecula were the birds most infested with both tick species. Three T. merula in Santa Maria were infested with 4 I. frontalis infected with Borrelia turdi. No rickettsiae were found in the ticks. We report for the first time the presence of I. frontalis and B. turdi on the Azores islands and we showed that the spatial distribution reaches further west than previously thought. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
    Full-text Article · May 2015 · Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to document the presence of Rickettsia spp. in ticks parasitizing wild birds in Costa Rica. Birds were trapped at seven locations in Costa Rica during 2004, 2009, and 2010; then visually examined for the presence of ticks. Ticks were identified, and part of them was tested individually for the presence of Rickettsia spp. by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers targeting fragments of the rickettsial genes gltA and ompA. PCR products were DNA-sequenced and analyzed in BLAST to determine similarities with previously reported rickettsial agents. A total of 1878 birds were examined, from which 163 birds (9%) were infested with 388 ticks of the genera Amblyomma and Ixodes. The following Amblyomma (in decreasing order of abundance) were found in immature stages (larvae and nymphs): Amblyomma longirostre, Amblyomma calcaratum, Amblyomma coelebs, Amblyomma sabanerae, Amblyomma varium, Amblyomma maculatum, and Amblyomma ovale. Ixodes ticks were represented by Ixodes minor and two unclassified species, designated here as Ixodes sp. genotype I, and Ixodes sp. genotype II. Twelve of 24 tested A. longirostre ticks were found to be infected with 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii', and 2 of 4 A. sabanerae were found to be infected with Rickettsia bellii. Eight of 10 larval Ixodes minor were infected with an endosymbiont (a novel Rickettsia sp. agent) genetically related to the Ixodes scapularis endosymbiont. No rickettsial DNA was found in A. calcaratum, A. coelebs, A. maculatum, A. ovale, A. varium, Ixodes sp. I, and Ixodes sp. II. We report the occurrence of I. minor in Costa Rica for the first time and a number of new bird host-tick associations. Moreover, 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' and R. bellii were found in A. longirostre and A. sabanerae, respectively, in Costa Rica for the first time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
    Full-text Article · Apr 2015 · Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
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    Pedro Rodrigues · Sergey Mironov · Oldrich Sychra · [...] · Ivan Literak
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. © P. Rodrigues et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2015.
    Full-text Article · Feb 2015 · Parasite
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    Jana Martinů · Oldřich Sychra · Ivan Literák · [...] · Jan Stefka
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Parasites with wide host spectra provide opportunities to study the ecological parameters of speciation, as well as the process of the evolution of host specificity. The speciose and cosmopolitan louse genus Menacanthus comprises both multi-host and specialised species, allowing exploration of the ecological and historical factors affecting the evolution of parasites using a comparative approach. We used phylogenetic analysis to reconstruct evolutionary relationships in 14 species of Menacanthus based on the sequences of one mitochondrial and one nuclear gene. The results allowed us to validate species identification based on morphology, as well as to explore host distribution by assumed generalist and specialist species. Our analyses confirmed a narrow host use for several species, however in some cases, the supposed host specialists had a wider host spectrum than anticipated. In one case a host generalist (Menacanthuseurysternus) was clustered terminally on a clade almost exclusively containing host specialists. Such a clade topology indicates that the process of host specialisation may not be irreversible in parasite evolution. Finally, we compared patterns of population genetic structure, geographic distribution and host spectra between two selected species, M. eurysternus and Menacanthus camelinus, using haplotype networks. Menacanthus camelinus showed limited geographical distribution in combination with monoxenous host use, whereas M. eurysternus showed a global distribution and lack of host specificity. It is suggested that frequent host switching maintains gene flow between M. eurysternus populations on unrelated hosts in local populations. However, gene flow between geographically distant localities was restricted, suggesting that geography rather than host-specificity is the main factor defining the global genetic diversity of M. eurysternus.
    Full-text Article · Jan 2015 · International Journal for Parasitology
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    Ali Halajian · Oldrich Sychra · Wilmien J Luus-Powell · [...] · Ivo Papousek
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A total of 778 individuals of 150 bird species were examined: 123 (16 %) individuals of 40 non-passerine bird species belonging to 16 orders; and 655 (84 %) individuals of 110 passerine bird species (Passeriformes) belonging to 28 families. A total of 2041 chewing lice belonging to nine genera were found on passerine birds. Amblyceran lice were less frequent than ischnoceran lice (32.8 % vs 67.2 %, n = 2041). A total of 670 amblyceran lice (mean intensity = 5.0) were found on 133 passerine birds (20.3 %) of 43 species. The dominant amblyceran genus was Menacanthus with a dominance of 59.3 %, while the other two genera were less frequent: Myrsidea (36.9 %) and Ricinus (3.9 %). A total of 50 amblyceran louse–host associations were recorded. An equal overall sex ratio as well as age ratio was found among the collected lice. An updated checklist of the species of amblyceran lice from passerine birds from South Africa is included and discussed. Two families, five genera and 32 species of lice are listed from 42 passerine bird hosts. Key words: chewing lice, Colpocephalum, Machaerilaemus, Menacanthus, Myrsidea, Ricinus, Amblycera, Menoponidae, Passeriformes, South Africa, prevalence, sex ratio, checklist.
    Full-text Article · Dec 2014 · African Entomology
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    Oldrich Sychra · Ali Halajian · Wilmien J Luus-Powell · [...] · Ivo Papousek
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A total of 655 individuals of 110 passerine species belonging to 28 families were examined for chewing lice in South Africa. A total of 80 (12 %) birds of 33 species were parasitized with amblyceran chewing lice (Phthiraptera: Amblycera) belonging to three genera: Menacanthus, Myrsidea and Ricinus. In this paper we report the occurrence of 11 species of chewing lice identified from 38 birds of 16 species. Three samples of chewing lice containing only nymphs were identified to the generic level only. Description and illustrations are given for Myrsidea oatleyi Sychra & Halajian, sp. n. ex Pogonocichla stellata (Vieillot, 1818) (Muscicapidae). Our data represent the first louse records for Lanius collaris Linnaeus, 1766 (Laniidae), Cossypha dichroa (Gmelin, 1789) and Pogonocichla stellata (Muscicapidae), and Andropadus importunus (Vieillot, 1818) and Chlorocichla flaviventris (A. Smith, 1834) (Pycnonotidae). Records of new host–louse associations are: Cecropis abyssinica (Guérin-Meneville, 1843) (Hirundinidae) for Myrsidea rustica (Giebel, 1874); Cossypha dichroa (Muscicapidae) for Ricinus mugimaki (Uchida, 1915); Lanius collaris (Laniidae) for Menacanthus camelinus (Nitzsch [in Giebel], 1874); Ploceus intermedius Rüppell, 1845 (Ploceidae) for Myrsidea textoris Klockenhoff, 1984; and Prinia flavicans (Vieillot, 1820) (Cisticolidae) for Menacanthus curuccae (Schrank, 1776). A portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene for some species of chewing lice was sequenced in order to assess their genetic divergences. Key words: chewing lice, new species, Menacanthus, Myrsidea, Ricinus, Menoponidae, South Africa, passerines, new host–louse associations, sequence, mitochondrial COI.
    Full-text Article · Oct 2014 · African Entomology
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Abstract Focusing upon chewing lice parasitizing blackcaps in the Azores (Portugal), we found a lower number of louse species in the Azores compared to mainland Europe. Only chewing lice host-specific to blackcaps were found in the Azores. Louse prevalences were much higher in blackcaps from the Azores compared to those observed in various mainland populations. Chewing lice are permanent parasites of birds, and for such parasites the parasite island syndrome could be characterized by higher parasite prevalence on the islands compared to the mainland.
    Full-text Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Parasitology
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    Sergey V Mironov · Ivan Literak · Oldrich Sychra · Miroslav Capek
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Two new species of the feather mite family Gabucinidae (Acari: Astigmata) are described from birds of the family Troglodytidae (Passeriformes) from Central America: Piciformobia cinnycerthiae sp. nov. from Cinnycerthia unirufa (Lafresnaye) in Ecuador, and P. henicorhinae sp. nov. from Henicorhina leucosticte (Cabanis) in Costa Rica. These are the first records of mites of the genus Piciformobia Gaud et Atyeo, 1975 from passerine hosts. A renewed diagnosis of the genus Piciformobia and key to all known species are provided.
    Full-text Article · Oct 2014 · Acta Parasitologica
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Hyalomma ticks are well-known vectors transmitting infectious agents, which can result in severe and potentially fatal diseases in humans. Migratory birds may carry infected ticks over long distances. Here, we report on records of ticks of the H. marginatum complex in birds from Central Europe during the spring migration in 2008–2012. A total of 1172 birds belonging to 32 species, 16 families, and 3 orders was examined for ticks. Sixteen individuals of 6 passerine species were found to transport 30 ticks, identified as individuals belonging to the H. marginatum species complex (consisting of H. isaaci, H. marginatum sensu stricto, H. rufipes, H. turanicum, and H. glabrum) during 5 spring seasons. Infested bird species included the great reed warbler Acrocephalus arundinaceus, the Eurasian reed warbler A. scirpaceus, the marsh warbler A. palustris, the sedge warbler A. schoenobaenus, Savi's warbler Locustella luscinioides, and the common nightingale Luscinia megarhynchos. All of these Central European breeders are migratory species wintering in Africa. To our knowledge, this is the first study to record ticks of the H. marginatum complex on the great reed warbler and Savi's warbler.
    Full-text Article · Sep 2014 · Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
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    Oldrich Sychra · Filip Kounek · Tomas Najer · [...] · Ivan Literak
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A total of 6564 individuals of 482 species of passerine birds were examined between the years 2004 and 2013 at various locations in central Europe, Africa, the Neotropical Region and Vietnam. A total of 663 birds (10.1%) of 141 species were parasitized with 3648 chewing lice of the genus Myrsidea (mean intensity was 5.5 lice per bird). Myrsidea was found as eudominant genus with a total dominance of 24.3% (a total of 15030 lice were determined). Dominance of Myrsidea ranged between 0.9% (central Europe) and 51.8% (Neotropical Region). We suggest that Myrsidea is probably less tolerant to arid conditions compared to other chewing louse genera. A total of 93 (66%, n=141) records represent new host-louse associations. We found examples of bird species harbouring two different species of Myrsidea. In these cases, each species was found either in a different geographical location or in the same location but on different host individuals. Conversely, we found also examples of one species of Myrsidea parasitizing two different host species. Such host-switching events between unrelated hosts are possible on condition that different bird species share similar behaviour and ecology. Our findings highlight the need to (1) carefully examine each louse specimen when identifying new samples of Myrsidea, (2) compare them with species of Myrsidea from the same and related host families, and (3) compare them with species of Myrsidea from unrelated hosts living in the same geographical region.
    Full-text Conference Paper · Aug 2014
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    Oldřich Sychra · Filip Kounek · Ivo Papoušek · [...] · Ivan Literák
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A total of 114 individuals of 14 wren species (Aves: Passeriformes: Troglodytidae) were examined. Nineteen birds (17 %) of six species were parasitised with 292 chewing lice (mean intensity = 15.4 lice per bird) belonging to three genera – Brueelia Kéler, 1936, Penenirmus Clay & Meinertzhagen, 1938 (Ischnocera: Philopteridae) and Myrsidea Waterston, 1915 (Amblycera: Menoponidae). Data on the occurrence of chewing lice on wrens, including geographical distributions and some parasitological parameters – such as prevalence and mean intensity – are updated and discussed. A description and illustrations are given for Myrsidea fasciata sp. nov. from Campylorhynchus fasciatus (Swainson, 1837) from Costa Rica. Penenirmus albiventris (Scopoli, 1763) is redescribed from Troglodytes troglodytes (Linnaeus, 1758) (from the Czech Republic and Slovakia) and from T. aedon Vieillot, 1809 (from Peru). Intraspeci􀂿 c morphological variation of P. albiventris is discussed, and detailed 􀂿 gures are given. A portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene was sequenced from some species of Myrsidea and Penenirmus in order to assess their relative genetic divergence. An updated list of all species of lice recorded from wrens, including their geographic distribution, and a host-louse list are also given.
    Full-text Article · May 2014 · Acta Entomologica Musei Nationalis Pragae
  • TOMAS NAJER · OLDRICH SYCHRA · FILIP KOUNEK · [...] · NGUYEN MANH HUNG
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A total of 239 individuals of 50 bird species were examined for chewing lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) in southern Vietnam. Fifty-six birds of 20 species were parasitised by 15 species of lice belonging to 10 genera from two suborders, Amblycera: Menacanthus, Meromenopon, Myrsidea, and Ischnocera: Alcedoecus, Brueelia, Cuculicola, Meropoecus, Penenirmus, Philopteroides and Philopterus. Thirteen louse samples from Passeriformes were identified to genus only because they contain inadequate material. A total of 29 host-louse associations were found, of which nine are new, including: (1) two new species of the genus Brueelia, which are described and named in this paper: Brueelia binhchauensis from Megalaima lineata (Vieillot, 1816) (Piciformes: Megalaimidae), and Brueelia malacocincla from Malacocincla abbotti Blyth, 1845 (Passeriformes: Pellorneidae); (2) first records of lice from Cyornis hainanus (Ogilvie-Grant, 1900); and (3) the first record of Myrsidea claytoni Hellenthal & Price, 2003 from Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos (Gmelin, 1788) (Passeriformes: Eurylaimidae), here regarded as a case of natural host-switching. A portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene for some species of chewing lice was sequenced in order to assess their genetic divergences.
    Article · Jan 2014 · Zootaxa
  • Oldrich- Sychra · Tomas Najer · Filip Kounek · [...] · Oleg O Tolstenkov
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Abstract Thirty-two black-and-red broadbill Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos were examined for chewing lice in Vietnam. All birds examined were parasitized by Myrsidea claytoni. Mean abundance was 27.3, with intensity range 5-80 lice per bird. This is the first report of a Myrsidea from this host, although the females differ slightly from the original description of M. claytoni from Pycnonotus eutilotus in the shape of metanotum and of tergites I-II. So this is also the first record of 1 species of Myrsidea from 2 very distantly related hosts. While the original hosts of M. claytoni belong to the family Pycnonotidae, C. macrorhynchos is a member of the family Eurylaimidae representing the Old World Suboscines, which are considered as a basal lineage among passerines. Therefore, our record represents an interesting case of natural host-switching. The high prevalence as well as the intensity of infestation show that M. claytoni is well established on C. macrorhynchos in Vietnam.
    Article · Jan 2014 · Journal of Parasitology
  • Oldrich Sychra · Filip Kounek · Ivo Papousek · [...] · Ivan Literak
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A total of 114 individuals of 14 wren species (Ayes: Passeriformes: Troglodytidae) were examined. Nineteen birds (17 %) of six species were parasitised with 292 chewing lice (mean intensity = 15.4 lice per bird) belonging to three genera - Brueelia Keler, 1936, Penenirmus Clay & Meinertzhagen, 1938 (Ischnocera: Philopteridae) and Myrsidea Waterston, 1915 (Amblycera: Menoponidae). Data on the occurrence of chewing lice on wrens, including geographical distributions and some parasitological parameters - such as prevalence and mean intensity - are updated and discussed. A description and illustrations are given for Myrsidea fasciata sp. nov. from Campylorhynchus fasciatus (Swainson, 1837) from Costa Rica. Penenirmus albiventris (Scopoli, 1763) is redescribed from Troglodytes troglodytes (Linnaeus, 1758) (from the Czech Republic and Slovakia) and from T. aedon Vieillot, 1809 (from Peru). Intraspecific morphological variation of albiventris is discussed, and detailed figures are given. A portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene was sequenced from some species of Myrsidea and Penenirmus in order to assess their relative genetic divergence. An updated list of all species of lice recorded from wrens, including their geographic distribution, and a host-louse list are also given.
    Article · Jan 2014 · Acta Entomologica Musei Nationalis Pragae

Publication Stats

361 Citations

Institutions

  • 2003-2005
    • University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno
      • Department of Biology and Wildlife Diseases
      Brünn, South Moravian, Czech Republic