Anil Mital

University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

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Publications (134)109.26 Total impact


  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2015
  • Source
    Dataset: IIE 2008
    Anand Subramanian · Anil Mital

    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Functional design plays a central role in ensuring design quality and product innovation as products with problems in their main functions do not sell well, no matter how sophisticated their details. Numerous examples exist of products marketed and sold as sophisticated in the features they provide customers that routinely fail to perform the intended functions or do so in a very unsatisfactory manner. The recognition that design decisions made early in the product development cycle can have a significant effect on the manufacturability, quality, product cost, and product introduction time ultimately ensures success in the marketplace. This chapter evaluates the guidelines for ensuring product functionality through the use of questionnaires and tests. The results that are recorded are subjective measurements as there is a general lack of standard. New directions for developing the mechanism of product function review are needed. Manufacturing measures resulting in conflicting outcomes need further analysis. Efforts should be focused on identifying design guidelines to provide better solutions for different situations. In this context, the function review system is discussed, which involves gathering and evaluating objective knowledge about product design functionality and concrete plans for making it a reality, suggesting improvements at each point, and confirming that the process is ready to proceed to the next phase.
    No preview · Chapter · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Jan 2014

  • No preview · Chapter · Jan 2014
  • Anoop Desai · Anil Mital
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    ABSTRACT: A systematic methodology that seeks to enhance ease of maintenance of industrial equipment and machinery has been presented in this paper. The methodology relies heavily on methods time measurement (MTM) systems as well as makes extensive use of design for X principles to accomplish design modifications. It is well known that maintenance is often a necessary evil because it is responsible equipment downtime, but needs to be done anyway. The reason is that lack of regular maintenance often results in serious equipment failure. This can lead to a variety of consequences including quality problems, safety problems and most important of all lower productivity and increased product costs. The methodology presented in this paper deals with product design for maintenance. The one salient feature of this methodology is that it takes into account the labour-intensive nature of the maintenance operation in general and incorporates appropriate ergonomic factors to reflect this consideration. MTM principles are used in order to impart a degree of objectivity to the methodology in terms of time evaluation. The relationship between maintenance time and product design characteristics is also established. This paper can be distinctly divided into two sections. The first part introduces the reader to some important maintenance-related concepts. The second part of this paper presents the aforementioned methodology. A real-life case study using an actual consumer product is also used towards the end of this paper to help corroborate the practical value of the methodology.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2011 · International Journal of Industrial and Systems Engineering
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    Anand Subramanian · Anil Mital
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    ABSTRACT: Disability and rehabilitation research and practices have traditionally aimed at creating self-sufficiency, along with equal opportunities among individuals with disabilities. The need and benefits of such initiatives are important, particularly with the increasing influx of disabled individuals into the work force. It has become necessary focus on rehabilitating the disabled and special populations at the work place and to do it in an economically viable manner without adversely affecting productivity. Work standards have traditionally served as a reliable means of establishing consistent data on activity and job completion times for comparative, control, or remuneration purposes. Yet with the changing demographics, it is necessary that the standard times and the work measurement data developed for healthy population is tailored to fit the requirements of special populations. This experimental study aimed at providing modifiers to elemental tasks when performed by individuals with finger disabilities. These modifiers should provide the management with information necessary to integrate the disabled into the workforce. The study reported here simulated three kinds of finger disabilities while performing various assembly-disassembly tasks. Results indicated that there was a significant increase in performance times with disabilities, both at the elemental level and at the higher level. While the elemental time with disabilities increased by as much as one-hundred fifty percent, overall times with disabilities increased by as much as one hundred eight percent. Based on the results of the experimental simulation, generalized modifiers for PMTS tasks were developed in order to estimate performance times for individuals with finger disabilities. Significance: PMTS modifiers are developed to accommodate individuals with finger disabilities in the work place.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2009 · International Journal of Industrial Engineering
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    Anand Subramanian · Anil Mital
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    ABSTRACT: MTM multipliers are developed for higher level tasks such as manual lifting, lowering, carrying and assembly with hands, as well as manual tools. These MTM multipliers and those developed in the previous work were applied to estimate the cycle time of individuals with finger disabilities for a combination assembly and handling task. Once the cycle time was estimated, the actual task was performed and the performance cycle time was determined from video analysis. The estimated and observed cycle times were compared. Additionally, estimated and observed elemental times were compared. The results of statistical comparison indicated that the difference between the estimated and actual cycle times was insignificant (! " 0.10). Further, elemental times based on observation were not significantly different from those estimated from multipliers established in the earlier work and the work presented here. Significance: MTM PMTS multipliers are provided for complex higher level tasks performed by individuals with finger disabilities. These multipliers were validated.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2009 · International Journal of Industrial Engineering
  • Source
    Anand Subramanian · Anil Mital
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    ABSTRACT: About 14% of the adult population in the USA is disabled (either partially or totally). There is a continuous influx of partially disabled population into the workforce. This results in a growing need to rehabilitate and provide better working conditions for the disabled individuals at the work place. This has not only necessitated a change in approach but also the need to investigate and analyse the economic implications on the functioning of the business model. Productivity measurement is a key element in understanding the social and economic well-being. This paper reviews the need to understand the relationship between productivity and the disabled individual. The goal here is to understand how the disability has a direct impact on the productivity of the organisation and the creation of accurate work standards can help determine this productivity-disability relationship.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2009 · International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management
  • Wen Chuan Chiang · Anil Mital · Anoop Desai
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    ABSTRACT: This research presents a systematic procedure to generate design and manufacturing guidelines to ensure product functionality. We critically examine product design and manufacture literature with a view to understanding why consumer products of daily use, supposed to be functional, routinely fail to provide the intended function to users' satisfaction. The traditional definitions of functionality, and the methods and tools used in representing function in a product need to be extended. There are manufacturing considerations that have a direct impact on making the product. Two sets of specific checklists, one for evaluating product functionality and the other consisting of design and manufacture guidelines, were developed. Information necessary for developing these checklists was obtained through sources such as users, manufacturers, published literature, and design handbooks. To evaluate the effectiveness of the checklists, it was hypothesised that all product functionality scores, considered collectively, would not differ between users and designers. To illustrate the utility of the procedure, a case study has been presented.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2009 · International Journal of Product Development
  • Anoop Desai · Anil Mital
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    ABSTRACT: Product quality constitutes a highly crucial component of product design, directly affecting consumer loyalty and company profitability. Historically, manufacturing enterprises have relied on the reactive approach of 'inspecting quality' into a product so it may 'conform' to design specifications. While this approach has its own advantages, its principal limitation lies in the manufacturers' implicit resignation to the fact that quality needs to be inspected since it cannot be built into product design at the design stage. However, there has been a gradual, yet definite transition from a reactive to a proactive strategy to managing quality by incorporating design techniques that do away with the largely unproductive inspection process. Several leading manufacturing enterprises have been successful in entirely eliminating the need to inspect by adopting a proactive approach to product design. This paper examines and reviews the need and strategic importance of this transition.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2009 · International Journal of Product Development

Publication Stats

1k Citations
109.26 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1982-2009
    • University of Cincinnati
      • • College of Medicine
      • • School of Education
      Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
  • 2002
    • Xavier University
      Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
  • 1986
    • Louisiana State University
      • Department of Industrial Engineering
      Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States