Martin Hill

Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven, North Brabant, Netherlands

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Publications (7)10.12 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We reported the record CW performance of an electrical injection metallic subwavelength-cavity laser with linewidth down to 0.54 nm at room temperature. The instrument-limited linewidth is about one eighth of our previously reported value.
    Full-text · Article · May 2012
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    Meint K Smit · Jos van der Tol · Martin Hill
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    ABSTRACT: A review of the complexity development of InP-based Photonic ICs is given. Similarities and differences between photonic and microelectronic integration technology are discussed and a vision of the development of photonic integration in the coming decade is given. A review of the complexity development of InP-based Photonic ICs is given. Similarities and differences between photonic and microelectronic integration technology are discussed and a vision of the development of photonic integration in the coming decade is given.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Laser & Photonics Review
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    ABSTRACT: We report the first room temperature, continuous wave operation of the electrical injection nanolasers with subwavelength cavity. The lasing mode is confined in an InP/InGaAs-SiN-Silver cavity of rectangular cross section operating at 1.55 μm.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2011
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    ABSTRACT: A multistate optical memory based on serially interconnected lasers is presented. We show that only one of the lasers can lase at a time, thus, the state of the optical memory is determined by the wavelength of the dominant laser. The light from the dominant laser suppresses its neighboring lasers through gain saturation, but still receives amplification by the active element of the suppressed lasers, compensating for coupling losses. This light passes through each of the successive lasers, simultaneously suppressing and being amplified. By this mechanism, all other lasers are suppressed. A five-state optical memory based on this concept is experimentally demonstrated. The contrast ratio between different states is over 30 dB. Dynamic flip-flop operation based on two different all-optical switching methods is also demonstrated.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2005 · IEEE Photonics Technology Letters
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    ABSTRACT: Photonic integration technology is a key enabler for large-scale application of photonic technology in broadband telecommunication networks, health care, metrology, sensors and ultrafast signal processing,. Trends in photonic integration technology will be discussed. Introduction. The field of Information and Communication Technologies is showing a development speed which is unprecedented in history. Over a period of more than thirty years key features like processor speed and memory size are roughly doubling each 18 months, and experts believe that this development will continue in the coming decade. It is known as Moore's law and enabled by the development of micro-electronic integration technology. Due to this development a steadily increasing performance of components and systems can be offered at an essentially constant price, a development that we recognise in the fact that the price of our new PC does not differ much from what we paid three years earlier for the previous one, which was four times slower. This dynamics has become a major driver for the ICT market, which would collapse without this steady innovation. Moore's law in micro-photonics. For Photonics to play a substantial role in the ICT market it will have to follow the same dynamics. The increase in functionality prescribed by Moore's law can only be sustained by applying an integration technology that supports a steady reduction of circuit size and fabrication costs. As such Indium- Phosphide based integration technology is the most powerful technology because it supports the integration of almost all functions required in ICT applications: light generation and detection in the wavelength window from 1300-1600 nm in which the attenuation and dispersion properties of optical fibres are optimal. And optical amplification, modulation, switching signal regeneration and wavelength conversion, to mention just a few examples. And, not to forget, high speed electronic functions. It is, therefore, the material of choice for a versatile photonic integration technology. Inspection of the development of component densities suggests that Moore's law is also valid in photonics, but with a time delay of around 30 years and with a much larger spread due to the large variation in photonic devices and technologies. In our lab, for example, we went from a typical component density of 1/cm 2 around 1988 (1) via 25 in 1996 (2) to 200 in 2000 (3) and 1000 in 2004 (4) which fits fairly well to Moore's law.
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    ABSTRACT: The integration scale in Photonic Integrated Circuits will be pushed to VLSI-level in the coming decade. Key technologies for reduction of device dimensions are high resolution lithography and deep waveguide etching technology. In this paper developments in Photonic Integration are reviewed and the limits for reduction of device dimensions are discussed. ©2004 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (130.3120) Integrated optics devices, (130.5990) Integrated Optics: Semiconductors Introduction. The title that the IPRA Programme Committee suggested for this presentation was: "Photonic integrated circuits with deeply etched waveguides". Deep etching causes a strong lateral confinement of light. Deep etched waveguides can be narrower and, what is more important, they show much lower bending loss than shallow etched waveguides. Even with a very small radius (< 10 µm) they can be used for low-loss interconnection. This allows for a strong reduction of the size of interconnection circuits. Further, deep etched MMI-couplers and deep etched AWG's, key components in Photonic Integrated Circuits, can be made much smaller than shallow etched ones. Deep etching seems to be the key to reduction of device dimensions and the question raises: where are the limits? This will be the subject of the present paper, and we changed the title accordingly. The dynamics of micro-electronic integration technology. The field of Information and Communication Technologies is showing a development speed which is unprecedented in history. Over a period of more than thirty years key features like processor speed and memory size are roughly doubling each 18 months, and experts believe that this development will continue in the coming decade. It is known as Moore's law and enabled by the developement of micro-electronic integration technology. Due to this development a steadily increasing performance of components and systems can be offered at an essentially constant price, a development that we recognise in the fact that the price of our new PC does not differ much from what we paid three years earlier for the previous one. This dynamics has become a major driver for the ICT market, which would collapse without this steady innovation. Moore's law in micro-photonics. If Photonics is going to play a substantial role in the ICT market it will have to
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    ABSTRACT: The integration scale in Photonic Inte- grated Circuits will be pushed to VLSI-level in the coming decade. This will bring major changes in both application and manufacturing. In this paper developments in Photonic Integration are reviewed and the limits for reduction of device dimensions are discussed
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