Mitsuharu Morisawa

National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

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Publications (65)10.79 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a humanoid robot HRP-2Kai, which is the improvement version of HRP-2 towards disaster response tasks. HRP-2 stands for a humanoid robotics platform-2, which was developed in phase two of the Japanese national project HRP (Humanoid Robotics Project, from 1998FY to 2002FY), while Kai means improvement in Japanese. In a year of the ninth year from releasing HRP-2, the Great East Japan Earthquake shook Japan on March 11, 2011. Since we reflected on that we were not able to deploy our robots for emergency response at that time, we started a study of the disaster response humanoid robots by improving HRP-2. Improvements are presented with its basic specification in this paper.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: This study describes our teleoperation interface, through which an operator can dictate various tasks to a biped humanoid robot. In this interface, the robot model and the environmental data are presented in three-dimensional computer graphics, and the robot actions are specified by several operational markers. The interface also provides a task sequencer function, enabling the operator to perform a task merely by proceeding a task sequence, which structures the procedure of a particular task. The task sequencer provides a much more efficient operation than the direct use of operational markers. We verified the interface by participation in the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) Finals. Our humanoid robot HRP-2kai operated through our teleoperation interface completed most of the DRC tasks.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the strategy used by the team AIST-NEDO at the DARPA Robotics Challenge to deal with the designated manipulation tasks by means of a task-level teleoperation of the HRP-2Kai humanoid robot, considering a disaster-hit scenario that is inherently non-structured and a limited communication between the user and the robot. The strategy, based on the information provided by a laser rangefinder and a set of cameras installed at the head and at both hands, consisted in the alignment of 3D models representing the desired manipulation targets with a measured point cloud, in order to provide a reference frame to describe the manipulation motion required for each task. Each motion was carefully planned in advance by assuming minimum information of the object representing the manipulation target. In order to exemplify the before mentioned approach, two representative tasks of the DARPA Robotics Challenge are described, as well as the corresponding results obtained during the competition.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We report the results obtained from our trials in making the HRP-2 humanoid robot climb vertical industrial-norm ladders. We integrated our multi-contact planner and multi-objective QP control as basic components. First, a set of contacts to climb the ladder is planned off-line and provided as an input for a finite state machine that sequences tasks to be realized by our multi-objective model-based QP in closed-loop control. The trials we made revealed that hardware changes are to be made on the HRP-2, and the software has to be made more robust. Yet, we confirmed that HRP-2 has power capability to climb real industrial ladders, such as those found in nuclear power plants and large scale manufacturings (e.g. airliners, shipyards and buildings).
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015
  • S. Nakaoka · M. Morisawa · K. Kaneko · S. Kajita · F. Kanehiro
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a user interface for teleoperating a biped humanoid robot and discusses the interface design. Teleoperation interfaces can be classified as either direct- or indirect-type, and the latter is employed by our interface because our goal is to use humanoid robots for disaster response, and the indirect-type interfaces have advantages for such applications. The basic design of our interface and concrete functions for operating the robot are described. The interface visualizes the last state of the robot and its environment, and the operation is performed by executing commands, including robot state acquisition, measurement, walking, reaching, and manipulation. Communication between the interface and the robot is requested only when a command is executed. The developed interface was tested with the HRP-2 robot and two example tasks, i.e., walking on uneven terrain and rotating a valve. We verified that the robot was able to complete the tasks by teleoperation using our interface.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015
  • M. Morisawa · N. Kita · S. Nakaoka · K. Kaneko · S. Kajita · F. Kanehiro
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a biped locomotion control method for an exploration in unknown environment. It is still hard for humanoid robot to walk autonomously even an artificial construction such as a power plant which are overly arranged many stairs and pipes. In such an environment, the physical constraints with a collision avoidance, joint limitations and support region on the terrain, become dominant limitations for an exploration. Updating environmental information to biped walking pattern generator and controller, a biped walking on a complicated rough terrain can be achieved. The proposed method is validated through several dynamics simulations with the HRP-2 humanoid robot.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The development of sensor system that is built into a hand of a humanoid robot toward environmental monitoring is presented in this paper. The developed system consists of a color C-MOS camera, a laser projector with a lens distributing a laser light, and a LED projector. The sensor system can activate/disable these components according to the purpose. This paper introduces the design process, pre-experimental results for evaluating components, and the specifications of the developed sensor system together with experimental results.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015
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    Nobuyuki Kita · Fumio Kanehiro · Mitsuharu Morisawa · Kenji Kaneko
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    ABSTRACT: Having a sense of its environment is essential for a bipedal robot to walk around autonomously in unknown and uneven indoor environments. In a previous study, we measured the floor height necessary for stable walk by processing images acquired by a fisheye stereo mounted on the chest of a bipedal robot. In order to avoid collisions between the bipedal robot and environmental obstacles, very wide field of sensing area is necessary because the bipedal robot can move sideways. In this study, we developed a method for checking the existence of an object on the barrier, which is the front half surface of a cylinder surrounding the body of the robot, by using the fisheye stereo images. By combining this with the occupancy grid method, we can detect an object that is likely to collide with the walking robot body even while walking sideways. The results of a real experiment conducted using the bipedal robot validate the proposed method.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Dec 2013
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    N.Kita · M. Morisawa · F. Kanehiro
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    ABSTRACT: A method that estimates a foot landing state at a designated landing place from a point cloud of an uneven surface or rough terrain is proposed. The method geometrically searches for the stable pose of the foot and outputs not only the position and orientation but also the shape of the support polygon of the stable foot. The experimental results using point clouds obtained by simulation and real sensing are evaluated. The proposed method can also perform an important role for uneven surface walking by using HRP-2 in a simulation.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Oct 2013
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    ABSTRACT: We discuss a feedback controller to stabilize biped walking which has toe support phase mimicking human gait. Using a reference walking pattern proposed in our previous work [11], our stabilizer can realize reliable walking. To evaluate the quality of stabilization, we propose two indicators, the maximum floor reaction force and the root mean square of the CoM tracking error. From our walking experiments, these indicators suggest us two policies of control parameter tuning, (1) not to control ZMP at toe support, and (2) not to use the ZMP phase-lead compensation for sagittal motion. These findings were validated by simulations of linear inverted pendulum model. It is shown that the observed behavior of the controller is caused by large velocity dissipation at support exchange.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2012
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    ABSTRACT: This paper tries to improve a balance control based on the Capture Point (CP) control. First the characteristics of the conventional balance controller are shown to be essentially the same as the CP controller. Then we analyze the transfer function of the balance controller. We introduce a new state variable with the CP integration to the CP and the ZMP (Zero-Moment Point) in order to trim a long term offset of the CP and the ZMP. Verification of the proposed balance controller is conducted through both simulation and experiments with a humanoid robot HRP-2[11].
    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2012
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an external force observer that estimates the external force acting on a biped humanoid robot, such as a collision force with a human or with an object. Since biped humanoid robots balance themselves on a limited area with foot soles, the detection of external force is important to realize for a stable balance controller for humanoid robots working in a real environment. In the proposed observer, the external force is estimated using inertial sensors and foot force sensors based on simple but efficient modeling of the forces applied to the robot. This paper also shows the experiments of the proposed external force observer using a real humanoid robot HRP-2. The experimental results show that the proposed observer has satisfactory performance to estimate the external force with sufficient response and accuracy.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2012
  • Mitsuharu Morisawa · Fumio Kanehiro · Kenji Kaneko · Shuuji Kajita · Kazuhito Yokoi
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a biped walking control method for a collision of a swinging foot on uneven terrain. Because a swing leg moves to a desired landing position, an unexpected collision on a terrain may be happened by a distance error between a foot and a terrain. A swing foot has to not only absorb a impact force, but also changes a trajectory as long as a swing foot contacts on a terrain. Furthermore it is required to keep a balance against a contact force. To prevent a trip over and a losing balance by contact on a terrain, two reactive key components are installed: 1) Set appropriate impedance gains of the feet according to a walking phase, 2) Update the desired landing position to the COG (Center of Gravity) pattern generation immediately as a detecting/releasing contact. In this paper, focused on a swing motion, a robust biped walking with a collision of a swinging foot on a uneven terrain is realized. The proposed method is validated through simulation results with the HRP-2 humanoid robot.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Oct 2011
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    Tokuo Tsuji · Kenji Kaneko · Kensuke Harada · Fumio Kanehiro · Mitsuharu Morisawa
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we develop a humanoid robot HRP-3χ where a multi-fingered hand is attached to the original HRP-3. By installing the visual recognition module for a single camera and the grasp planning module for the multi-fingered hand to the control software, HRP-3χ can recognize the position/orientation of the object and can calculate its grasping posture at online. Here, visual recognition module of a single camera is shown to be efficient. The effectiveness of the proposed HRP-3χ is confirmed by experimental result in which the robot achieves bipedal walk, visual recognition, and multiple finger grasp.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Oct 2011
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    ABSTRACT: A model of a walking pattern imitating human motion is presented. An accurate imitation of human motion and a robust bipedal walking motion are, however, hardly realized together. We therefore focus on only three characteristics of human walking motion: single toe support, knee stretching, and swing leg motion. Based on a conventional pattern generator, single toe support is added, waist height is changed in order to stretch the knees as much as possible, and swing leg motion is generated approximating the human's motion. The generated motion is then filtered to provide a feasible pattern. In addition, the stabilizer is improved in order to keep the Zero Moment Point (ZMP) within the tiny support polygon during the single support phase with toe link. Finally, we successfully demonstrate the generated walking pattern with the robot HRP-4C.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Sep 2011
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the development of humanoid robotics platform - 4 (or HRP-4 for short). The high-density implementation used for HRP-4C, the cybernetic human developed by AIST, is also applied to HRP-4. HRP-4 has a total of 34 degrees of freedom, including 7 degrees of freedom for each arm to facilitate object handling and has a slim, lightweight body with a height of 151 (cm) and weight 39 (kg). The software platform OpenRTM-aist and a Linux kernel with the RT-Preempt patch are used in the HRP-4 software system. Design concepts and mechanisms are presented with its basic specification in this paper.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Sep 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Hardware improvement of cybernetic human HRP-4C for entertainment is presented in this paper. We coined the word "Cybernetic Human" to explain a humanoid robot with a realistic head and a realistic figure of a human being. HRP-4C stands for Humanoid Robotics Platform-4 (Cybernetic human). Its joints and dimensions conform to average values of young Japanese females and HRP-4C looks very human-like. We have made HRP-4C present in several events to search for a possibility of use in the entertainment industry. Based on feedback from our experience, we improved its hardware. The new hand, the new foot with active toe joint, and the new eye with camera are introduced.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Sep 2011
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    ABSTRACT: A significant feature of humanoid robots is their potential to make various expressions as humans do, and this feature will allow the use of humanoid robots as assemblies of content technologies. Technical issues required for the practical use of humanoid robots are discussed in terms of robot hardware, motion expression generation, vocal expression generation and integrated GUI (Graphical User Interface), and the development of technologies to solve the issues and their integration have been carried out. As a result, we have produced HRP- 4C, a life-size biped humanoid robot with realistic human-like appearance, and Choreonoid, an integrated software interface that allows us to choreograph motions with robots as done with CG characters. Experiments on creating contents with these technologies verified the potential of humanoid robots as assemblies of content technologies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011
  • S. Nakaoka · K. Miura · M. Morisawa · F. Kanehiro · K. Kaneko · S. Kajita · K. Yokoi
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    ABSTRACT: A significant feature of humanoid robots is their potential to make various expressions as humans do, and this feature will allow the use of humanoid robots as assemblies of content technologies. Technical issues required for the practical use of humanoid robots are discussed in terms of robot hard ware, motion expression generation, vocal expression generation and integrated GUI (Graphical User Interface), and the development of technologies to solve the issues and their integration have been carried out. As a result, we have produced HRP-4C, a life-size biped humanoid robot with realistic human-like appearance, and Choreonoid, an integrated software interface that allows us to choreograph motions with robots as done with CG characters. Experiments on creating contents with these technologies verified the potential of humanoid robots as assemblies of content technologies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011
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    ABSTRACT: We have developed a humanoid robot (a cybernetic human called “HRP-4C”) which has the appearance and shape of a human being, can walk and move like one, and interacts with humans using speech recognition. Standing 158 cm tall and weighing 43 kg (including the battery), with the joints and dimensions set to average values for young Japanese females, HRP-4C looks very human-like. In this paper, we present ongoing challenges to create a new business in the contents industry with HRP-4C.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2010