Raffael Argiolu

Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands

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Publications (14)4.79 Total impact

  • Source
    Raffael Argiolu · Rob Van Der Heijden · Ilona Bos · Vincent Marchau
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, a model was developed describing effects of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) on location preferences of office-keeping organisations in urbanised. The model is based on a Hierarchical Information Integration Approach, using Stated Preference data. The model indicates that ITS significantly contribute to office location preferences. This article presents an analysis of the predictive validity of that model. Office keeping organisations in two medium-sized Dutch cities (Nijmegen and Arnhem) were asked to evaluate existing office locations assuming different ITS scenarios. The analyses show that the model systematically underestimates the attractiveness of office locations. However, the part worth utility scores, describing the contribution of ITS to location preferences, appeared to be good estimators of the added value of ITS. Moreover, the ranking position that responding organisations give to the office locations in their cities is estimated properly by the model.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research
  • Source
    Raffael Argiolu · Rob van der Heijden · Ilona Bos · Vincent Marchau
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the effect of three intelligent transport systems (ITS)-related transport concepts on location preferences of office-keeping organisations in urbanised areas. To measure these effects, a hierarchical information integration experiment was conducted in the Netherlands. Representatives of office-keeping organisations in selected city regions were questioned about the attractiveness of hypothetical ITS-based accessibility profiles of office locations. A general preference model was estimated to test the hypothesis that the introduction of ITS-based transport concepts will significantly influence the preferences of office-keeping organisations regarding office locations. It appears that all the included ITS attributes have a significant impact on the accessibility preferences of office-keeping organisations in urban regions. Moreover, location preferences change slightly after the introduction of the three ITS-related transport concepts.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2008 · Environment and Planning A
  • Source
    Raffael Argiolu · Rob van der Heijden · Vincent Marchau
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    ABSTRACT: Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) have undergone immense improvement, having been influenced by improved Information and Communication Technology (ICT) industries, automotive suppliers, and scientific institutes. ITS systems cover systems that support the driver in controlling his/her vehicle in a better way Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), and systems that support the traveler in finding an optimal mode and route. Less-tangible features of a transportation system are less easy to measure. The former mentioned ADAS systems and Full-automated driving are dependent upon a large variety of smaller technological developments, in particular sensors, navigation and detection systems. Currently, Fully Automated Driving is only applied successfully in small public transport concepts. Expected is that within 5 to 10 years, Fully Automated Driving will be possible for freight transport and larger public transport systems. The construction and validation of the scenarios result in narratives and/or images of different ITS implementations in an urban region.
    Full-text · Chapter · Dec 2007
  • Source
    Edwin Buitelaar · Rob Van der Heijden · Raffael Argiolu
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    ABSTRACT: Road congestion remains a serious problem, despite all the efforts to limit road use and to manage growing road traffic volumes. Economic approaches (such as pricing) are introduced based on traditional welfare economic theory. Although they are sometimes very successful, the magnitude of traffic issues also requires alternative and unconventional approaches. Perhaps a more innovative perspective is needed. The paper discusses an alternative economic approach starting from property rights theory. It is translated in transport systems in concepts of infrastructure capacity slot management, where slots are dynamically priced and exclusively allocated to individual users. Debates and practices regarding this approach in air traffic and rail traffic are further developed than in the field of road traffic. The paper aims to explore the potential benefits and disadvantages of the property rights approach for road traffic. Attention is paid to major institutional and technical conditions. The conclusion is that the approach theoretically has clear advantages and seems technologically feasible. Nevertheless, serious political and institutional issues have to be solved first.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2007 · Transport Reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) seem highly promising in reducing road congestion, traffic un-safety and environmental stress. However, up until now, real-world implementation of ADAS has been a slow process, as knowledge on future ADAS technologies, outcomes of ADAS implementation and conditions for ADAS implementation are uncertain. To reduce the uncertainty surrounding the implementation of ADAS, this paper presents the results of an expert opinion study on the Future of ADAS (FADAS). The results are compared to previously conducted expert opinion studies regarding the implementation of ADAS, showing that since the early eighties expert opinions roughly stayed the same.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2007
  • No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2006
  • Source
    Raffael Argiolu · D. M. Bos · V. A. W. J. Marchau
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    ABSTRACT: Authorities of urban areas are faced with growing traffic and environmental problems due to an ever-increasing use of cars within the urban area. The challenge is to limit and guide car use. The search for innovative strategies to cope with this challenge in the Netherlands focuses on the integration of three policy ingredients. These are: (a) influencing travel behaviour by offering seamless multi-mobility services, (b) the application of advanced information- and telecommunication technology and (c) the spatial concentration of new economic and residential developments along high quality public transport axes. This chapter discusses these ingredients separately and describes a project in the Dutch city of Eindhoven where these ingredients come together. The project, called 'Phileas' is a public transport service based on a fully new developed semi-automated bus on a network of dedicated lanes, offering a high level of information to the travellers and connecting new spatial developments by this public transport network.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2005
  • Source
    Rob van der Heijden · Raffael Argiolu · Ilona Bos · Vincent Marchau

    Full-text · Chapter · Jan 2005
  • Source
    Raffael Argiolu · Ilona Bos
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    ABSTRACT: The development of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) has taken a leap in the past decade. Under strong influence of improved Information and Communication Technology (ICT) industries, automotive suppliers and scientific institutes have put much effort on developing a range of ICT based applications for vehicles to drive safer, more comfortable, to make more efficient use of current and future infrastructure and to manage fleets more accurately. These improvements in transport services might improve the attractiveness of nearby locations. These locations (office, residential, leisure zones etcetera), might attract more activity as they appear to benefit from increased accessibility. Therefore, the expectation that ITS concepts will, in the long term, have significant spatial effect on the location pattern of, in particular, office keeping organisations, is plausible. This paper focuses on the impact of ITS concepts on location preferences of office keeping organisations. To measure this impact a stated preference experiment has been conducted in the Netherlands and involves office keeping organisations in selected city regions. The paper describes the first results of a model describing the attractiveness of location profiles, which are based on location preference attributes, and the role of ITS in these profiles. Three ITS concepts, which are selected and based on previous research are introduced as ‘new’ attributes within the location profiles. The estimated model was used to test two hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that the introduction of these ITS attributes will change the preferences of office keeping organisations regarding locations. The second hypothesis is that if preferences will change, the ITS attributes have a significant contribution to the preference model; at least for some categories of organisations. Further, the paper describes in what cases we should accept or reject these hypotheses. Finally, some conclusions are drawn on the role of
    Preview · Article · Jan 2005
  • R. Argiolu · V. A. W. J. Marchau

    No preview · Article · Jan 2004
  • R. Van Der Heijden · R. Argiolu · V. Marchau
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    ABSTRACT: R&D in Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) develops fast. Applications focus on all levels of the transport system: driver behaviour, infrastructure, traffic management and travel choices. Smart combinations of these applications in coherent ITS concepts will be the challenge for the future. Applied to urban systems, it is assumed that different ITS concepts will work out different with respect to urban patterns of economic activities. So far this possible impacts has hardly been a subject of research. This paper elaborates on the first step of a project that research on this relationship. In the paper attention is paid to the possible distinctions between ITS concepts. An illustration of such a concept, designed for public transport in a city in the Netherlands, is briefly described.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2004
  • Source
    Raffael Argiolu

    Preview · Article · Jan 2004
  • R. Argiolu · V. A. W. J. Marchau

    No preview · Article · Jan 2004
  • Source
    Rob Van Der Heijden · Raffael Argiolu · Ilona Bos · Vincent Marchau
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    ABSTRACT: The interest in Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) is growing. The relation between ITS and spatial development has not been widely studied yet. The possible impacts of three ITS-concepts on preferences for office locations were explored. Stated preference data were collected among managers of office-keeping businesses. Analyses indicate a significant contribution of the ITS concepts to the specified location preference model.
    Full-text · Article ·

Publication Stats

17 Citations
4.79 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004-2007
    • Radboud University Nijmegen
      • Nijmegen School of Management
      Nijmegen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands