Pierre Drion

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège, Luik, Wallonia, Belgium

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Publications (69)151.98 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To evaluate imaging changes occurring in a rat model of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), with emphasis on the intraluminal thrombus (ILT) occurrence. Methods: The post-induction growth of the AAA diameter was characterized using ultrasound in 22 rats. ILT was reported on 13 rats that underwent 14 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 2-18 days post-surgery, and on 10 rats that underwent 18 fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/microcomputed tomography examinations 2-27 days post-surgery. Logistic regressions were used to establish the evolution with time of AAA length, diameter, ILT thickness, volume, stratification, MRI and FDG PET signalling properties, and histological assessment of inflammatory infiltrates. Results: All of the following significantly increased with time post-induction (p < 0.001): AAA length, AAA diameter, ILT maximal thickness, ILT volume, ILT iron content and related MRI signalling changes, quantitative uptake on FDG PET, and the magnitude of inflammatory infiltrates on histology. However, the aneurysm growth peak followed occurrence of ILT approximately 6 days after elastase infusion. Conclusion: Our model emphasizes that occurrence of ILT precedes AAA peak growth. Aneurysm growth is associated with increasing levels of iron, signalling properties changes in both MRI and FDG PET, relating to its biological activities. Key points: • ILT occurrence in AAA is associated with increasing FDG uptake and growth. • MRI signalling changes in ILT reflect activities such as haemorrhage and RBC trapping. • Monitoring ILT activities using MRI may require no exogenous contrast agent.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · European Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is a leading malignancy affecting the female population worldwide. Most morbidity is caused by metastases that remain incurable to date. TGF-β1 has been identified as a key driving force behind metastatic breast cancer, with promising therapeutic implications. Employing immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis, we report, to our knowledge for the first time, that asporin is overexpressed in the stroma of most human breast cancers and is not expressed in normal breast tissue. In vitro, asporin is secreted by breast fibroblasts upon exposure to conditioned medium from some but not all human breast cancer cells. While hormone receptor (HR) positive cells cause strong asporin expression, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells suppress it. Further, our findings show that soluble IL-1β, secreted by TNBC cells, is responsible for inhibiting asporin in normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Using recombinant protein, as well as a synthetic peptide fragment, we demonstrate the ability of asporin to inhibit TGF-β1-mediated SMAD2 phosphorylation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and stemness in breast cancer cells. In two in vivo murine models of TNBC, we observed that tumors expressing asporin exhibit significantly reduced growth (2-fold; p = 0.01) and metastatic properties (3-fold; p = 0.045). A retrospective IHC study performed on human breast carcinoma (n = 180) demonstrates that asporin expression is lowest in TNBC and HER2+ tumors, while HR+ tumors have significantly higher asporin expression (4-fold; p = 0.001). Assessment of asporin expression and patient outcome (n = 60; 10-y follow-up) shows that low protein levels in the primary breast lesion significantly delineate patients with bad outcome regardless of the tumor HR status (area under the curve = 0.87; 95% CI 0.78-0.96; p = 0.0001). Survival analysis, based on gene expression (n = 375; 25-y follow-up), confirmed that low asporin levels are associated with a reduced likelihood of survival (hazard ratio = 0.58; 95% CI 0.37-0.91; p = 0.017). Although these data highlight the potential of asporin to serve as a prognostic marker, confirmation of the clinical value would require a prospective study on a much larger patient cohort. Our data show that asporin is a stroma-derived inhibitor of TGF-β1 and a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. High asporin expression is significantly associated with less aggressive tumors, stratifying patients according to the clinical outcome. Future pre-clinical studies should consider options for increasing asporin expression in TNBC as a promising strategy for targeted therapy.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · PLoS Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · International journal of cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: Les propriétés « réparatrices » des plaquettes, par la libération locale de facteurs de croissance, sont employées dans divers domaines médicaux. Cet article passe en revue les études fondamentales et cliniques relatives au plasma riche en plaquettes (PRP) appliqué aux lésions tendineuses.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal de Réadaptation Médicale Pratique et Formation en Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A limitation of current antiplatelet therapies is their inability to separate thrombotic events from bleeding occurrences. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to platelet activation is important for the development of improved therapies. Recently, protein tyrosine phosphatases have emerged as critical regulators of platelet function. METHODS AND RESULTS: This is the first report implicating the dual-specificity phosphatase 3 (DUSP3) in platelet signaling and thrombosis. This phosphatase is highly expressed in human and mouse platelets. Platelets from DUSP3-deficient mice displayed a selective impairment of aggregation and granule secretion mediated by the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI and the C-type lectin-like receptor 2. DUSP3-deficient mice were more resistant to collagen- and epinephrine-induced thromboembolism compared with wild-type mice and showed severely impaired thrombus formation on ferric chloride-induced carotid artery injury. Intriguingly, bleeding times were not altered in DUSP3-deficient mice. At the molecular level, DUSP3 deficiency impaired Syk tyrosine phosphorylation, subsequently reducing phosphorylation of phospholipase Cγ2 and calcium fluxes. To investigate DUSP3 function in human platelets, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of DUSP3 was developed. This compound specifically inhibited collagen- and C-type lectin-like receptor 2-induced human platelet aggregation, thereby phenocopying the effect of DUSP3 deficiency in murine cells. CONCLUSIONS: DUSP3 plays a selective and essential role in collagen- and C-type lectin-like receptor 2-mediated platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo. Inhibition of DUSP3 may prove therapeutic for arterial thrombosis. This is the first time a protein tyrosine phosphatase, implicated in platelet signaling, has been targeted with a small-molecule drug.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Circulation
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    ABSTRACT: Local treatment using drug loaded implants allows decreasing seric concentrations of the active ingredient with the purpose of limiting side effects and reaching perfect observance. Nowadays, some diseases are already treated with implants, but generally, by subcutaneous or intra vaginal implantation. In this work, a new implant device dedicated to the intra-peritoneal cavity was developed. For this purpose, a core-membrane polymer implant was selected. We propose an original method to determine the most appropriate membrane to control the release based on the use of Franz cells. The ability of the implant to release a constant quantity of an active ingredient will be assessed by testing implants in vitro. Finally, intra peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous in vivo implantation has been achieved in order to confirm the controlled and local release of the active ingredient.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant plasma cell disorder with poor long-term survival and high recurrence rates. Despite evidence of graft-versus-myeloma (GvM) effects, the use of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains controversial in MM. In the current study, we investigated the anti-myeloma effects of allo-SCT from B10.D2 mice into MHC-matched myeloma-bearing Balb/cJ mice, with concomitant development of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Balb/cJ mice were injected intravenously with luciferase-transfected MOPC315.BM cells, and received an allogeneic (B10.D2 donor) or autologous (Balb/cJ donor) transplant 30 days later. We observed a GvM effect in 94% of the allogeneic transplanted mice, as the luciferase signal completely disappeared after transplantation, whereas all the autologous transplanted mice showed myeloma progression. Lower serum paraprotein levels and lower myeloma infiltration in bone marrow and spleen in the allogeneic setting confirmed the observed GvM effect. In addition, the treated mice also displayed chronic GvHD symptoms. In vivo and in vitro data suggested the involvement of effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells associated with the GvM response. The essential role of CD8 T cells was demonstrated in vivo where CD8 T-cell depletion of the graft resulted in reduced GvM effects. Finally, TCR Vβ spectratyping analysis identified Vβ families within CD4 and CD8 T cells, which were associated with both GvM effects and GvHD, whereas other Vβ families within CD4 T cells were associated exclusively with either GvM or GvHD responses. We successfully established an immunocompetent murine model of graft-versus-myeloma. This is the first murine GvM model using immunocompetent mice that develop MM which closely resembles human MM disease and that are treated after disease establishment with an allo-SCT. Importantly, using TCR Vβ spectratyping, we also demonstrated the presence of GvM unique responses potentially associated with the curative capacity of this immunotherapeutic approach.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex multifactorial disease with genetic and environmental components. AAA is more common in males, whereas women have a greater risk of rupture and more frequently have concomitant thoracic aortic aneurysms. Moreover, women are diagnosed with AAA about 10 years later and seem to be protected by female sex hormones. In this MEDLINE-based review of literature we examined human and animal, in vivo and in vitro studies, to further deepen our understanding of the sexual dimorphism of AAA. We focus on the role of sex hormones during the formation and growth of AAA. Endogenous estrogens and exogenous 17β-estradiol were found to exert favorable actions protecting from AAA in animal models, whereas exogenous hormone replacement therapy in humans had inconclusive results. Androgens, known to have detrimental effects in the vasculature, in sufficient levels maintain the integrity of the aortic wall through their anabolic actions and act differentially in males and females, whereas lower levels of testosterone have been associated with AAA in humans. In conclusion, sex differences remain an important area of AAA research, but further studies especially in humans are needed. Furthermore, differential molecular mechanisms of sex hormones constitute a potential therapeutic target for AAA.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Annals of Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Tendon lesions are among the most frequent musculoskeletal pathologies. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is known to regulate angiogenesis. VEGF-111, a biologically active and proteolysis-resistant splice variant of this family, was recently identified. This study aimed at evaluating whether VEGF-111 could have a therapeutic interest in tendon pathologies. Surgical section of one Achilles tendon of rats was performed before a local injection of either saline or VEGF-111. After 5, 15 and 30 days, the Achilles tendons of 10 rats of both groups were sampled and submitted to a biomechanical tensile test. The force necessary to induce tendon rupture was greater for tendons of the VEGF-111 group (p<0.05) while the section areas of the tendons were similar. The mechanical stress was similar at 5 and 15 days in the both groups but was improved for the VEGF-111 group at day 30 (p <0.001). No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of collagen III, tenomodulin and MMP-9. In conclusion, we observed that a local injection of VEGF-111 improves the early phases of the healing process of rat tendons after a surgical section. Further confirmatory experimentations are needed to consolidate our results.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014
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    ABSTRACT: BackgroundDUSP3 phosphatase, also known as V accinia-H1 Related (VHR) phosphatase, encoded by DUSP3/Dusp3 gene, is a relatively small member of the dual-specificity protein phosphatases. In vitro studies showed that DUSP3 is a negative regulator of ERK and JNK pathways in several cell lines. On the other hand, DUSP3 is implicated in human cancer. It has been alternatively described as having tumor suppressive and oncogenic properties. Thus, the available data suggest that DUSP3 plays complex and contradictory roles in tumorigenesis that could be cell type-dependent. Since most of these studies were performed using recombinant proteins or in cell-transfection based assays, the physiological function of DUSP3 has remained elusive.ResultsUsing immunohistochemistry on human cervical sections, we observed a strong expression of DUSP3 in endothelial cells (EC) suggesting a contribution for this phosphatase to EC functions. DUSP3 downregulation, using RNA interference, in human EC reduced significantly in vitro tube formation on Matrigel and spheroid angiogenic sprouting. However, this defect was not associated with an altered phosphorylation of the documented in vitro DUSP3 substrates, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and EGFR but was associated with an increased PKC phosphorylation. To investigate the physiological function of DUSP3, we generated Dusp3-deficient mice by homologous recombination. The obtained DUSP3−/− mice were healthy, fertile, with no spontaneous phenotype and no vascular defect. However, DUSP3 deficiency prevented neo-vascularization of transplanted b-FGF containing Matrigel and LLC xenograft tumors as evidenced by hemoglobin (Hb) and FITC-dextran quantifications. Furthermore, we found that DUSP3 is required for b-FGF-induced microvessel outgrowth in the aortic ring assay.ConclusionsAll together, our data identify DUSP3 as a new important player in angiogenesis.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · Molecular Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To assess the potential protective effects of three polyphenols oleuropein, rutin and curcumin, on joint ageing and osteoarthritis development. Design Sixty 4-week-old Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were randomized into four groups and received daily during 31 weeks either standard guinea pig diet (control group) or a standard guinea pig diet enriched with oleuropein (0.025 %), rutin (0.5%) or rutin/curcumin (0.5%/0.25%) association. Biomarkers of osteoarthritis (Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2, Fib3-1, Fib3-2, ARGS), as well as inflammation (PGE2) were quantified in the serum. Histological assessments of knee cartilage and synovial membrane were performed at week 4 (5 young reference guinea pigs) and week 35. Results At week 35, guinea pigs in the control group spontaneously developed significant cartilage lesions with mild synovial inflammation. The histological scores of cartilage lesions and synovitis were well correlated with the increased level of serum biomarkers. Histologically, all treatments significantly reduced the cartilage degradation score (p<0.01), but only oleuropein significantly decreased the synovial histological score (p<0.05) and serum PGE2 levels (p<0.01) compared to the control group. Coll2-1 was decreased by rutin and the combination of rutin/curcumin, Fib3-1 and Fib3-2 were only decreased by the rutin/curcumin mixture, while Coll2-1NO2 was significantly decreased by all treatments (p<0.05). Conclusion Oleuropein and rutin +/- curcumin significantly slowed down the progression of spontaneous OA lesions in guinea pigs. While no additive effect was seen in the curcumin+rutin group, the differential effects of oleuropein and rutin on inflammatory and cartilage catabolic markers suggest an interesting combination for future studies in OA protection.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
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    ABSTRACT: Even if eccentric exercises appear favourable in primary prevention of tendons lesions and, especially, in secondary prevention after tendinopathy, the biomechanical changes to the tissue are not yet clear. We aimed to better define the biomechanical changes that affect healthy tendon after eccentric and concentric training. Randomised controlled trial. Animal study. 18 Sprague-Dawley rats of 2 months. The 6 rats in the control group (U) were not subjected to physical exercise. The 12 remaining rats (6 in each group) ran on a treadmill set at a +15° incline for concentric training (C) or a -15° incline for eccentric training (E), at a speed of 17 m/min for 1 h, three times per week for 5 weeks. The tricipital, patellar and Achilles tendons were subsequently removed to perform a traction test until rupture, and a histological analysis was performed. There was a significant improvement in the rupture force of the patellar and tricipital tendons between the U and E groups. The tricipital tendons in the control group presented a significantly smaller cross-section than the E- and C-trained groups, but none between E and C groups. No significant difference was observed for the mechanical stress at rupture per surface unit between the three groups for all three tendons. However, a tendency towards improvement these values was observed between the trained and the U groups for the patellar tendon. Histological studies demonstrated the tendency of the development of a greater number of blood vessels and a larger quantity of collagen in the eccentric group. The mechanical properties of tendons in rats improve after specific training, especially following eccentric training. Our results partly explained how mechanical loading, especially in eccentric mode, could improve the tendon structure and perhaps prevent to tendon pathologies.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · British Journal of Sports Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Platelets contain growth factors released during their degranulation following activation. These growth factors promote tissue remodeling, wound healing and angiogenesis. Currently, the clinical effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) is still discussed, or even controversial. Our researches have assessed the effectiveness of PRP on the healing of animal tendons and human beings suffering from chronic jumper's knee.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Revue médicale de Liège
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    ABSTRACT: The positive effect of leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) on osteogenesis has been widely described in vitro. However, clinical and preclinical studies are very little and controversial in demonstrating a significant beneficial effect of L-PRF in bone regeneration. The goal of the present study was to compare the potential effect of L-PRF in a standardized model. A total of 72 hemispheres were implanted on the calvaria of 18 rabbits and filled with three different space fillers: L-PRF, bovine hydroxyapatite (BHA), BHA + L-PRF, and an empty hemisphere was used as control. Six rabbits were sacrificed at three distinct time points: 1 week, 5 weeks, and 12 weeks. Histological and histomorphometrical analyses were carried out. At the early phase of bone regeneration (1 week), from a descriptive analysis, a higher proportion of connective tissue colonized the regeneration chamber in the two groups containing BHA particles. Nevertheless, no statistical differences were found within the four groups in terms of bone quantity and quality at each timepoint (p = .3623). According to the present study, L-PRF does not seem to provide any additional effect on the kinetics, quality, and quantity of bone in the present model of guided bone regeneration.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2013 · Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Background: No systemic preventive therapy has been successful in inhibiting the development of postoperative peritoneal adhesions (PPAs). Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of 5 day administration of parecoxib, on PPA prevention and on suture or wound healing in rats. Methods: In a model of PPAs induced by peritoneal electrical burn, 30 rats were randomized into 3 groups according to parecoxib administration route (control; intraperitoneal (IP); intramuscular (IM)). Plasma and peritoneal levels of PAI-1 and tPA were measured at T0, after 90 min of surgery (T90), and on postoperative day 10 (D10). In a cecum resection model, 20 rats were randomized into two groups (control and IP parecoxib), and abdominal wound healing and suture leakage were assessed at D10. In both models, PPAs were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively on D10. Results: Administration of parecoxib significantly decreased the quantity (p < .05) and the severity (p < .01) of PPAs in both models. In addition, parecoxib administration did not cause healing defects or infectious complications in the two models. In the peritoneal burn model, IP or IM parecoxib administration inhibited the increase of postoperative plasma and peritoneum PAI-1 levels, an increase that was observed in the control group (p < .01). No anastomosis leakage could be demonstrated in both groups in the cecum resection model. Conclusion: This study showed that, in these rat models, parecoxib might reduce PPA formation. Confirmation of the safety of parecoxib on intestinal anastomoses is required and should be investigated in further animal models.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · Journal of Investigative Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia
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    ABSTRACT: Background: We investigated the ability of clinical-grade enriched human regulatory T cells (Treg) to attenuate experimental xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) induced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs; autologous to Treg) infusion in NSG mice, as well as verified their inability to induce xenogeneic GVHD when infused alone. Study design and methods: Human Treg were isolated from peripheral blood apheresis products with a cell separation system (CliniMACS, Miltenyi Biotec GmbH) using a two-step procedure (simultaneous CD8 and CD19 depletion followed by CD25-positive selection) in six independent experiments with six different healthy volunteer donors. Sublethally (2.5 Gy) irradiated NSG mice were given 2 × 10(6) cytapheresis (PBMNC) product cells intravenously (IV) without (PBMNC group) or with 1 × 10(6) Treg (PBMNC + Treg group), while other NSG mice received 2 × 10(6) enriched Treg alone (also in IV; Treg group). Results: The first five procedures were successful at obtaining a relatively pure Treg population (defined as >50%), while the sixth procedure, due to a technical problem, was not (Treg purity, 42%). Treg cotransfusion significantly delayed death from xenogeneic GVHD in the first five experiments, (p < 0.0001) but not in the sixth experiment. Importantly, none of the mice given enriched Treg alone (Treg group) experienced clinical signs of GVHD, while, interestingly, the CD4+ cells found in these mice 26 days after transplantation were mainly conventional T cells (median CD25+FoxP3+ cells among human CD4+ total cells were only 2.1, 3.1, and 12.2% in spleen, marrow, and blood, respectively). Conclusions: Infusion of clinical-grade enriched Treg delayed the occurrence of xenogeneic GVHD without inducing toxicity in this murine model.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · Transfusion
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    ABSTRACT: Transmission is a matter of life or death for pathogen lineages and can therefore be considered as the main motor of their evolution. Gammaherpesviruses are archetypal pathogenic persistent viruses which have evolved to be transmitted in presence of specific immune response. Identifying their mode of transmission and their mechanisms of immune evasion is therefore essential to develop prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against these infections. As the known human gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus are host-specific and lack a convenient in vivo infection model; related animal gammaherpesviruses, such as murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68), are commonly used as general models of gammaherpesvirus infections in vivo. To date, it has however never been possible to monitor viral excretion or virus transmission of MHV-68 in laboratory mice population. In this study, we have used MHV-68 associated with global luciferase imaging to investigate potential excretion sites of this virus in laboratory mice. This allowed us to identify a genital excretion site of MHV-68 following intranasal infection and latency establishment in female mice. This excretion occurred at the external border of the vagina and was dependent on the presence of estrogens. However, MHV-68 vaginal excretion was not associated with vertical transmission to the litter or with horizontal transmission to female mice. In contrast, we observed efficient virus transmission to naïve males after sexual contact. In vivo imaging allowed us to show that MHV-68 firstly replicated in penis epithelium and corpus cavernosum before spreading to draining lymph nodes and spleen. All together, those results revealed the first experimental transmission model for MHV-68 in laboratory mice. In the future, this model could help us to better understand the biology of gammaherpesviruses and could also allow the development of strategies that could prevent the spread of these viruses in natural populations.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2013 · PLoS Pathogens
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    ABSTRACT: The treatment of choice for tendinopathies is eccentric reeducation. Although the clinical results appear favorable, the biomechanical changes to the tissue are not yet clear. Even if the mechanotransduction theory is commonly accepted, the physiology of tendons is not clearly understood. We aimed to better define the biomechanical and histological changes that affect healthy tendon after eccentric and concentric training. This study compared the effects of two methods of training (eccentric [E] training and concentric [C] training) with untrained (U) rats. The animals were trained over a period of 5 weeks. The tricipital, patellar, and Achilles tendons were removed, measured and a tensile test until failure was performed. A histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stains) was also realized. There was a significant increase in the rupture force of the patellar and tricipital tendons between the U and E groups. The tricipital tendons in the control group presented a significantly smaller cross-sectional area than the E- and C-trained groups, but none was constated between E and C groups. No significant difference was observed for the mechanical stress between the three groups for all three tendons. Histological studies demonstrated the development of a greater number of blood vessels and a larger quantity of collagen in the E group. The mechanical properties of tendons in rats improve after specific training, especially following eccentric training. Our results partly explained how mechanical loading, especially in eccentric mode, could improve the healing of tendon. © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Orthopaedic Research

Publication Stats

517 Citations
151.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège
      Luik, Wallonia, Belgium
  • 1998-2015
    • University of Liège
      • • Laboratory of Connective Tissues Biology
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Department of Infectious and Parasite Diseases
      • • Hemodynamics Research Laboratory (HemoLiege)
      • • Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
      Luik, Walloon, Belgium
  • 2003
    • Marien Ngouabi University
      N'Tamo, Brazzaville, Republic of the Congo