R. S. Arias

Intelligent Hearing Systems, Miami, FL USA, Miami, Florida, United States

Are you R. S. Arias?

Claim your profile

Publications (36)62.68 Total impact

  • Source
    Renée S. Arias · Phat M. Dang · Victor S. Sobolev
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 25% of the food crops in the world are contaminated with aflatoxins. That represents 100 million tons of food being destroyed or diverted to non-human consumption each year. Aflatoxins are powerful carcinogens normally accumulated by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in cereals, nuts, root crops and other agricultural products. Silencing of five aflatoxin-synthesis genes by RNA interference (RNAi) in peanut plants was used to control aflatoxin accumulation following inoculation with A. flavus. Previously, no method existed to analyze the effectiveness of RNAi in individual peanut transgenic events, as these usually produce few seeds, and traditional methods of large field experiments under aflatoxin-conducive conditions were not an option. In the field, the probability of finding naturally contaminated seeds is often 1/100 to 1/1,000. In addition, aflatoxin contamination is not uniformly distributed. Our method uses few seeds per transgenic event, with small pieces processed for real-time PCR (RT-PCR) or small RNA sequencing, and for analysis of aflatoxin accumulation by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). RNAi-expressing peanut lines 288-72 and 288-74, showed up to 100% reduction (p≤0.01) in aflatoxin B1 and B2 compared to the control that accumulated up to 14,000 ng(.)g(-1) of aflatoxin B1 when inoculated with aflatoxigenic A. flavus. As reference, the maximum total of aflatoxins allowable for human consumption in the United States is 20 ng(.)g(-1). This protocol describes the application of RNAi-mediated control of aflatoxins in transgenic peanut seeds and methods for its evaluation. We believe that its application in breeding of peanut and other crops will bring rapid advancement in this important area of science, medicine and human nutrition, and will significantly contribute to the international effort to control aflatoxins, and potentially other mycotoxins in major food crops.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Visualized Experiments
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cercospora arachidicola , causal agent of early leaf spot, is an economically important peanut pathogen. Lack of genetic information about this fungus prevents understanding the role that potentially diverse genotypes may have in peanut breeding programs. Here, we report for the first time a draft genome sequence of C. arachidicola .
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Genome Announcements
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Concerns exist that Bt-resistant populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) found in Puerto Rico, could spread to continental United States, and about the lack of molecular tools to monitor potential crosses or distinguish populations. In this work, the feasibility of genotyping S. frugiperda crosses between Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) (Bt) resistant and susceptible populations using simple sequence repeats (SSRs, or microsatellites) was assessed. Parents and their corresponding progeny (five resistant, five susceptible phenotype) were genotyped using 192 SSRs on three reciprocate crosses alternating male and female from Bt-susceptible and Bt-resistant populations. Oviposition, mortality and fecundity were evaluated for five pairs of each of the crosses. Cluster analysis showed that progeny of each cross was associated with the paternal and not the maternal genotype, probably due to higher heterozygosity in male parents compared to females. Seven SSR markers had one or more alleles correlated (p≤0.002) with the Bt-resistant phenotype, and 18 SSRs showed uniparental inheritance. Analysis of additional samples showed genetic differences among isofamilies of S. frugiperda at 65 loci. The best 35 markers that discriminated isofamilies are reported, three of them related to components of the communication system in moths: pheromone, olfactory receptor and antennal esterase. This is the first report of: 1) a multi-locus genotyping in crosses of Bt-resistant and susceptible individuals of S. frugiperda, 2) seven codominant markers associated to Bt-resistance in this species, 3) discrimination of isofamilies by genetic differences at three loci that could affect the behavior of S. frugiperda.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pouteria sapota is known for its edible fruits that contain unique carotenoids, as well as for its fungitoxic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity. However, its genetics is mostly unknown, including aspects about its genetic diversity and domestication process. We did high-throughput sequencing of microsatellite-enriched libraries of P. sapota, generated 5223 contig DNA sequences, 1.8 Mbp, developed 368 microsatellites markers and tested them on 29 individuals from 10 populations (seven wild, three cultivated) from Mexico, its putative domestication center. Gene ontology BLAST analysis of the DNA sequences containing microsatellites showed potential association to physiological functions. Genetic diversity was slightly higher in cultivated than in the wild gene pool (HE = 0.41 and HE = 0.35, respectively), although modified Garza–Williamson Index and Bottleneck software showed evidence for a reduction in genetic diversity for the cultivated one. Neighbor Joining, 3D Principal Coordinates Analysis and assignment tests grouped most individuals according to their geographic origin but no clear separation was observed between wild or cultivated gene pools due to, perhaps, the existence of several admixed populations. The developed microsatellites have a great potential in genetic population and domestication studies of P. sapota but additional sampling will be necessary to better understand how the domestication process has impacted the genetic diversity of this fruit crop.
    Preview · Article · May 2015
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aspergillus flavus accumulates carcinogenic aflatoxins in peanuts, mainly in immature kernels during drought. Aspergillus flavus invasion induces accumulation of phytoalexins, mostly stilbenoids in peanut, as a plant defence mechanism. Because fungal laccases are often related to pathogenicity and can degrade stilbenoids, this study reports for the first time the expression of A. flavus laccases in the presence of kernels, hulls and low water potential in relation to the accumulation of phytoalexins in peanut kernels. Packed-cell volume (PCV) of A. flavus biomass was significantly higher (P ≤ 0·01) in the presence of mature kernels, dead kernels, and mature and immature peanut hulls than the control. The presence of kernels and hulls lowered the level of expression of three A. flavus laccases by 4–6-fold (P < 0·01), whereas 3% sucrose up-regulated them by 35–304-fold, and low water potential (−1·1 MPa) up-regulated them by 85–248-fold (P < 0·01). Phytoalexins that accumulated in peanut kernels in the presence of A. flavus and were quantified by HPLC-DAD-MS were primarily the stilbenoids: 3′-isopentadienyl-3,5,4′-trihydroxystilbene (IPD), chiricanine-A, arachidin-2, arachidin-3 and arahypin-1. Apparent degradation of phytoalexins was observed when using a priori induction of phytoalexins in seeds in combination with a priori induction of laccases in A. flavus. The up-regulation of laccase expression observed at −1·1 MPa and at high sucrose concentration could be contributing to peanut invasion in immature kernels under drought conditions.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · Plant Pathology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The feasibility of genotyping Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) crosses between Bt resistant and susceptible populations using SSRs was assessed. Parents and their corresponding progeny (five resistant, five susceptible phenotype) were genotyped using 192 SSRs on three reciprocate crosses of Bt-susceptible and Bt-resistant populations. Oviposition, mortality and fecundity were evaluated for five pairs of each of the crosses. Cluster analysis, heterozygosity and phenotype marker association were analyzed. Also a multi-allele discrimination of isofamilies by markers associated to insect behavior is reported.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The increasing use of secondary water sources for irrigation, which is highly linked to salinization, creates a demand for salt tolerant turf. Seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) is a warm-season turfgrass that survives in sand dunes along coastal sites, brackish ponds, and in estuaries. Some seashore paspalum accessions and cultivars are far more salt tolerant than others. To identify genetic regions that are associated with salt tolerance, molecular tools must be developed. In this study, genomic libraries, enriched for microsatellites, were generated using the salt tolerant accession HI33. High throughput sequencing and subsequent assembling of these libraries resulted in 18,967 contigs and 158,595 singletons. The number of simple sequence repeats (SSR) detected in contigs and in singletons was 3511 and 31,949, respectively, and the number of primer sets designed within each group was 937 and 1667. A total of 80 SSR markers, including five markers previously developed, were used to assess genetic relationships among 18 Paspalum accessions. Two major clusters were identified from the seashore paspalum accessions. Accessions that are likely polyploids, all with coarse leaves, grouped together whereas accessions with fine-to mid-fine leaves formed a second group. Furthermore, 33 seashore paspalum SSR markers cross-amplified in bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) and these markers can be a useful tool in this species.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Crop Science
  • V. S. Sobolev · V. A. Orner · R. S. Arias
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background and Aims The role and linkage of endophytic bacteria to resistance of peanut seeds to biotic stress is poorly understood. The aims of the present study were to survey the experimental (axenic) and control (conventional) peanut plants for the predominant endophytic bacteria, and to characterize isolates with activity against selected A. flavus strains. Methods Young axenic plants were grown from presumably bacteria-free embryos in the lab, and then they were grown in a field. Endophytic bacterial species were identified by the analysis of DNA sequences of their 16S-ribosomal RNA gene. DNA extracted from soil was also analyzed for predominant bacteria. Results Mature seeds from the experimental and control plants contained several species of nonpathogenic endophytic bacteria. Among the eight bacterial species isolated from seeds, and DNA sequences detected in soil, Bacillus thuringiensis was dominant. All B. amyloliquefaciens isolates, the second abundant species in seeds demonstrated activity against A. flavus. This effect was not observed with any other bacterial isolates. There was no significant difference in number and relative occurrence of the two major bacterial species between the experimental and conventionally grown control seeds. Conclusion Endophytic bacterial colonization derives from local soil and not from the seed source, and the peanut plant accommodates only selected species of bacteria from diverse soil populations. Some bacterial isolates showed antibiosis against A. flavus.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · Plant and Soil
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The increasing use of secondary water sources for irrigation, which is highly linked to salinization, creates a demand for salt tolerant turf. Seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) is a warm-season turfgrass that survives in sand dunes along coastal sites, brackish ponds, and in estuaries. Some seashore paspalum accessions and cultivars are far more salt tolerant than others. To identify genetic regions that are associated with salt tolerance, molecular tools must be developed. In this study, genomic libraries, enriched for microsatellites, were generated using the salt tolerant accession HI33. High throughput sequencing and subsequent assembling of these libraries resulted in 18,967 contigs and 158,595 singletons. The number of simple sequence repeats (SSR) detected in contigs and in singletons was 3511 and 31,949, respectively, and the number of primer sets designed within each group was 937 and 1667. A total of 80 SSR markers, including five markers previously developed, were used to assess genetic relationships among 18 Paspalum accessions. Two major clusters were identified from the seashore paspalum accessions. Accessions that are likely polyploids, all with coarse leaves, grouped together whereas accessions with fine-to mid-fine leaves formed a second group. Furthermore, 33 seashore paspalum SSR markers cross-amplified in bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) and these markers can be a useful tool in this species.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Plant Health Progress
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The genetic improvement of tropical fruit trees is limited when compared to progress achieved in temperate fruit trees and annual crops. Tropical fruit tree breeding programs require significant resources to develop new cultivars that are adapted to modern shipping and storage requirements. The use of molecular markers in tropical fruit tree breeding is greatly assisting in solving a number of difficult challenges for breeders such as the development of complex family structures for recombination mapping and for recurrent selection. A review of the literature on molecular markers development and new techniques for increasing single-nucleotide polymorphic markers is discussed. The development of marker-assisted breeding for these tropical crops is also discussed.
    No preview · Chapter · Nov 2012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The genetic improvement of tropical fruit trees is limited when compared to progress achieved in temperate fruit trees and annual crops. Tropical fruit tree breeding programs require significant resources to develop new cultivars that are adapted to modern shipping and storage requirements. The use of molecular markers in tropical fruit tree breeding is greatly assisting in solving a number of difficult challenges for breeders such as the development of complex family structures for recombination mapping and for recurrent selection. A review of the literature on molecular markers development and new techniques for increasing single-nucleotide polymorphic markers is discussed. The development of marker-assisted breeding for these tropical tree crops is also discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012
  • Source
    R S ARIAS · W T MOLIN · J D RAY · M D PEEL · B E SCHEFFLER
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Arias RS, Molin WT, Ray JD, Peel MD & Scheffler BE (2011). Isolation and characterisation of the first microsatellite markers for Cyperus rotundus. Weed Research51, 451–460.SummaryThis is the first report of microsatellite markers for Cyperus rotundus. A total of 191 sequence-specific microsatellite markers were isolated and used to screen 12 accessions of C. rotundus and one accession of Cyperus esculentus collected from 10 different countries. Polymorphisms were observed in 49% of the markers tested, 22% of the markers were monomorphic and 29% had weak or no amplification. The best 57 markers are reported, and cluster analysis was used to analyse their resolving power. BLASTx screening of the contig sequences was also performed. Multiallelic loci over all samples ranged from 24% to 60%. The maximum number of alleles detected by the markers suggests a polyploidy nature of all C. rotundus accessions tested, except for the sample N25-Brazil. Chromosome number was determined for N12-Taiwan and used as an internal flow cytometry standard to estimate the amount of DNA within haploid nuclei of the remaining material. Chromosome numbers estimated for C. rotundus were 16 and 24. The markers identified in this study can be used for the identification of biotypes and detection of potential crosses of C. rotundus, to implement management practices for the effective control of this weed.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2011 · Weed Research
  • Source
    R. S. Arias · J. D. Ray · A. Mengistu · B. E. Scheffler
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: One hundred and eighty-two microsatellites or simple-sequence-repeat (SSR) markers for Macrophomina phaseolina were developed. These were tested on 24 isolates of M. phaseolina obtained from seven plant species, and the genetic variation of isolates was studied in relation to potential biological processes that could be affected in this fungus. A total of 120 SSR markers were polymorphic, amplifying >90% of the 24 isolates tested. Thirty percent of the markers showed multiple alleles on individual samples. A large number of markers showed unique alleles in isolates collected from pumpkin and snap bean. DNA sequences corresponding to 43 markers had significant hits on blastx and/or blast2go, and the polymorphism of 36 of those markers showed specific allele patterns for one or more plant host origin of the isolates. Additional tests on growth rate and copper resistance of the isolates identified markers that could be related to those traits. In addition, 27 markers were monomorphic and amplified all 24 isolates. Whereas polymorphic markers can be used for population genetics studies of M. phaseolina, the group of 27 monomorphic markers could help in the fast identification of this species in clinical specimens. The SSR markers developed here will enrich the limited molecular marker resource in M. phaseolina and could be used as the basis for more in-depth studies of the host-pathogen interactions of M. phaseolina.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2011 · Plant Pathology
  • Source
    Renée S. Arias
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Esta es la primera publicación de microsatelites de Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), una plaga importante del continente Americano. Hemos aislado 192 marcadores de microsatelites usando un pyrosequenciador, y analizamos 15 individuos de eight isofamilias colectadas de tres áreas geográficas, Puerto Rico (PR), Texas (TX) y Mississippi (MS), incluyendo isofamilias resistentes y susceptibles a Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bacillales: Bacillaceae). Análisis de cluster SE realizó con el propósito de determinar el potencial discriminatorio de los microsatélites. Este agrupo las isofamilias de TX distantes de las isofamilias de PR, mientras que las de MS SE agruparon con TX y con PR separadamente. La distancia genética dentro de isofamilias fue de 0.22 a 0.56, mientras que la distancia mínima entre isofamilias fue 0.83. Un total de 80 marcadores que tuvieron valores de UPIC ≥1 como potencial discriminante son presentados. Valores de UPIC permiten reducir costos y elegir marcadores que brindan la máxima variabilidad genética en estudios posteriores. Los marcadores listados pueden contribuir significativamente al n-mero de marcadores moleculares disponibles para S. frugiperda. De los mejores 125 markers, 103 presentaron un máximo de two alelos por muestra, lo que los hace buenos candidatos para estudios de genética poblacional. Resultados de BLAST indicarían potencial significado biológico del polimorfismo. El porcentaje de alelos compartidos por las tres regiones geográficas fue 14%. Además, estos marcadores podrían ser usados para monitorear migración de poblaciones, en el desarrollo de agentes de control biológico, en programas de mejoramiento, y para prácticas de manejo en general.
    Preview · Article · May 2011 · Annals of the Entomological Society of America
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is the first report of sequence-specific microsatellite markers (simple sequence repeats [SSRs]) of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an economically important pest of crops on the Americas.Weisolated 192 microsatellite markers by using pyrosequencing and screened 15 individuals from eight isofamilies collected from three geographical areas: Puerto Rico (PR), Texas (TX), and Mississippi (MS). Isofamilies resistant to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) also were included. Cluster analysis was performed to determine the potential use of these SSRs in discriminating populations, and colonies were grouped with a reliability of 100% estimated by bootstrap. In this analysis, colonies from TX grouped away from those from PR, but the two MS isofamilies grouped with TX and PR separately. Genetic distance within isofamilies ranged between 0.22 and 0.56, and the minimum distance between isofamilies was 0.83. Unique pattern informative combination (UPIC) scores were calculated, and the 80 SSR markers that had UPIC scores of≥1 are listed according to their discriminating potential. UPIC scores allow reducing costs by choosing fewer and highly informative markers for future studies. From the best 125 markers, 103 had a maximum of two alleles per sample, making them ideal candidates for population genetic studies. BLAST screening of the sequences points to potential biological meaning of marker polymorphisms. The percentage of alleles shared by the three geographic areas was 14%. The markers reported will signifcantly enrich the pool of molecular markers available for S. frugiperda. In addition, they could be used for monitoring migration of populations, in the development of biocontrol agents and for management practices in general.
    No preview · Article · May 2011
  • Source
    Renée S Arias · Salliana R Stetina · Brian E Scheffler
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Currently, a large number of microsatellites are available for Rotylenchulus reniformis (reniform nematode); however, two barriers exist for genotyping samples from different geographical areas. The limited amount of nucleic acids obtained from single nematodes which would require their multiplication to obtain enough DNA for testing; and the strictly regulated transport of live samples and multiplication in greenhouse for being a plant pathogen. Whole-genome amplification (WGA) of samples consisting of one and five dead gravid females with their associated egg masses was successfully performed on disrupted tissue using three commercial kits. DNA yield after WGA ranged from 0.5 to 8 mu g and was used to test 96 microsatellite markers we previously developed for the reniform nematode. The results were compared to those of fingerprinting the original population (MSRR03). Out of 96 markers tested, 71 had amplicons in MSRR03. Using WGA of single gravid females with their associated egg masses, 86-93% of the alleles found on MSRR03 were detected, and 87-88% of the alleles found on MSRR03 when using WGA of samples composed of five gravid females with their associated egg masses as template. Our results indicate that reniform nematode samples as small as a single gravid female with her associated egg mass can be used in WGA and direct testing with microsatellites, giving consistent results when compared to the original population.
    Preview · Article · May 2011 · Electronic Journal of Biotechnology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We studied the effects on plant growth from insertion of five cisgenes that encode proteins involved in gibberellin metabolism or signalling. Intact genomic copies of PtGA20ox7, PtGA2ox2,Pt RGL1_1, PtRGL1_2 and PtGAI1 genes from the genome-sequenced Populus trichocarpa clone Nisqually-1 were transformed into Populus tremula × alba (clone INRA 717-1B4), and growth, morphology and xylem cell size characterized in the greenhouse. Each cisgene encompassed 1-2 kb of 5' and 1 kb of 3' flanking DNA, as well as all native exons and introns. Large numbers of independent insertion events per cisgene (19-38), including empty vector controls, were studied. Three of the cisgenic modifications had significant effects on plant growth rate, morphology or wood properties. The PtGA20ox7 cisgene increased rate of shoot regeneration in vitro, accelerated early growth, and variation in growth rate was correlated with PtGA20ox7 gene expression. PtRGL1_1 and PtGA2ox2 caused reduced growth, while PtRGL1_2 gave rise to plants that grew normally but had significantly longer xylem fibres. RT-PCR studies suggested that the lack of growth inhibition observed in PtRGL1_2 cisgenic plants was a result of co-suppression. PtGAI1 slowed regeneration rate and both PtGAI1 and PtGA20ox7 gave rise to increased variance among events for early diameter and volume index, respectively. Our work suggests that cisgenic insertion of additional copies of native genes involved in growth regulation may provide tools to help modify plant architecture, expand the genetic variance in plant architecture available to breeders and accelerate transfer of alleles between difficult-to-cross species.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2011 · Plant Biotechnology Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The genus Chionanthus (Oleaceae Hoffmans. & Link) includes deciduous or evergreen trees and shrubs distributed widely in tropical and sub-tropical areas, including a few temperate species. Although Chionanthus species are planted as ornamental garden plants and commercialized for natural products, genetic information for Chionanthus spp. is lacking. We created micro satellite-enriched libraries of Chionanthus retusus Lindl. & Paxton, assembled 1072 contigs, and detected 1010 repeats. The frequency of the repeats decreased with the increase in repeat length, and the most abundant motifs were: AG, AC, AAG, ACC, AT, and ACTC. We screened 384 markers on 12 accessions of four related taxa that included C. retusus, Chionanthus virginicus L., Chionanthus pygmaeus Small, and Osmanthus americanus (L.) Benth. & Hook. A total of 195 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers amplified and discriminated six accessions of C. retusus and 57 SSR markers amplified and discriminated across the four Oleaceae species screened. To identify the best markers to use in future experiments, the ‘‘Unique Pattern Informative Combination’’ (UPIC) values were calculated for all the markers and the 100 markers that were most effective are reported here. The percentage of heterozygous loci across the 384 markers was lowest for C. retusus (29.3%) and highest for O. americanus (68.9%). The SSR markers developed here could assist in taxonomy and hybridization investigations for breeding programs and authentication of varieties used as medicinal plants.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011 · HortScience: a publication of the American Society for Horticultural Science
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is the first report of sequence-specific microsatellite markers (SSRs) of Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an economically important pest of the American continent. We developed 178 microsatellite markers using pyrosequencing, and screened 15 individuals from 8 colonies collected from three geographical areas, Puerto Rico (PR), Texas (TX) and Mississippi (MS), including Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) resistant and susceptible colonies. Cluster analysis was performed to determine the potential use of these SSRs in discriminating populations. SSR polymorphism grouped individuals of each colony together with a reliability of 100% estimated by bootstrap. In this analysis, colonies from TX grouped away from those from PR, but the two MS colonies grouped with TX and PR separately. Genetic distance between individuals of the same colony ranged between 0.22 and 0.56, whereas minimum genetic distance between colonies was 0.83. Unique pattern informative combination (UPIC) scores were calculated, and the 80 SSR markers that had UPIC scores of 1 or higher are listed according to their discriminating potential. UPIC scores allow choosing combinations of few highly informative markers for future studies. Heterozygosity of S. frugiperda individuals, estimated as the percentage of multiallelic loci based on 120 SSR markers, ranged between 35 and 59 %, with a difference of 2-15% between individuals of the same population. The markers reported here effectively identified the eight colonies of S. frugiperda tested. In addition, they could be used for monitoring migration of populations, in the development of biocontrol agents, in breeding programs, and for management practices in general.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Dec 2010