Timothy J. McCarthy

Carnegie Museum Of Natural History, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

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Publications (5)2.68 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Short term surveys for small mammals in Guatemala and Honduras during 1992–2009 provided important new records for 12 taxa of shrews from 24 localities. These locality records expand the known geographic distributions for five species and for the genus Sorex Linnaeus, 1758: the geographic range of Cryptotis goodwini Jackson, 1933, now includes the Sierra de las Minas, Guatemala, and several isolated highlands in western Honduras; the known distribution of Cryptotis mayensis (Merriam, 1901) is increased with the first definite modern record for this shrew from Guatemala; Cryptotis merriami Choate, 1970, is now known to occur in the Sierra de las Minas and the Sierra del Merendón, Guatemala, as well as the isolated Sierra de Omoa and Montaña de La Muralla in Honduras, and its documented elevational range (600–1720 m) is expanded; records of Sorex veraepacis Alston, 1877, expand the known distribution of this species to include the Sierra de Yalijux, Guatemala; and discovery of Sorex salvini Merriam, 1897, at Celaque, Honduras (1825–3110 m), represents a considerable extension of the geographic range of the species, and it is the first record of the genus Sorex from Honduras. In addition, the first record of potential syntopy among C. goodwini, C. merriami, and Cryptotis orophilus (J.A. Allen, 1895), is reported at an elevation of 1430 m in the Sierra de Celaque, Honduras. Information associated with these records contributes substantially to knowledge of habitat use, elevational distributions, reproductive patterns, diet, and parasites of the species encountered. General patterns include the first evidence that Neotropical species of soricids have smaller litters than their temperate congeners.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012 · Annals of Carnegie Museum
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    Timothy J. McCarthy · Luis Albuja V · Michael S. Alberico
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    ABSTRACT: A distinctive new species of sturnirine bat, Sturnira (Sturnira) koopmanhilli, new species (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae: Stenodermatinae), is described from 49 specimens collected in the Pacific drainage of the western Andes, at 300–2000 m in western Ecuador and Colombia. This yellow-shouldered bat is endemic to this Chocoan region where it is known from nine localities in Ecuador (Esmeraldas and Chimborazo) and Colombia (Chocó, Valle del Cauca, and Nariño). This moderately large Sturnira species (forearm length, 48.1–52.4 mm) is compared with Sturnira mordax (Goodwin, 1938) (forearm length, 43.0–49.2) and Sturnira ludovici Anthony, 1924 (forearm length, 43.9–49.5). Salient characters that distinguish the new species from these two cogeners include a bicolored appearance of dorsal fur, recessed hypoglossal foramina, presence of a sulcus on posterior faces of upper canines, and teeth P2 > M2. Teeth I1 and i1 are protrudent and robust, which set the new species apart from other Sturnira species. Spacing between teeth P1-M3 and p1-m3 is present in the new bat and with the subgenus Corvira. The new species is placed in the subgenus Sturnira.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2009 · Annals of Carnegie Museum
  • John O. Matson · Timothy J. McCarthy

    No preview · Article · Dec 2004 · Mammalian Species
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    Donald W Duszynski · Ralph P Eckerlin · Timothy J McCarthy
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    ABSTRACT: Fresh fecal samples from 12 shrews, 10 Cryptotis goodwini Jackson, 1933, and 2 Cryptotis merriami Thomas, 1898, were collected between December 1994 and May 1998; 11 (92%) were positive for eimeriid coccidia, including 8 of 8 C. goodwini and 2 of 2 C. merriami from Honduras and 1 of 2 C. goodwini from Guatemala. Two Eimeria species were found: 1 is consistent with the description of Eimeria whitakeri Upton and McAllister, 1991, and 1 is described in this study as new. Sporulated oocysts of the new species are subspheroidal, 16.8 x 15.7 (14-20 x 15-19) microm, with a length-width (L/W) ratio of 1.1 (1.0-1.2); they lack a micropyle and oocyst residuum, but 1-2 polar granules are always present. Sporocysts are elongate and ovoidal, 8.4 x 6.0 (6-10 x 4.5-7.5) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.4 (1.2-1.7) and have a Stieda body and sporocyst residuum. This is the 49th Eimeria species described from all Insectivora but only the third from Cryptotis species.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2003 · Journal of Parasitology
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    ABSTRACT: La distribución del olingo, Bassaricyon gabbii J. A. Allen, 1876, varía dependiendo de la referencia taxonómica seleccionada. Seguimos a Wozencraft (1993) quien reconoce a esta especie para la vertiente Pacífica de Ecuador y Colombia, la vertiente caribeña de Colombia y hasta el norte de Nicaragua en Centro América. Documentamos por primera vez la presencia de Bassaricyon gabbi en el este de Honduras y Guatemala, lo que representa una extensión del rango de distribución de unos 410 km al noroeste del sitio de Matagalpa, Nicaragua (Hall,1981). Incluimos datos de otras localidades en Nicaragua. La subespecie, B. g. richardsoni, está reconocida para el norte de Costa Rica (Hall,1981), ya que existe un informe de un espécimen de Lajas Villa Quesada, Provincia de Alajuela (Goodwin,1946). Timm et al., (1989) reportaron dos especímenes de Puerto Viejo de Sarapiquí y observaciones realizadas en la Estación Biológica La Selva. El 12 de julio de 1962 se recolectó una hembra (UMMZ 112321) con mamas abdominales alargadas en Puerto Viejo. William B. Richardson recolectó el holotipo de B. g. richardsoni en Río Grande, Nicaragua. Allen (1908:647) describió la localidad de Río Grande de Richardson como "al sur de Tuma, y a baja altitud" que posteriormente fue determinada como "700 pies" (Allen, 1910:88). Jones y Engstrom (1986) ubicaron el sitio de Río Grande como Río Grande de Matagalpa cerca de la desembocadura del Río Upá, Departamento de Matagalpa. 115 Revista Mexicana de Mastozoología 4: 110-112. 1999-2000.
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