Dany Rouillard

Institut Curie, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (28)143.17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Ewing sarcoma cells are resistant to TNFalpha-induced cell death and this resistance results from the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Here, we investigated whether NF-kappaB activation interferes with 2-Me-induced cell death signaling in Ewing sarcoma cells and we examined the effect of treatment of these cells with 2-Me either alone or in combination with TNFalpha. Our results show that TNFa cooperates with 2-Me to induce apoptosis in Ewing tumor cells through mitochondrial cell death signaling. These results suggest that the use of TNFalpha in combination with 2-Me may be beneficial for Ewing tumor treatment.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2004 · Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: The human KIN17 protein is a chromatin-associated protein involved in DNA replication. Certain tumor cell lines overproduce KIN17 protein. Among 16 cell lines, the highest KIN17 protein level was observed in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells, whereas the lowest was detected in MeWo melanoma cells. Cells displaying higher KIN17 protein levels exhibited elevated RPA70 protein contents. High KIN17 protein levels may be a consequence of the tumorigenic phenotype or a prerequisite for tumor progression. Twenty-four hours after exposure to ionizing radiation, after the completion of DNA repair, a co-induction of chromatin-bound KIN17 and RPA70 proteins was detected. Etoposide, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II generating double-strand breaks, triggered the concentration of KIN17 into punctuate intranuclear foci. KIN17 may be associated with unrepaired DNA sites. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that 48 h after transfection the uppermost KIN17-positive RKO cells shifted in the cell cycle toward higher DNA content, suggesting that KIN17 protein induced defects in chromatin conformation. Cells displaying reduced levels of KIN17 transcript exhibited a sixfold increased radiosensitivity at 2 Gy. The KIN17 protein may be a component of the DNA replication machinery that participates in the cellular response to unrepaired DSBs, and an impaired KIN17 pathway leads to an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2003 · Radiation Research
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    ABSTRACT: Xenopus p53 has biological and biochemical properties similar to those of human p53, except for optimal temperature. The frog protein is fully active at 30 degrees C and inactive at 37 degrees C, leading to a temperature-sensitive behavior similar to that of the human mutant p53Ala(143) and the murine mutant p53Val(135). Using hybrid proteins between human and Xenopus expressed from artificial p53 minigenes, we have been able to demonstrate that change of conformation of the DNA-binding domain is the major determinant of this heat sensitivity. It has been reported that some human tumor-derived p53 mutants can engage in a physical association with p73, thus inhibiting its transactivating properties. The mechanism of this association remains to be elucidated. The nature of the mutant p53 that can engage in this association also remains controversial. Using the unique opportunity of the temperature sensitivity of Xenopus p53, we demonstrate that binding of and interference with p73 require a change of conformation in the p53 protein. This interaction occurs through the DNA-binding domain of p53 only when it is in a denatured state. These results reinforce the notion that mutant p53 with a conformational change can act as a down-regulator of the p73 pathway in human cancer and could confer a selective advantage to the tumor.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2003 · Journal of Biological Chemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Ras oncoproteins are mutated in about 50% of human colorectal cancers, but their precise role in tumor initiation or progression is still unclear. This study presents transgenic mice that express K-ras(V12G), the most frequent oncogenic mutation in human tumors, under control of the murine villin promoter in epithelial cells of the large and small intestine. More than 80% of the transgenic animals displayed single or multiple intestinal lesions, ranging from aberrant crypt foci (ACF) to invasive adenocarcinomas. Expression of K-ras(V12G) caused activation of the MAP kinase cascade, and the tumors were frequently characterized by deregulated cellular proliferation. Unexpectedly, we obtained no evidence of inactivating mutations of the tumor suppressor gene Apc, the "gatekeeper" in colonic epithelial proliferation. However, spontaneous mutation of the tumor-suppressor gene p53, a frequent feature in the human disease, was found in 3 of 7 tumors that were tested. This animal model recapitulates the stages of tumor progression as well as a part of the genetic alterations found in human colorectal cancer. Furthermore, it indicates that activation of K-ras in concert with mutations in p53 may constitute a route to digestive tumor formation and growth, underlining the fact that the pathway to intestinal cancer is not necessarily a single road.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2002 · Gastroenterology
  • Brigitte Surin · Dany Rouillard · Brigitte Bauvois
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    ABSTRACT: Modulation of the adhesive responses of monocytic cells may reflect their motility at sites of diseased tissues (inflammation, tumors). Integrins alpha5beta1 mediate fibronectin (Fn)-dependent adhesion of human monocytes and their precursors. The effect of type I IFNs (alpha, beta) and type II IFN (gamma) was assessed on the adhesive capacities of promonocytic U937 cells and monocytes. IFN-beta and IFN-gamma abrogated monocytic cell adhesion to Fn, but such impaired cell attachment was not due to altered levels of alpha5beta1 integrins. In contrast, IFN-alpha did not affect cell adhesion to Fn. Participation of cytoskeleton assembly in IFN-mediated cell detachment was evaluated. Activation of RhoA activity with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) increased 2-fold the adhesion of monocytic cells to Fn in a alpha5beta1-mediated fashion, and IFN-gamma treatment reversed the enhancing effect of LPA. Moreover, U937 cells and monocytes dominantly expressed the 44-46 kDa paxillin forms and IFN-beta and IFN-gamma led to the accumulation of 66-70 kDa paxillin forms. These results indicate that IFN-mediated loss of monocyte adhesion to Fn is associated with changes in the cytoskeleton associated proteins paxillin and Rho.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2002 · International Journal of Molecular Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The genetic hallmark of Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ET) is the presence of the translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12), which creates the ET fusion gene, leading to cellular transformation. Five human gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) genes are located near the chromosomal translocation in ET. gamma-GT is a major enzyme involved in glutathione homoeostasis. Five human cell lines representative of primary or metastatic tumours were investigated to study whether gamma-GT alterations could occur at the chromosomal breaks and rearrangements in ET. As shown by enzymic assays and FACS analyses, all ET cell lines consistently expressed a functional gamma-GT which however did not discriminate steps of ET progression. As shown previously [Sancéau, Hiscott, Delattre and Wietzerbin (2000) Oncogene 19, 3372-3383], ET cells respond to the antiproliferative effects of interferons (IFNs) type I (alpha and beta) and to a much less degree to IFN type II (gamma). IFN-alpha and -beta arrested cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle. We found an enhancement of gamma-GT mRNA species with IFN-alpha and -beta by reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses. This is reflected by up-regulation of gamma-GT protein, which coincides with the increase in gamma-GT-specific enzymic activity. Similarly, IFNs up-regulate the levels of gamma-GT in another IFN-responsive B cell line. Whether this up-regulation of gamma-GT by IFNs is of physiological relevance to cell behaviour remains to be studied.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2002 · Biochemical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The mitochondrial peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (mPBR) is involved in a functional structure designated as the permeability transition pore, which controls apoptosis. Binding of Fas/APO-1/CD95 triggers a prototypic apoptosis-inducing pathway. Using four different human tumor cell lines (T-cell Jurkat, neuroblastoma SHEP, osteosarcoma 143N2, and glioblastoma SNB79 cell lines), all of which express CD95 and mPBR, we investigated the potential role of mPBR ligands in CD95-induced apoptosis. We show that, in vitro, the three mPBR ligands tested (RO5-4864, PK11195, and diazepam) enhanced apoptosis induced by anti-CD95 antibody in Jurkat cells, as demonstrated by mitochondrial transmembrane potential drop and DNA fragmentation. In contrast, RO5-4864, but not PK11195 or diazepam, enhanced anti-CD95 apoptosis in all other cell lines. These effects were obtained in Bcl-2-overexpressing SHEP cell lines, but not in Bcl-X(L) SHEP cell lines. Enhancement of anti-CD95 antibody-induced apoptosis by RO5-4864 was characterized by an increased mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO proteins and an enhanced activation of caspases 9 and 3, suggesting a mitochondrion-dependent mechanism. Preincubation of cells with the different mPBR ligands or anti-CD95 did not affect the levels of expression of either mPBR or CD95. In vivo, we found that the RO5-4864 mPBR ligand significantly increased the growth inhibition induced by two chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide and ifosfamide, using two human small cell lung cancers xenografted into nude mice. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands may therefore act as chemosensitizing agents for the treatment of human neoplasms.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2002 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of glutathione (GSH). Recently, it has been reported that the extracellular cleavage of GSH by GGT induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that GGT plays a pro-oxidant role. In the present study, we investigated the nature of the oxidative stress generate by glutathione and GGT and the possibility that this stress affects the activity of NF-kappaB a prototypical oxidant-stress-responsive transcription factor. We found that, in the presence of iron, a natural substrate of GGT, glutathione induces lipid peroxidation in U937 cells. This induction depends on GGT activity as it is prevented by the Serine/Borate complex, a GGT inhibitor. We found that y-glutamyl transpeptidase activity induces NF-kappaB DNA binding activity, an effect which is significantly reduced by the addition of GGT inhibitors (Serine/Borate complex and Acivicin). Moreover, we show that lipid peroxidation is involved in GGT-dependent NF-kappaB activation since vitamin E, which completely inhibits GGT-induced generation of lipid peroxides, prevents the GGT-dependent NF-kappaB activation. Finally, inhibition of GGT by either the Serine/Borate complex or by Acivicin resulted in cell apoptosis. This finding suggests that GGT-mediated NF-kappaB activation plays a role in the control of apoptosis in U937 cells.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2002 · Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of glutathione (GSH). Recently, it has been reported that the extracellular cleavage of GSH by GGT induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that GGT plays a pro-oxidant role. In the present study, we investigated the nature of the oxidative stress generate by glutathione and GGT and the possibility that this stress affects the activity of NF-κB a prototypical oxidant-stress-responsive transcription factor. We found that, in the presence of iron, a natural substrate of GGT, glutathione induces lipid peroxidation in U937 cells. This induction depends on GGT activity as it is prevented by the Serine/Borate complex, a GGT inhibitor. We found that γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity induces NF-κB DNA binding activity, an effect which is significantly reduced by the addition of GGT inhibitors (Serine/Borate complex and Acivicin). Moreover, we show that lipid peroxidation is involved in GGT-dependent NF-κB activation since vitamin E, which completely inhibits GGT-induced generation of lipid peroxides, prevents the GGT-dependent NF-κB activation. Finally, inhibition of GGT by either the Serine/Borate complex or by Acivicin resulted in cell apoptosis. This finding suggests that GGT-mediated NF-κB activation plays a role in the control of apoptosis in U937 cells.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2002 · Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Although interferon (IFN)-beta has shown a significant clinical benefit in multiple sclerosis (MS), its mechanism of action remains unclear. We found that IFN-beta treatment of patients with MS resulted in a significant increase in apoptotic cell death (measured by annexin V staining and nuclear fragmentation) of monocyte-derived macrophages, as compared with cells derived from patients before treatment. Stimulation of the cells with IFN-beta in vitro resulted in an even further increase of annexin V binding, as well as increased Fas (CD 95, APO-1) expression. However, no increased Fas expression, apoptotic monocytes, or monocytopenia were observed upon in vivo treatment. This indicates that IFN-beta does not deliver a death signal to monocytes but rather primes for subsequent macrophage apoptosis upon activation or differentiation.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2001 · Journal of Leukocyte Biology
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    ABSTRACT: Ligation of the Fas receptor (FasR) is a key step in apoptosis induction. Using a series of human tumor cells (SNB19, SNB79, 143N2, and SHEP), we observed a distinct efficacy of human anti-FasR antibody with an apparent correlation with Fas cell surface antigen expression. In contrast, all cells studied expressed detectable FasR mRNA transcripts. For all anti-FasR antibody-sensitive tumor cells, we showed a similar efficacy of Mab according to dose fractionation and injection site. We showed that, when injected into nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma 143N2, neuroblastoma SHEP, prostatic cancer PAC120, and the two glioblastomas SNB19 and SNB79, anti-FasR Mab induces significant inhibition of the growth rate of 143N2, SHEP, and PAC120 tumors, but has no efficacy on SNB19 and SNB79 tumors, with a relationship between in vitro and in vivo sensitivity to anti-FasR antibody. Altogether, these results suggest the antitumor potential of anti-FasR antibody in human neoplasms.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2001 · Experimental Cell Research
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    Karim Bensaad · Dany Rouillard · Thierry Soussi
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    ABSTRACT: In mammalian cells, the p53 protein is a key regulator of the cell cycle following DNA damage. In the present study, we investigated the function of p53 in the A6 amphibian cell line. Using various specific Xenopus p53 monoclonal antibodies, we showed that Xenopus p53 accumulates after DNA damage, including gamma and UV irradiation or treatment with adriamycin. Such accumulation is accompanied by an increase in the apparent molecular weight of the protein. This change was shown to be the result of a phosphorylation event that occurs after DNA damage. Accumulation of Xenopus p53 is parallel to a drastic change in the cell cycle distribution. Brief exposure to adriamycin or gamma irradiation induces reversible growth arrest, whereas long-term exposure to adriamycin leads to apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that p53 has a similar behaviour in frog cells and mammalian cells, and that it conserves two activities, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2001 · Oncogene
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    ABSTRACT: Interferons (IFNs alpha, beta and gamma) and all trans retinoic acid (RA) have the ability to activate genes with GAS sites. We have found that the promoter of CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV) contains a consensus GAS site TTCnnnGAA located at bp-35 to -27, and computer analysis confirmed this sequence to be a putative Stat binding site. Consistent with this finding, we show that IFNs and RA rapidly enhanced CD26 gene and protein expression in chronic B lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells. Immunoblot analyses revealed that unstimulated B-CLL cells expressed detectable levels of serine/tyrosine-phosphorylated Stat1alpha, and RA and IFN-gamma treatment led to increased levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat1alpha and its nuclear accumulation. As shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, RA and IFN-gamma increased the binding of a nuclear protein to the GAS-CD26 element. Shift-Western blotting identified Stat1alpha as the GAS-CD26 binding factor. Augmented levels of CD26 protein in malignant B cells cultured with IFNs or RA coincided with the enhancement of DPPIV activity. Taken together, our results are in favor of the IFN-/RA-mediated upregulation of CD26/DPPIV in B-CLL through the signaling pathway involving Stat1alpha and the GAS response element of CD26 promoter.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2000 · Oncogene
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    Brigitte Surin · Dany Rouillard · Brigitte Bauvois
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    ABSTRACT: Modulation of the adhesive responses of monocytic cells may reflect their motility within the bone marrow and at sites of inflammation. Monocyte alpha5beta1 integrins mediate fibronectin-dependent adhesion. We previously showed that type II IFN-gamma reduces adhesiveness to fibronectin (Fn) whereas TGF-beta1 enhances cell attachment. Here, we investigate the role of type I IFNs (alpha, beta) on the adhesive capacity of monocytic cells. The influence of IFNs on the human U937 cell line adhesion to fibronectin-coated surfaces was determined. The expression of integrins and cytoskeleton proteins was analyzed by FACS, Western blotting and/or fluorescence microscopy analyses. IFN-alpha did not affect cell adhesion to fibronectin. In contrast, IFN-beta, like IFN-gamma, abrogated U937 adhesion to fibronectin and antagonized TGF-beta1-mediated cell attachment to Fn. The impaired binding of IFN-beta- and IFN-gamma-treated cells to fibronectin was not due to reduced levels of alpha5beta1 integrins. IFN-beta and IFN-gamma re-organized filamentous actin, and such rearrangement differed from that observed in TGF-beta1-adhesive cells. U937 cells dominantly expressed 44 to 46 kDa paxillin forms and treatment with IFNs enhanced the number of 66 to 70 kDa forms of paxillin. Our data show that IFN-beta and IFN-gamma induced loss of monocytic adhesion to fibronectin associated with changes in actin and paxillin cytoskeleton, thereby pointing to a possible effect of these cytokines in monocyte trafficking.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2000 · The Hematology Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Only half of colorectal-cancer patients elicit serum antibodies in response to intratumoral p53-gene mutations. Our study was designed to compare cellular events (p53-protein accumulation and gene mutations) with the presence of circulating anti-p53 antibodies (p53-Ab). Thirty-five colorectal-cancer patients were studied for their intratumoral p53-protein accumulation and circulating p53-Ab. Tumour DNA was analyzed for genomic mutations in a sub-set of 28 patients. In all, 18 tumours (51.4%) were positive by immunohistochemistry, and 17 tumour extracts were shown to contain “mutant” conformation p53 protein, 16 of them being were concordant by both methods. Of the 28 tumours tested by DGGE, 16 contained alterations in p53 exons 5 to 8 (57.1%). Of 12 tumours without detectable mutations, 10 were “mutant”-conformation-negative by immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Paradiploid tumors presented more frequently wild-type p53 genes and were significantly less frequently immunohistochemistry- or p53-Ab-positive than polyploid tumors. Circulating p53-Ab were detected in the serum of 11 patients (31%). In 9/11 cases, a gene mutation was found in the corresponding tumour. Three of four mutations in exon 8 and 3/3 mutations in exons 5-6 were associated with p53-Ab, in contrast with only 3/9 mutations in exon 7. We found good agreement in the detection of p53-gene alterations by different methods. However, our data suggest that all gene mutations may not be equivalent in term of immunogenicity. Int. J. Cancer 81:712–718, 1999. © 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 1999 · International Journal of Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: The activation antigen CD38, which has NAD+ glycohydrolase activity in its extracellular domain, is expressed by a large variety of cell types. Few investigations into the regulation of CD38 expression by physiologic stimuli have been reported. As the CD38 promoter contains potential binding sites for interferon (IFN) regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), we investigated the influence of IFN type I (alpha and beta) and type II (gamma) on CD38 gene expression of leukemic B cells. Using the IFN-responsive B cell line Eskol, we found by RT-PCR analysis a rapid time-dependent induction in CD38 mRNA (starting at 6 h) with each type of IFN. This induction was independent of protein synthesis, suggesting that CD38 gene activation does not require IRF-1 but is merely under direct transcriptional regulation by latent IFN-inducible factors. mRNA stimulation was followed within 24 h by induction of membrane CD38, which coincided with rises of CD38-specific ectoenzymatic activities, that is, NAD+ glycohydrolase, (A/G)DP-ribosyl cyclase, and cyclic ADP ribose hydrolase activities. IFN failed to induce or upregulate the other CD38-related ectoenzymes analyzed, that is, CD39, CD73, CD157, and PC-1. Similarly, treatment of leukemic cells of patients with B chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) with IFN resulted in an increase in CD38 mRNA mirrored by plasma membrane upregulation of CD38 and NAD+ glycohydrolase activity. Further investigation in relation to CD38 gene activation and B-CLL behavior remains to be defined.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 1999 · Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research
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    ABSTRACT: Only half of colorectal-cancer patients elicit serum antibodies in response to intratumoral p53-gene mutations. Our study was designed to compare cellular events (p53-protein accumulation and gene mutations) with the presence of circulating anti-p53 antibodies (p53-Ab). Thirty-five colorectal-cancer patients were studied for their intratumoral p53-protein accumulation and circulating p53-Ab. Tumour DNA was analyzed for genomic mutations in a sub-set of 28 patients. In all, 18 tumours (51.4%) were positive by immunohistochemistry, and 17 tumour extracts were shown to contain "mutant" conformation p53 protein, 16 of them being were concordant by both methods. Of the 28 tumours tested by DGGE, 16 contained alterations in p53 exons 5 to 8 (57.1%). Of 12 tumours without detectable mutations, 10 were "mutant"-conformation-negative by immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Paradiploid tumors presented more frequently wild-type p53 genes and were significantly less frequently immunohistochemistry- or p53-Ab-positive than polyploid tumors. Circulating p53-Ab were detected in the serum of 11 patients (31%). In 9/11 cases, a gene mutation was found in the corresponding tumour. Three of four mutations in exon 8 and 3/3 mutations in exons 5-6 were associated with p53-Ab, in contrast with only 3/9 mutations in exon 7. We found good agreement in the detection of p53-gene alterations by different methods. However, our data suggest that all gene mutations may not be equivalent in term of immunogenicity.
    No preview · Article · Jun 1999 · International Journal of Cancer
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    B Bauvois · I De Meester · J Dumont · D Rouillard · H X Zhao · E Bosmans
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated the expression of the ectoenzyme dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP IV)/CD26 on lymphocytes obtained from patients with B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) and compared it with healthy subjects. Using two-colour immunofluorescence analysis with CD26 and CD20 or CD23 monoclonal antibodies, CD26 was found undetectable on peripheral resting B-cells (CD20+ CD23-) from normal donors whereas it was expressed on B-cells activated in vitro with interleukin (IL)-4 and Staphylococcus aureus strain cowan I (CD20+ CD23+). The expression of CD26 on leukaemic B-cells (CD20+ CD23+) was clearly induced in 22 out of 25 patients examined. Consequently, induced levels of CD26 cell surface expression on either normal activated and malignant B-cells coincided with the enhancement of DPP IV activity detected on the surface of these cells. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the transcript levels of the CD26 gene was higher in normal activated B-cells and B-CLL cells than in resting B-cells, suggesting that CD26 was expressed at the level of transcriptional activation. These observations provide evidence of the abnormal expression of DPPIV/CD26 in B-CLL which, therefore, may be considered as a novel marker for B-CLL. Further investigation in relation to CD26 expression and other B malignancies needs to be defined.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 1999 · British Journal of Cancer

  • No preview · Article · Apr 1998 · Gastroenterology
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    M T Prospéri · Didier Ferbus · Dany Rouillard · Gérard Goubin
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    ABSTRACT: The human pag gene product is an inhibitor of the c-abl tyrosine kinase and belongs to a new family of proteins. We show here that higher levels of pag gene expression are observed following induction of proliferation and contact with compounds inducing oxidative stress such as diethyl maleate and sodium arsenate. A weaker overexpression is seen in a macrophage cell line using hydrogen peroxide or menadione as inducers. Pag gene expression increases in synchronized cells entering the S phase. This raises the possibility that elevated levels of pag counteract the cytostatic activity of abl. Treatment of growth arrested cells with diethyl maleate and sodium arsenate induces pag gene overexpression, independently of cell proliferation. Thus, enhanced pag gene expression occurs in two cellular events: proliferation and response to oxidative stress.
    Preview · Article · Feb 1998 · FEBS Letters