Article

Antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Ind J Med Res

Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Firat University, Elazig 23119, Turkey.
The Indian Journal of Medical Research (Impact Factor: 1.4). 10/2003; 118:178-81.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating, chronic multisystem disease with an unknown etiology. Recent findings indicate that increased oxidative stress and/or defective antioxidant status contribute to the etiology of RA. The present study was undertaken to examine the oxidant and antioxidant systems in patients with RA and healthy controls.
Twenty two patients with RA and 20 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant vitamins (A, E, C) in serum samples were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Spectrophotometric methods were used to determine activity levels of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), in erythrocytes.
MDA levels in patients with RA were found to be significantly (P<0.005) higher than controls whereas levels of vitamins A, E, C and activities of GSH-Px, SOD were lower in the patients compared to controls (P<0.005 for SOD and antioxidant vitamins; P<0.05 for GSH-Px).
There was an increased oxidative stress and a low antioxidant status in patients with RA. These changes are probably due to efforts for reducing lipid peroxidation and hence to lower tissue damage.

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    • "Cellular proliferation of the synoviocytes and neo-angiogenesis leads to formation of pannus which destroys the articular cartilage and the bone [101]. Some studies provide evidences for the involvement of free radicals in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis [102] [103]. "
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    • "Their actions include the killing of microorganism as well as participation in cell to cell communication among phagocytes via the activation of a superoxide dependent chemo-attractant (Davies et al., 2001). The role of ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in inflammation is well documented (Bazzichi et al., 2002; Karatas et al., 2003; Winter et al., 1962). These highly reactive intermediates interact with several extracellular and intracellular molecules and with each other, thus, generating a complex network of responses culminating in outcome that may be detrimental or beneficial for the host. "

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  • Source
    • "Cellular proliferation of the synoviocytes and neo-angiogenesis leads to formation of pannus which destroys the articular cartilage and the bone [101]. Some studies provide evidences for the involvement of free radicals in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis [102] [103]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There has been a current upsurge in the medical implications of free radicals and related species during the past several decades. These chemical species are integral components produced during normal biochemical and physiological processes but leads to oxidative stress when produce in excess and causes potential damage to cells. A wide range of non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant defenses exists to counteract the damaging effects of free radicals. There exist epidemiological evidences correlating higher intake of antioxidant rich foodstuffs with greater free radical neutralizing potential to lower incidence of several human morbidities or mortalities. Gene therapy to produce more antioxidants in the body, novel biomolecules and the use of functional foods enriched with antioxidants are milestones to newer approaches to reduce free radical damage. This paper reviews the biology of reactive species, their pathways through which they relate to the pathology of various diseases and discusses the putative roles that antioxidants, from different sources, play in controlling oxidative stress and reduce the incidence of concerned diseases.
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