Article

Preventing Substance Abuse in American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: Promising Strategies for Healthier Communities

Addictive Behaviors Research Center, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1525, USA.
Psychological Bulletin (Impact Factor: 14.76). 04/2004; 130(2):304-23. DOI: 10.1037/0033-2909.130.2.304
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Substance abuse has had profoundly devastating effects on the health and well-being of American Indians and Alaska Natives. A wide variety of intervention methods has been used to prevent or stem the development of alcohol and drug problems in Indian youth, but there is little empirical research evaluating these efforts. This article is an overview of the published literature on substance use prevention among Indian adolescents, providing background epidemiological information, a review of programs developed specifically for Indian adolescents, and recommendations for the most promising prevention strategies currently in practice.

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Available from: Elizabeth H Hawkins, May 06, 2015
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    • "More recently, scholars such as Kumpfer et al. (2002) have indicated the need for deep structure cultural modifications by considering critically the values and traditions within cultural subgroups, impact of acculturation, levels of trauma and degree to which individuals in the target population identify with their culture of origin and that of the dominant culture. While it is important to recognize the diversity among Indigenous peoples across North America 4 , Indigenous peoples share similarly negative experiences in relation to the Big Event, including loss of traditional lands, languages, and customs as well as forced assimilation (Hawkins et al., 2004). With a history of such oppression, research suggests that it is necessary to use community-based approaches (Cashman et al., 2008) to culturally adapting interventions, where community members are fully engaged in all aspects of program development, recruitment and design, and the delivery and evaluation of the intervention (Baldwin et al., 1996; Capp, Deane, & Lambert, 2001; Castro, Barrera, & Martinez, 2004). "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2015
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    • "More recently, scholars such as Kumpfer et al. (2002) have indicated the need for deep structure cultural modifications by considering critically the values and traditions within cultural subgroups, impact of acculturation, levels of trauma and degree to which individuals in the target population identify with their culture of origin and that of the dominant culture. While it is important to recognize the diversity among Indigenous peoples across North America 4 , Indigenous peoples share similarly negative experiences in relation to the Big Event, including loss of traditional lands, languages, and customs as well as forced assimilation (Hawkins et al., 2004). With a history of such oppression, research suggests that it is necessary to use community-based approaches (Cashman et al., 2008) to culturally adapting interventions, where community members are fully engaged in all aspects of program development, recruitment and design, and the delivery and evaluation of the intervention (Baldwin et al., 1996; Capp, Deane, & Lambert, 2001; Castro, Barrera, & Martinez, 2004). "
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    ABSTRACT: Indigenous peoples the world over have and continue to experience the devastating effects of colonialism including loss of life, land, language, culture, and identity. Indigenous peoples suffer disproportionately across many health risk factors including an increased risk of substance use. We use the term "Big Event" to describe the historical trauma attributed to colonial policies as a potential pathway to explain the disparity in rates of substance use among many Indigenous populations. We present "Big Solutions" that have the potential to buffer the negative effects of the Big Event, including: (1) decolonizing strategies, (2) identity development, and (3) culturally adapted interventions. Study limitations are noted and future needed research is suggested.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Substance Use & Misuse
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    • ") and greater rates of abuse and dependence (Compton et al., 2007) compared with the broader U.S. population. In addition, AIAN youth may be at higher risk for earlier initial alcohol=drug use and higher rates of use (Beauvais, Jumper-Thurman, & Burnside, 2008; Hawkins, Cummins, & Marlatt, 2004) and may experience disproportionately higher levels of prolonged use and associated negative consequences (Barlow et al., 2012; Novins & Indian Adolescent BA, 2004; Whitbeck, Yu, Johnson, Hoyt, & Walls, 2008). Furthermore, SUAD-related health and social consequences include higher rates of morbidity and mortality due to illness and disease, injuries, suicide and homicide, and other health, social, and economic challenges (Compton et al., 2007; Hasin, Stinson, Ogburn, & Grant, 2007; Indian Health Service, 2011; Whitesell, Beals, Crow, Mitchell, & Novins, 2012). "
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    ABSTRACT: Community-university teams investigated substance use, abuse, and dependence (SUAD) and related concerns, needs, strengths, and resources in four Washington State Tribal communities. A total of 153 key community members shared their perspectives through 43 semi-structured interviews and 19 semi-structured focus groups. Qualitative data analysis revealed robust themes: prescription medications and alcohol were perceived as most prevalent and concerning; family and peer influences and emotional distress were prominent perceived risk factors; and SUAD intervention resources varied across communities. Findings may guide future research and the development of much needed strength-based, culturally appropriate, and effective SUAD interventions for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and their communities.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
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