Article

What does the prefrontal cortex “do” in affect: Perspectives on frontal EEG asymmetry research. Biological Psychology, 67, 219-233

Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience, W.M. Keck Laboratory for Functional Neuroimaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1202 West Johnson Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
Biological Psychology (Impact Factor: 3.4). 11/2004; 67(1-2):219-33. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2004.03.008
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This commentary provides reflections on the current state of affairs in research on EEG frontal asymmetries associated with affect. Although considerable progress has occurred since the first report on this topic 25 years ago, research on frontal EEG asymmetries associated with affect has largely evolved in the absence of any serious connection with neuroscience research on the structure and function of the primate prefrontal cortex (PFC). Such integration is important as this work progresses since the neuroscience literature can help to understand what the prefrontal cortex is "doing" in affective processing. Data from the neuroscience literature on the heterogeneity of different sectors of the PFC are introduced and more specific hypotheses are offered about what different sectors of the PFC might be doing in affect. A number of methodological issues associated with EEG measures of functional prefrontal asymmetries are also considered.

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    • "EEG is non-invasive and provides better time resolution than other CNS signals. However, most existing research on emotional EEG has focused on single-electrode EEG characteristic responses rather than an array of EEG electrodes in HC participant [21] [22] [23]. For example, Baumgartner et al. showed that EEG activity over the left hemisphere increases in happy conditions compared to negative emotional conditions [22]. "
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