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Converging Technologies for Enhancing Human Performance: Science and Business Perspectives

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Abstract

Our goal is to provide a rough sketch of some of the possible implications of converging technologies for enhancing human performance ((Roco and Bainbridge, 2002)) from both a science and a business perspective. Converging technologies refers to a type of coevolutionary progress that is characterized by rapid advances across multiple areas of technology (nano-bio-info-cogno or NBIC), accelerated by interdisciplinary cross-fertilization as the advances in one area spill over and speed progress in other areas. The rapid, multi-front progress characteristic of converging technologies results in better technological capabilities which are faster and cheaper, and can be broadly applied for many different purposes. In this paper, we specifically explore applications of converging technologies for enhancing human performance, that is, enhancing our human ability to achieve goals both individually and collectively. These applications hold the promise to make people healthier, wealthier, and wiser as well as to make businesses more responsive, resilient, and adaptive.

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... Conceitualmente, a Convergência Tecnológica (CT) consiste no processo de integração sinérgica entre múltiplas áreas do conhecimento científico e tecnológico, que tem permitido acelerar a geração de novos conhecimentos, soluções tecnológicas e na produção de bens e serviços, fazendo com que avanços em uma área permitam o progresso em outras (Spohrer;Engelbart, 2004). ...
... Conceitualmente, a Convergência Tecnológica (CT) consiste no processo de integração sinérgica entre múltiplas áreas do conhecimento científico e tecnológico, que tem permitido acelerar a geração de novos conhecimentos, soluções tecnológicas e na produção de bens e serviços, fazendo com que avanços em uma área permitam o progresso em outras (Spohrer;Engelbart, 2004). ...
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O objetivo deste documento é identificar um conjunto de sinais e tendências para a Ciência do Solo no horizonte 2030, consolidados em megatendências. São apresentadas as principais forças de mudanças que impulsionam importantes transformações do mundo e da agropecuária, bem como seus impactos sobre o futuro da Ciência do Solo.
... Enhancing human performance means enhancing human abilities to achieve goals both individually and collectively through the convergence of technologies. Enhancing human performance also hold the promise to make people healthier, wealthier, and wiser as well as to make business more responsive, resilient, and adaptive [22]. LG ...
... Enhancing human performance means enhancing human abilities to achieve goals both individually and collectively through the convergence of technologies. Enhancing human performance also hold the promise to make people healthier, wealthier, and wiser as well as to make business more responsive, resilient, and adaptive [22]. In addition, Engelbart [6] asserted that technology could be used to augment human performance to address complex and urgent problems in our society. ...
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... People and their ideas are an interesting physicalsymbol system, since both biological and nonbiological processes are at work, driving change in the system. Human evolution is driven by adaptation of people to their environment, and that environment includes both physical and symbolic resources [6]. Simon [7] further developed the notion of hierarchical complexity in his work on 'sciences of the artificial'. ...
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... The convergence of NBIC is expected to result with enhanced human performance which promises to make people healthier, wealthier and wiser with an improved business environment (Spohrer and Engelbart, 2004). Enhanced human performance is to be obtained with the help and control of ubiquitous real-time information systems. ...
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