Article

A Growth Curve Analysis of the Course of Dysthymic Disorder: The Effects of Chronic Stress and Moderation by Adverse Parent-Child Relationships and Family History.

Department of Psychology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2500, USA.
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (Impact Factor: 4.85). 01/2005; 72(6):1012-21. DOI: 10.1037/0022-006X.72.6.1012
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Using mixed effects models, the authors examined the effects of chronic stress, adverse parent-child relationships, and family history on the 7.5-year course of dysthymic disorder. Participants included 97 outpatients with early-onset dysthymia who were assessed with semistructured interviews at baseline and 3 additional times at 30-month intervals for 7.5 years. Results indicated that higher levels of chronic stress 6 months prior to each follow-up predicted greater depression severity at follow-up, controlling for depression severity at the start of the chronic stress assessment. In addition, adverse parent-child relationships and family history of dysthymic disorder moderated this association. For patients with poorer parent-child relationships, chronic stress was associated with increased depression severity at follow-up, whereas patients with a higher familial loading for dysthymic disorder were less responsive to chronic stress over time.

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Available from: Lea R. Dougherty, Oct 01, 2014
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    • "Although these studies either included only women (Kendler et al., 2004) or almost entirely Caucasian participants (98%; Harkness et al., 2006), both provide some evidence of differing reactivity to stress among individuals sensitized by abuse histories. Finally, in a clinical population using a similar longitudinal design to the current study, Dougherty, Klein, and Davila (2004) found that those who experienced poor parenting relationships, including emotional abuse, during childhood exhibited more depressive symptoms when confronted with subsequent chronic stress (Dougherty et al., 2004). Monroe and Harkness (2005) highlighted the importance of clarity in the interpretations of evidence that support the original kindling hypothesis conception that life stress plays a differential role for the first onset of depression compared with recurrences. "
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    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Journal of Clinical Psychology
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    • "Although these studies either included only women (Kendler et al., 2004) or almost entirely Caucasian participants (98%; Harkness et al., 2006), both provide some evidence of differing reactivity to stress among individuals sensitized by abuse histories. Finally, in a clinical population using a similar longitudinal design to the current study, Dougherty, Klein, and Davila (2004) found that those who experienced poor parenting relationships, including emotional abuse, during childhood exhibited more depressive symptoms when confronted with subsequent chronic stress (Dougherty et al., 2004). Monroe and Harkness (2005) highlighted the importance of clarity in the interpretations of evidence that support the original kindling hypothesis conception that life stress plays a differential role for the first onset of depression compared with recurrences. "

    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · Journal of Clinical Psychology
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    • "There is a clear link between early adversity and increased psychological vulnerability to stressful life events in adulthood. For example, women who had a history of childhood sexual abuse were more likely to suffer from depression after experiencing a severe stressful life event in adulthood (Dougherty et al., 2004). Furthermore , those who were abused as children or come from low SES backgrounds are more likely to perceive ambiguous situations as more threatening (Miller et al., 2011). "
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