Article

Effects of climate on admission rates of schizophrenia patients to psychiatric hospitals

Tel Aviv University, Tell Afif, Tel Aviv, Israel
European Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 3.44). 01/2005; 20(1):61-4. DOI: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2004.09.020
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Data on admissions of schizophrenia- and schizoaffective disorder patients to Tel-Aviv's seven public psychiatric hospitals during 11 consecutive years were obtained along with relevant meteorological information. Mean monthly admission rates were significantly higher during the summer (for schizophrenia patients) and fall (for schizoaffective patients). Schizophrenia patients' mean monthly admission rates correlated with mean maximal monthly environmental temperature (R = 0.35, N = 132 months, P <0.001). The present study may indicate that persistent high environmental temperature may be a contributing factor for psychotic exacerbation in schizophrenia patients and their consequent admission to mental hospitals.

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    • "Climatic variables that have been associated to those variations in admissions include temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, rainfall and duration/intensity of sunshine (Bauer et al., 2009; Carney et al., 1988; Davies et al., 2000; Gupta and Murray, 1992; Lee et al., 2002; Lee et al., 2007; Mawson and Smith, 1981; Myers and Davies, 1978; Peck, 1990; Sayer et al., 1991; Shapira et al., 2004; Shiloh et al., 2005; Suhail and Cochrane, 1998; Volpe and Del Porto, 2006; Volpe et al., 2010). According to those findings, some hypotheses emerged, involving the climate driven changes in social behavior, but mostly, regarding the effects of meteorological conditions on the brain, more specifically, on neurotransmission. "

    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012
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    • "Climatic variables that have been associated to those variations in admissions include temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, rainfall and duration/intensity of sunshine (Bauer et al., 2009; Carney et al., 1988; Davies et al., 2000; Gupta and Murray, 1992; Lee et al., 2002; Lee et al., 2007; Mawson and Smith, 1981; Myers and Davies, 1978; Peck, 1990; Sayer et al., 1991; Shapira et al., 2004; Shiloh et al., 2005; Suhail and Cochrane, 1998; Volpe and Del Porto, 2006; Volpe et al., 2010). According to those findings, some hypotheses emerged, involving the climate driven changes in social behavior, but mostly, regarding the effects of meteorological conditions on the brain, more specifically, on neurotransmission. "
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    ABSTRACT: Distinct seasonal variation in hospital admission and various associations with the climatic parameters for mood disorders and schizophrenia have been previously reported in several world regions. There are, however, no North-African studies on this association. The charts of 1987 patients with mood disorders (mania 1181, depression 806) and 1359 patients with schizophrenia admitted from 2003 to 2007 from an university hospital at Mansoura, Egypt, were reviewed. Seasonality was assessed with Cosinor Analysis. Correlations of the rate of admissions for affective disorders and schizophrenia to climatic variables were performed, including lagged and differenced data. There was a significant seasonal variation in the monthly admission frequencies both for mania (peak in June) and for depression (peak in December) but no significant seasonal variation was found in admissions with diagnosis of schizophrenia. The number of admissions for mania was positively correlated to indicators of temperature and luminosity, but inversely correlated to relative humidity. Quite the opposite, the number of admissions for depression showed a negative correlation to temperature and luminosity, but a positive correlation to relative humidity. 55-57% of the monthly variance of the number of admissions for mood disorders was explained by climatic variables. Seasonality of admissions for mood disorders, but not for schizophrenia, has been demonstrated, in an African Mediterranean region with a fairly constant climate. The association between admission rates and climatic variables found in this study could pave the way for further studies aiming at exploration of the biological mechanism of this association as well as tailoring of treatment interventions on mood disorders.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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    • "Inpatient care of the mentally ill, though expensive and resource intensive, is still the safest and most effective mode of treatment for patients adjudged unmanageable at home or in the community1. Seasonality in utilisation of psychiatric facilities has been observed as far back as the 70s2 and this observation has not changed till date as recent studies have found monthly variations in psychiatric admissions with a peak around summer or at the peak of local temperature3,4. Such audits of psychiatric services including hospital service indices like hospital utilisation index or bed occupancy rates are not a popular research venture in Nigeria. "
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction:Reports from different parts of the world has shown a seasonal pattern in psychiatric admission. Seasonal changes in climatic and social situations have been attributed. Such audit of psychiatric services is not a popular research venture in Nigeria.Objectives:The study aims to describe the pattern of old psychiatric admissions in a tertiary health facility and the socio-cultural and environmental factors that may influence the pattern.Methods:Data on monthly admissions over a 5-year period were extracted from the admission and discharge records kept by the nursing services unit. The data was processed using Microsoft excel and the pattern over the 5-year period was examined using graphical representations.Results:There were 2140 admissions during the review period, comprising 1138 ( 53.2%) females and 1002 males. The mean new admission per month was 34.55 (M:16.7, F:18.96) with a standard deviation of 7.49 for all admissions. There was a seasonal pattern in admission. Some socio-cultural and environmental factors that may explain the pattern were examined.Conclusion:This study suggests a seasonal pattern of psychiatric admission in a tertiary health facility in Ibadan. Recommendations were made on how to make use of the knowledge of the seasonal pattern of admission to mitigate disruptions in workload that may be occasioned by the observed pattern.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2010
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