Article

The Drinker's Check-up: 12-Month outcomes of a controlled clinical trial of a stand-alone software program for problem drinkers

Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment (Impact Factor: 3.14). 04/2005; 28(2):159-69. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2004.12.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Sixty-one problem drinkers were randomly assigned to either immediate treatment or a 4-week wait-list control group. Treatment consisted of a computer-based brief motivational intervention, the Drinker's Check-up (DCU). Outcomes strongly support the experimental hypotheses and long-term effectiveness of the treatment. Overall, participants reduced the quantity and frequency of drinking by 50%, and had similar reductions in alcohol-related problems that were sustained through 12-month follow-up. The DCU seems to be effective in enhancing problem drinkers' motivation for change.

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Available from: Reid K Hester, Dec 20, 2013
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    • "strongly predicted by perceived norms than by other factors, such as expectations regarding the positive effect of alcohol or social reasons for drinking (Neighbors, Lee, Lewis, Fossos, & Larimer, 2007). Thus, correcting misperceptions of peer drinking norms through PNF has become one of the prominent strategies in multicomponent interventions to reduce excessive alcohol use among students (Carey, Scott-Sheldon, Carey, & DeMartini, 2007; Cronce & Larimer, 2011; Miller et al., 2013; Walters & Neighbors, 2005; White, 2006) and other groups such as adolescents (O-Leary Tevyaw & Monti, 2004), noncollege young adults (Doumas & Hannah, 2008), and young people in the workforce (Hester, Squires, & Delaney, 2005; Riper et al., 2009; Walters & Woodall, 2003). "
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    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Addiction
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    • "strongly predicted by perceived norms than by other factors, such as expectations regarding the positive effect of alcohol or social reasons for drinking (Neighbors, Lee, Lewis, Fossos, & Larimer, 2007). Thus, correcting misperceptions of peer drinking norms through PNF has become one of the prominent strategies in multicomponent interventions to reduce excessive alcohol use among students (Carey, Scott-Sheldon, Carey, & DeMartini, 2007; Cronce & Larimer, 2011; Miller et al., 2013; Walters & Neighbors, 2005; White, 2006) and other groups such as adolescents (O-Leary Tevyaw & Monti, 2004), noncollege young adults (Doumas & Hannah, 2008), and young people in the workforce (Hester, Squires, & Delaney, 2005; Riper et al., 2009; Walters & Woodall, 2003). "
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