Far-Field Optical Microscopy with a Nanometer-Scale Resolution Based on the In-Plane Image Magnification by Surface Plasmon Polaritons

ArticleinPhysical Review Letters 94(5):057401 · March 2005with240 Reads
Impact Factor: 7.51 · DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.057401 · Source: PubMed
Abstract

A new far-field optical microscopy capable of reaching nanometer-scale resolution is developed using the in-plane image magnification by surface plasmon polaritons. This approach is based on the optical properties of a metal-dielectric interface that may provide extremely large values of the effective refractive index neff up to 10(3) as seen by surface polaritons, and thus the diffraction limited resolution can reach nanometer-scale values of lambda/2neff. The experimental realization of the microscope has demonstrated the optical resolution better than 60 nm at 515 nm illumination wavelength.

    • "Various elements such as plasmonic waveguides [2], subwavelength resonators [3] and optical nanoantennas [4] have been studied recently. Plasmons have been explored for their potential in a single molecule detection [5], biomolecular interaction studies [6], early stage cancer detection [7], transmissions through the subwavelength apertures [8], subwavelength imaging [9] etc. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This paper presents an accurate study of plasmon hybridization in assemblies of coupled metal nanowires. Our modeling provides results in terms of eigenfrequencies and quality factors. For this eigenvalue problem that follows from Maxwell's equations has been solved. Possibility of quality factor enhancement in optimized assemble configurations has been demonstrated.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jun 2014
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    • "Various elements such as plasmonic waveguides [3], [4], subwavelength resonators [5], [6] and optical nanoantennas [7]–[9] have been studied recently. SPs have been explored for their potential in a single molecule detection [10], [11], biomolecular interaction studies [12], early stage cancer detection [13], [14] , transmissions through the subwavelength apertures [15], [16], subwavelength imaging [17], etc. Plasmonic structures of different shapes (nanowires, nanorods, nanospheres, and nanoshells) can be produced by various fabrication techniques. The silver nanowire structure is a candidate for key components in future ultracompact photonic devices [18]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The paper presents a straightforward analysis of the plasmonic properties of metal wires arranged in a linear chain of a finite length. For this we solve eigenvalue problem in form of matrix equations that allow thorough investigation of plasmonic modes with different field distributions. Our modeling provides results in terms of eigen oscillating frequencies and quality factors with controllable accuracy. It has revealed the possibility of quality factor dramatic enhancement for certain plasmonic modes by adjusting the separation distances and increasing the number of wires in a chain.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics
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    • "Most often, the benefit of plasmonics is based upon the ability to confine EM fields into smaller volumes than those achievable by traditional focusing methods, such as dielectric lenses [10], [11]. This underpins possible applications such as improved spatial-resolution imaging [12], [13], enhanced EM energy collection (e.g., in photovoltaics) [1], [14]–[16] , and improved nonlinear devices such as lasers [17]–[19]. In 1942, Bethe [20] used classical diffraction theory to predict that the intensity transmission of an EM wave through an isolated circular aperture in an optically thick metal film is proportional to (d/λ) 4 , where d is the diameter of the aperture and λ is the wavelength of the light. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present a review of experimental studies of terahertz plasmonic transmission properties through subwavelength holes patterned in conducting films. The frequency-dependent transmission spectrum reveals resonant behavior with an anomalously high peak transmission which is mediated by the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. We show how terahertz time-domain spectroscopy has been utilized to determine the resonant transmission effects of hole shape, dielectric properties of materials, and thickness of the arrays. Enhanced terahertz transmission was also observed through a single hole, accompanied by annular periodic corrugations. In addition to metals films, we review films comprised of highly doped semiconductors and superconductors. We finally review various modulation schemes to actively control or manipulate the resonant terahertz transmission using external stimuli such as thermal, optical, and electrical fields. This body of work is used to provide perspective on how manipulation of terahertz radiation via surface plasmon polaritons could affect next-generation terahertz photonic devices.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics
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