Article

Young age at first intercourse and sexually transmitted infections in adolescents and young adults

Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA.
American Journal of Epidemiology (Impact Factor: 5.23). 05/2005; 161(8):774-80. DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwi095
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The authors examined the relation between age at first vaginal intercourse and a positive nucleic acid amplification test for sexually transmitted infection (STI). A nationally representative sample of 9,844 respondents aged 18-26 years was tested for chlamydial infection, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis in wave 3 (2001-2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The authors used multiple logistic regression to assess the relation between age at first sexual intercourse and these STIs and to examine variation by current age, sex, race, and ethnicity. Younger ages at first intercourse were associated with higher odds of STI in comparison with older ages, but the effect diminished with increasing current age. For example, the odds of having an STI for an 18-year-old who first had intercourse at age 13 were more than twice those of an 18-year-old who first had intercourse at age 17 (prevalence odds ratio = 2.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.42, 3.59). In contrast, the odds of having an STI among 24-year-olds with first intercourse at age 13 versus those with first intercourse at age 17 were the same (prevalence odds ratio = 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 0.88, 1.39). Thus, earlier initiation of sexual intercourse is strongly associated with STIs for older adolescents but not for young adults over age 23 years.

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Available from: Christine Elizabeth Kaestle
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    • "This age is slightly younger than sexual debut ranges in other literature (Halkitis et al., 2011; Kaplan, Jones, Olson, & Yunzal-Butler, 2013). Early onset of first sex has been associated with negative health outcomes including the acquisition of STIs including HIV, depression, substance abuse, truancy, sexual violence, and coercive sex (ElseQuest, Hyde, & DeLamater, 2005; Kaestle, Halpern, Miller, & Ford, 2005). Our sample reported a range of sexual debut ages from 10 to 17 years and reported inconsistent condom use during first anal–penile sex, regardless of age at first sex, and essentially no condom use during first oral–penile sex. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2016
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    • "This age is slightly younger than sexual debut ranges in other literature (Halkitis et al., 2011; Kaplan, Jones, Olson, & Yunzal-Butler, 2013). Early onset of first sex has been associated with negative health outcomes including the acquisition of STIs including HIV, depression, substance abuse, truancy, sexual violence, and coercive sex (ElseQuest, Hyde, & DeLamater, 2005; Kaestle, Halpern, Miller, & Ford, 2005). Our sample reported a range of sexual debut ages from 10 to 17 years and reported inconsistent condom use during first anal–penile sex, regardless of age at first sex, and essentially no condom use during first oral–penile sex. "
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    ABSTRACT: Despite high HIV rates among young Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM), there is limited data about condom use during first same-sex (FSS). This study sought to understand socio-contextual factors 50 YBMSM age 15-19 describe that influenced condom use during FSS. Condom use was influenced by individual, partner and community factors. Individual factors: recent illness/STI promoted use, while frequent HIV testing prompted non-use. Partner factors included: partner's proactively encouraging condoms, while trust and condom discomfort promoted non-use. Larger community factors such as the presence of females were key for use, while limited sexual health information combined with peers who discouraged condoms prompted non-use. A multi-level approach may be useful in developing sexual health programming for these young men.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Feb 2016
    • "In addition, early sexual initiation is associated with an increased likelihood of depression 1 year later for adolescent girls (Coker et al., 1994; Spriggs & Halpern, 2008). However, not all studies have found such negative effects (Sabia, 2006), and longitudinal research suggests that the impact of early sexual initiation either decreases or disappears by young adulthood (Kaestle et al., 2005; Spriggs & Halpern, 2008). Prior studies are limited in their ability to estimate the causal effect of early initiation on later outcomes. "

    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Journal of Early Adolescence
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